What did you do to be a better mtbiker ? - Page 2- Mtbr.com
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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    An attainable example is the pro youtube guys singletrack sampler and BKXC. All these guys do is ride mountain bikes. They did some ftp tests recently and I was surprised to read in the comments that both of them were low Cat 4 upper Cat 5 for road racing. I checked the numbers and it was right. That is not far above an untrained level.
    That's a bad example. They're pro YouTubers that happen to mountain bike.

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    That's a bad example. They're pro YouTubers that happen to mountain bike.
    haha so true....so true

  3. #103
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    One of the best things I did for improving on the MTB is to ride road. Alot. Helps with cardio and climbing. As for bike handling on the trails, I've been riding MTB since I was 16. I'm 42 now. Gotta put the time in on the trails.

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    Becoming good on a road bike. It is almost impossible to get in great shape on the trails. There's just too much coasting.
    What chu talking about? Maybe on your trails. Not in MA. Coasting? Hmmm, I read about that somewhere. Ride with a faster paced group for 3-5 hrs. Report back.

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by 93EXCivic View Post
    I am not an expert at all but the things I have found have improved my bike handling more then anything is sessioning stuff (which I find to be a ton of fun) and riding my BMX (also a lot of fun).

    Also getting a trainer and doing focused training sessions has been massive as it has given me fitness to ride longer which means I can spend more time on the bike.
    I recently bought a 22" BMX about 3 months ago and have been riding at skateparks about 2-3 hours a week and I also went to Rays Indoor MTB with it and I have noticed significant gains, especially in my jumping and pumping abilities.

  6. #106
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    One problem here is that everyone has a different definition of what it means to be a "better mountain biker" and some people (i.e., Schulze) are defining "better" as meaning "faster." That might be the case if your measuring stick is a cross-country race, however the OP never said he or she specifically wants to become a faster cross-country racer. If you go back to the beginning and read the original post, he or she was specifically talking about skills.

    If your measuring stick is trials riding, then "better" might mean doing whatever Ryan Leech does to get better rather than training on the road.

    If your measuring stick is dirt jumping, then "better" might mean doing whatever Brandon Semenuk does to get better rather than training on the road.

    If your measuring stick is being a good citizen, then "better" might mean doing trail work and being active with trail advocacy just like some other posters mentioned.

    If your measuring stick is being a good bikepacker, then "better" might mean learning backcountry navigation and wilderness skills rather than training on the road.

    You have to define what "better" means to you.

  7. #107
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    Improving power to weight won't just help in getting from A to B. You'll be a better technical climber. You'll have more physical resources in every situation. At the same power output, you'll be farther from your limit so your brain will work better.

  8. #108
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    Genetics affect ftp not what bike you ride. Terrible example

    . I've ridden less than 200 miles on a road bike ever and I'm 4.7 w/kg. Of my 15,000 miles 11,000 were on a SS MTB on trails.

    Either you have skills or you don't. You can have 9 w/kg and still not ride over a bump. Skills make you faster with lower watts. Skills make you more efficient. Which is what you are saying road bikes do. Ridiculous.

  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by RS VR6 View Post
    I ride road.


    I do find that it helps with cardio. It also keeps things fresh for mountain biking. There are stints where I ride nothing but my road bike...and when I get back on the MTB...it kinda renews the MTB stoke.
    Nice. I ride road 2x a week for about 2 hours. I would prefer doing it in a group, but the groups around here are dangerous - apparently holding a steady speed and not wobbly weaving are too much to ask. So I put on an audiobook and get it over with solo. Today I was listening to Maddox vs The Universe. Maddox trying to make the point that he is smart: "My first word was a sentence that made sense in context" lol I busted a lung at that one.

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaneDetroitCity View Post
    Genetics affect ftp not what bike you ride. Terrible example

    . I've ridden less than 200 miles on a road bike ever and I'm 4.7 w/kg. Of my 15,000 miles 11,000 were on a SS MTB on trails.

    Either you have skills or you don't. You can have 9 w/kg and still not ride over a bump. Skills make you faster with lower watts. Skills make you more efficient. Which is what you are saying road bikes do. Ridiculous.
    Everyone is 6 w/kg on the internet.

  11. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    Everyone is 6 w/kg on the internet.
    Not me! I'm well under 3 w/kg
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  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    To be a better mountain biker; obey trail rules, don't ride muddy trails, yield to pedestrians and equestrians, yield to uphill riders, be modest when changing in the parking area, pick up your dog's poop...
    This

  13. #113
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    I learned to practice trail etiquette, greet everyone, be kind, say excuse me before and thank you after passing, and never leave trash behind.

    Being a better biker isn't just about speed and endurance.

  14. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    Everyone is 6 w/kg on the internet.
    That's the only place someone can be 6 w/kg

  15. #115
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    I'd honestly rather ride my indoor trainer then do road riding. The indoor trainer is easier to do a structured workout and I can at least listen to pod cast and stuff.

  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    One problem here is that everyone has a different definition of what it means to be a "better mountain biker" and some people (i.e., Schulze) are defining "better" as meaning "faster." That might be the case if your measuring stick is a cross-country race, however the OP never said he or she specifically wants to become a faster cross-country racer. If you go back to the beginning and read the original post, he or she was specifically talking about skills.

    If your measuring stick is trials riding, then "better" might mean doing whatever Ryan Leech does to get better rather than training on the road.

    If your measuring stick is dirt jumping, then "better" might mean doing whatever Brandon Semenuk does to get better rather than training on the road.

    If your measuring stick is being a good citizen, then "better" might mean doing trail work and being active with trail advocacy just like some other posters mentioned.

    If your measuring stick is being a good bikepacker, then "better" might mean learning backcountry navigation and wilderness skills rather than training on the road.

    You have to define what "better" means to you.
    Great point. Riding flat road isn't going to be much help climbing a staircase of wet, greasy roots.
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  17. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaneDetroitCity View Post
    That's the only place someone can be 6 w/kg
    I don't know, I've seen pro roadies that can pump out 400 watts seemingly till the cows come home, and they aren't big guys. That would put them at or above 6w/kg. Zwift actually has a chart that lists "international pros" as being between 5.7 and 6.4w/kg. Pretty crazy when you think about it. Nowadays I fall way down in the "untrained/non racer" catagory, which makes sense as I've gotten older, fatter, and much lazier than I was 20yrs ago.
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  18. #118
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    What did I do to be a better mountain biker?

    Lost about 30 pounds in the last four months training for the Dirty Kanza (and the 2020 Tour Divide where I hope to lose another 20).

    Really helps on the hills.

    But I have actually become a worse mountain biker. At 55, I no longer want to risk broken bones so I ride a lot more carefully.

  19. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    Improving power to weight won't just help in getting from A to B. You'll be a better technical climber. You'll have more physical resources in every situation. At the same power output, you'll be farther from your limit so your brain will work better.
    This is very true. Sometimes the best way through that techy rock garden is to just power over/through it. My max power output always comes on technical climbs, hammering over the rocks. "when in doubt, throttle out" was the mantra growing up on motorcycles.

    As far as improving skills, I'd say there is more to it than just following faster guys, although that will certainly help. I found riding BMX put me in a great position from a bike handling standpoint, and running and working out regularly meant I had the strength and endurance to handle whatever came my way. Core and upper body strength are quite important for bike handling. Watching some training videos to get an idea of what your body and bike should be doing, and having ability to analyze what's going on as you ride relative to what you know should be happening will help.
    Of course, to quote one of my friends, "it really seems like the trick to going fast is just knowing when to let go of the brakes. . . "
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  20. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by scatterbrained View Post
    I don't know, I've seen pro roadies that can pump out 400 watts seemingly till the cows come home, and they aren't big guys. That would put them at or above 6w/kg. Zwift actually has a chart that lists "international pros" as being between 5.7 and 6.4w/kg. Pretty crazy when you think about it. Nowadays I fall way down in the "untrained/non racer" catagory, which makes sense as I've gotten older, fatter, and much lazier than I was 20yrs ago.
    Those guys are machines. I can put out about 2.4W/kg nowadays (on my trainer).

  21. #121
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    What did I do to become a better rider? I converted my bike to a road bike by slapping on some skinny tires and got a rigid fork. I figured it was a good thing as on my routes I'm on pavement 95% of the time. I've gone on longer and longer rides since.
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  22. #122
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    You could be the strongest roadie in the world and it wouldnít mean youíll get an invitation to the next Red Bull Hard Line.

  23. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vader View Post
    Great point. Riding flat road isn't going to be much help climbing a staircase of wet, greasy roots.
    Hereís a recent interview with Jeff Lenosky, who is pretty darned accomplished at what he does. He discusses how to improve at technical riding and says to practice and hit the gym. He doesnít say peep about road biking.

    https://www.outsideonline.com/239272...ountain-biking

    When I think about what it means to me to be a better mountain biker I imagine myself being able to ride all kinds of challenging trails like Lenosky, and to ride with style and control like Semenuk or Jeff Kendall-Weed. I donít picture myself simply going faster like [whoever is a top xc racer nowadays].

  24. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    Anyone who wants to get strong rides on the road. If you think that's debatable then you are sorely out of touch.

    An attainable example is the pro youtube guys singletrack sampler and BKXC. All these guys do is ride mountain bikes. They did some ftp tests recently and I was surprised to read in the comments that both of them were low Cat 4 upper Cat 5 for road racing. I checked the numbers and it was right. That is not far above an untrained level.

    You want to be able to put down power on your mountain bike? Ride road.
    I think I do pretty well thanks. Not riding on the road hasn't prevented me from winning races or making podiums.

    I don't like riding on the road and don't do it except the odd charity ride. It certainly isn't necessary to be a strong rider.

    If you're on a specific training program, and need to hit target heart rate zones, or you're trying to maintain a specific number on your power meter or cadence sensor, great, enjoy your road ride. Meanwhile I'll be having fun in the woods.
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  25. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    That's a bad example. They're pro YouTubers that happen to mountain bike.
    Very true. Try someone like Phil Kmetz who's actually an accomplished racer as well, albeit downhill.

  26. #126
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    I picked them because we had real test numbers and we also know they ride a lot, probably a lot more than many anon posters here.

  27. #127
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    Deleted: wrong thread

  28. #128
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    I like to road bike because it's fun for me. WA has the infrastructure to support road cycling. I also do it to build up my endurance and lose weight. I've burned more weight in 6 months on my road bike than I ever had riding a mountain bike over a couple of years. I needed to make drastic changes to lose weight and road cycling gave me a blend of motivation and exercise that benefited my well-being and my health. I ended up burning 30 pounds over 6 months and around 6,000 calories per week riding 2-3 days a week. I also became a stronger rider which benefited me on the mountain bike trails too.

    Did my road cycling experience help my mountain biking? I'd say yes. I learned a great deal about cadence and rpms while on a road bike and used that experience to my advantage for long mountain bike pedaling sessions.
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  29. #129
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    My revelation came about 8 years ago, when I asked my wife to take a Trek Dirt Series bike lesson weekend. She needed lessons but NOT me who's been riding 20+ years.

    I observed and filmed and realized that 60% if the skills being taught, I did NOT know. I was doing it wrong.

    Since then, I've taken a few coaching lessons and I always ask people how I do certain things better. Every time I ask experts, folks become very willing teachers. Some can explain well, some can not.

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  30. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    I think I do pretty well thanks. Not riding on the road hasn't prevented me from winning races or making podiums.

    I don't like riding on the road and don't do it except the odd charity ride. It certainly isn't necessary to be a strong rider.

    If you're on a specific training program, and need to hit target heart rate zones, or you're trying to maintain a specific number on your power meter or cadence sensor, great, enjoy your road ride. Meanwhile I'll be having fun in the woods.
    On point. I sold my beloved Litespeed Vortex because it was just to dangerous to ride here in the mountains with drunks, soccer mom's and blind corners. My single speed keeps me in shape and my race results have not dropped off.
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  31. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by Battery View Post
    I like to road bike because it's fun for me. WA has the infrastructure to support road cycling. I also do it to build up my endurance and lose weight. I've burned more weight in 6 months on my road bike than I ever had riding a mountain bike over a couple of years. I needed to make drastic changes to lose weight and road cycling gave me a blend of motivation and exercise that benefited my well-being and my health. I ended up burning 30 pounds over 6 months and around 6,000 calories per week riding 2-3 days a week. I also became a stronger rider which benefited me on the mountain bike trails too.

    Did my road cycling experience help my mountain biking? I'd say yes. I learned a great deal about cadence and rpms while on a road bike and used that experience to my advantage for long mountain bike pedaling sessions.
    I don't get how people can think that road biking would not help with mountain biking...it's not like it is counter productive, or inhibits MTB...I would say the only things that would NOT help MTB are things that would not enhance physical health...hell, you can probably fins elements of baseball that would help MTBing...and those are 2 very different activities
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  32. #132
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    I gave up riding road a number of years ago after getting hit by a car and a handful of other close calls...all while riding in a big bike lane.
    I would have to disagree as several have done regarding road riding being necessary to be fast on a MTB. First, let's partition the two skills you need to be fast....1) fitness and 2) skills. (maybe an oversimplification, but go with me on it). There is so much "free speed" to be gained by being an efficient rider; using the terrain much like a pump track, and perfecting good cornering skills. You won't be able to work on that riding a road bike and depending on your access to trails, you may not as well.
    Regarding fitness, you ability to gain it on a MTB also depends on what trails you have access to. I've been running a power meter for about a year and was amazed at trails with so many turns how my average power was low...it was really a case of pedal-coast-pedal-coast....even if I rode them as fast as possible, I could not stay on the gas consistently. That led me to choosing trails (I'm lucky here in PHX) that have longer, sustained pedaling so that I could effectively create intervals. I still ride the twisty stuff, but that's where I work on my handling skills.
    Which brings me to another point...I've met plenty of guys who do 80% of their riding on trainers or the road and have HUGE fitness...they are also the ones that crash in the dirt the most.
    So, bottom line, gotta work both fitness and skills equally.

  33. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    My revelation came about 8 years ago, when I asked my wife to take a Trek Dirt Series bike lesson weekend. She needed lessons but NOT me who's been riding 20+ years.

    I observed and filmed and realized that 60% if the skills being taught, I did NOT know. I was doing it wrong.

    Since then, I've taken a few coaching lessons and I always ask people how I do certain things better. Every time I ask experts, folks become very willing teachers. Some can explain well, some can not.

    fc
    I've had similar experiences with some friends that coach. I assume I've got all the skills, since I'm hitting all but the top ~5% or so of features on some pretty rowdy downhill trails... But then they drop one little tip that suddenly changes how I think about a particular skill and wouldn't you know it my riding improves as a result.

    Skills coaches are the real deal, at least some are.

  34. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    An attainable example is the pro youtube guys singletrack sampler and BKXC. All these guys do is ride mountain bikes. They did some ftp tests recently and I was surprised to read in the comments that both of them were low Cat 4 upper Cat 5 for road racing. I checked the numbers and it was right. That is not far above an untrained level.


    I don't have a power meter so I've no idea what my ftp is. I've raced a few mtb races and made a few podiums, was always near the front and not all that far off from the pros.

    On the road though I'd be lucky to be mid-pack in cat 5's, and likely off the back in many (most?) races. IME roadies are generally at a higher overall fitness level and the competition is pretty fierce, a cat 2 road rider is a highly competitive pro mountain biker.


    I do think that riding road in fast groups will raise most people's fitness levels a fair amount. Will it make you a better mountain biker? Other than xc racing I'd say not really, to me a good mountain biker means good mtb skills.
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  35. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raybum View Post
    So, bottom line, gotta work both fitness and skills equally.
    Yep! Thatís something I definitely do. I donít rely on road cycling to teach me key mountain biking skills. I use road cycling for fitness and exercise similar to how you use mountain biking for the same thing. Much of the off-road terrain here in WA is varied which makes it perfect to work on my mountain biking skills. On the flip side, WAís emphasis on cycling infrastructure makes it perfect to road bike for my fitness. Most of our road cycling trails are separated from the actual roads and streets which makes it easier to ride. We are also lucky to have an elaborate street network dedicated to road cyclists and commuters. I can see why they chose some of these roads to be bike lanes. Hardly anyone drives on them!

    Iíve heard bad things about road cycling in Arizona. If I lived down there, I would probably do the same thing as you and ride trails for fitness. My friend lives in NM and he said cyclists are always hit by cars and left for dead on a regular basis.


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  36. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    I don't get how people can think that road biking would not help with mountain biking
    I never said that and certainly don't think that. I am saying that you don't have to take up road biking to get better at mountain biking. You can improve your mountain biking without a road bike, which is a big difference from what you said above.

  37. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I do think that riding road in fast groups will raise most people's fitness levels a fair amount. Will it make you a better mountain biker? Other than xc racing I'd say not really, to me a good mountain biker means good mtb skills.
    I agree with this to a point. I used to race a lot of triathlons, so I was fit, but my MTB skills outside of climbing were just OK. Life doesn't allow me to be in anywhere near the shape I used to be, so I've been focusing on skills to make up for it. The skills improvement has allowed me to ride lines I couldn't before and generally save energy across the board that I wouldn't have before, so I can still keep up depending on the ride.

    However, I sure do miss the fitness at points on rides. There are climbs and tech sections where putting out just a bit more effort would really make the difference have become harder due to the lack of fitness. And then there is just the overall tiredness that comes from being less fit as rides get longer that get me. Going to do more road/trainer rides this year to try to see how improved fitness helps.

  38. #138
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    What made me a "better rider" was time in the saddle.

    It made me a better climber.

    Becoming a stronger climber got me in better shape.

    Being in better shape meant I was more capable of handling the bike later into rides.

    Being in better shape meant that I didn't feel like I was going to die at the top of every climb, and only hoping to be able to hold onto the bars on the way down. This allowed me to spend more time getting better with bike handling. From there it just got easier.

    We've all seen it.....the guy that gets to the top of a climb hyperventilating....then crashes when he drops into the techy descent because he is too exhausted to control himself/bike.

    It is all time in the saddle.

    So when people say what makes you a better rider....being in riding shape trumps it all.
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  39. #139
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    As a couple of people have alluded:

    Like it or not, saddle time and fitness allow you to do things that a less fit rider cannot do.

    1) You will have better control of your bike when fatigued.

    2) You will build skill more rapidly by being able to do more repetitions of, well, everything.

    3) You will be able to ride more days out of the week, which will facilitate #1 and #2.

    4) "Technical climbing" becomes less of an issue. It's amazing how much improvement you'll see and how much more often you'll clear technical sections on climbs when you are 20lbs lighter and 10% more powerful. Momentum and stability dramatically increase when you're going 20% faster up a climb.
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  40. #140
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    I guess I'd have to kinda disagree that "fitness trumps all"... I think it's a necessary thing to have in order to win races. And certainly being able to crest climbs and stay on the gas and handle the DH stuff is key...but I don't think it's the only ingredient. All that speed you generate with good fitness needs to be maintained with good skills (cornering, tech, etc). Sure, if you're a fitness mutant, you can make up for a weakness in one, but here's the thing...
    How much of a fitness gain can you make year over year (given the fact that most of us here have jobs, families, etc)? And those gains get harder the older you get.
    So, you want gains to last forever? work on skills...
    Also, I should say...it all depends on the race course. Some are sort of dirt roadie courses...but some have lots of tech and turns...and some have long climbs...

  41. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    I never said that and certainly don't think that. I am saying that you don't have to take up road biking to get better at mountain biking. You can improve your mountain biking without a road bike, which is a big difference from what you said above.
    I wasn't calling you out specifically...I have friends that tell me that road is a waste of time for MTB, or that going to the gym has no direct effect on MTBing...to me there are correlations to all physical activity....yoga helps my bike riding, which helps my golf game, which helps my ice skating, which helps my heart stay strong, which helps my drumming...

    I was referring to a general mindset that I see among some people who find comfort in making "separate boxes" for things that might not be so separate...

    and I also agree that you don't need a road bike to get better at MTB - I have never ridden road, other than commuting - and dont' plan on it, but to say that it does not help MTBing is not true.
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  42. #142
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    Agreed (Raybum), fitness isn't everything. I've spent the last couple years working on building fitness, and I've had good results, but more recently I am interested in building a broader skillset including trials skills, jumping, and general shenanigans.

    I build a dirt jumper a few months back, my first "small wheel'd" bike, and have gone to a couple indoor bike parks this winter. It's good fun and I'm growing a new skill set. Learning to manual and ride flats is a fun new skill to add to my skill set.

    I ride with a few guys that have a solid BMX background and they are annoying smooth and skilled. They make more climbs than anyone else I ride with. Did I mention it's super annoying how easy they make stuff look?!?!?

    It does inspire me to work more on skills and session things more, and it's working. It's always fun to see results from practice or focused effort/training. Granted having a high level of fitness will never hurt you, but it's not everything.
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  43. #143
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    Im 36 now, riding and racing since I was 12. I feel like I have strong technical skills and often clean sections that I see others walking... but I run out of gas after a few hours!

    But I got lazy in the last few years. All the technical skills are useless if you don't have fitness. However, if your fitness is there its surprising how much you can get away with, even if you have to walk. Some of these younger, enthusiastic riders without much experience who ride like crazy 5 times a week are difficult to keep up with!

    Doing squats and dead lifts really really helped my technical climbing. Having the legs to click down a few gears is incredibly helpful. Riding a road bike is helpful.

    If you're riding enough to build fitness, chances are you're leaning how to handle the bike at the same time. Its not like anyone whos constantly piling on dirt miles totally sucks at riding a bike.

  44. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    As a couple of people have alluded:

    Like it or not, saddle time and fitness allow you to do things that a less fit rider cannot do.

    1) You will have better control of your bike when fatigued.

    2) You will build skill more rapidly by being able to do more repetitions of, well, everything.

    3) You will be able to ride more days out of the week, which will facilitate #1 and #2.

    4) "Technical climbing" becomes less of an issue. It's amazing how much improvement you'll see and how much more often you'll clear technical sections on climbs when you are 20lbs lighter and 10% more powerful. Momentum and stability dramatically increase when you're going 20% faster up a climb.
    5) You outlast your friends on the trail! I can't count how many times I've done that already
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  45. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    My revelation came about 8 years ago, when I asked my wife to take a Trek Dirt Series bike lesson weekend. She needed lessons but NOT me who's been riding 20+ years.

    I observed and filmed and realized that 60% if the skills being taught, I did NOT know. I was doing it wrong.

    Since then, I've taken a few coaching lessons and I always ask people how I do certain things better. Every time I ask experts, folks become very willing teachers. Some can explain well, some can not.

    fc
    Spot on.

    That what happened to me last week during bike lessons. I have experience but realized my skill is far from riders I see on youtube.

    Im on my late 30's. I'm hoping it's not too late to learn and ride like Martin Maes or Greg Minnaar.

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  46. #146
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    I'd personally argue a indoor trainer can be more useful for someone who is a mountain biker then a road bike for a number of reasons.

    1) It is very easy to do a structured workout which should provide fitness gains quicker then just riding for distance.

    2) You can do it at times when the trails aren't closed. This may not be a problem for some people but most of my local trails are closed after sunset and they are closed during rain and for a bit after. So this allows me to build fitness while not being able to hit trails.

    3) Not worrying about terrible drivers. For me, I am not willing to risk certain roads due to drivers here so putting together a route of any distance is either going to be extremely boring because it will laps or very short.

    I have been at it for 10 weeks and have seen a ~18% improvement in FTP which I can feel when I hit the trails for sure.
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  47. #147
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    Weed and booze.
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  48. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by gat3keeper View Post
    Spot on.

    That what happened to me last week during bike lessons. I have experience but realized my skill is far from riders I see on youtube.

    Im on my late 30's. I'm hoping it's not too late to learn and ride like Martin Maes or Greg Minnaar.

    Sent from my ASUS_X00QD using Tapatalk
    Oh it's too late. to be like Maes, Minnaar or Bryceland. There's definitely a distinction between common riders and rider who learned to ride seriously at an early age.

    And one thing they do is they learn every week, every corner, every jump they analyze.

    But.... once we admit we don't know everything, and the desire to get better exists, the growth is dramatic. Or at least way better than the previous 10 years.


    The other trick is ride with folks that are better than you (half of the time) and ask them how you can get better.
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  49. #149
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    Working in the industry really helped my riding. I am by no means a pro rider but being exposed to different aspects of the bike industry did wonders. Suspension theory/setup, track walking, nutrition, training, recovery, etc etc.

  50. #150
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    I find being waterboarded similar in unpleasantness to riding an indoor trainer.

  51. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    I find being waterboarded similar in unpleasantness to riding an indoor trainer.
    I think I would prefer the waterboarding...

  52. #152
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    Simple ride as much as possible and ride trails with lots of features. See this video for an example a flow trail with features
    https://youtu.be/7VeovlbnBLw

  53. #153
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    I find it funny how many seem to equate fitness to skills. The OP was asking about bike handling skills... at least how I read it.

    Practice, practice, practice. Time and effort. Not giving up, when you fail. Some things you learn just from riding a lot, but other skills you have to work at the techniques until it clicks.

    I think riding with better riders is the best thing. A skills coach is great, but you have to keep at it on your own.

  54. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post

    You want to be able to put down power on your road bike? Ride road.
    Fixed.


    The best way to get better on your bike is to simply go take a skills class. Stop reading nonsense on the internet, and actually go take a real class. It will be the best $$ you ever spend, and you don't have to spend 45 years trying to get good... you can do it in a weekend, and then you can know HOW to practice from then on.
    We don't ride to add days to our life, we ride to add life to the days we have left here.

  55. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crankout View Post
    Weed and booze.
    finally! pump tracks, ride moto, skateboarding (other board sports)- learning how to pump through transitions, riding different wheel sizes, traveling to different trails, understanding your limits. just have fun, ride, and enjoy!

  56. #156
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    Do board sports skills translate to mountain biking?

  57. #157
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    Do board sports skills translate to mountain biking?
    Yes, balance skills learned from carving turns translates over to mtbing.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  58. #158
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    ride a lot and ride a lot of different terrain and study what others do. theres tones of good tips on YouTube. look up "MTB" on YoutTube, and then in settings, click on "Channels"

  59. #159
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    also, i lift weights daily, different muscles each day. being strong can help, and also help prevent injuries

  60. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Yes, balance skills learned from carving turns translates over to mtbing.
    Interesting. Iíd never really thought about it before.

  61. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    Interesting. Iíd never really thought about it before.
    Any sport that requires fast thinking skill sets once mastered always helps translate into other sports.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  62. #162
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    better mtn. biker? i don't know about better, but puttin' out less effort on climbing, getting a DW bike. i feel at least 5 yrs younger. Ibis version, HD3
    Last edited by nhodge; 04-15-2019 at 08:54 AM.
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  63. #163
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Any sport that requires fast thinking skill sets once mastered always helps translate into other sports.
    Hmmmm. Iíll have to think about that one. It seems like a pretty broad statement. Iím not sure how being a master at ping pong would translate into distance running for example.

  64. #164
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Yes, balance skills learned from carving turns translates over to mtbing.
    I think the biggest crossover is in learning to look ahead, pick a line and trust it. Sounds pretty simple, but in reality it's a difficult skill to master.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    Hmmmm. Iíll have to think about that one. It seems like a pretty broad statement. Iím not sure how being a master at ping pong would translate into distance running for example.
    Long distance running doesn't require 'fast thinking skill sets' at all... In fact quite the opposite.

  65. #165
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    Hmmmm. Iíll have to think about that one. It seems like a pretty broad statement. Iím not sure how being a master at ping pong would translate into distance running for example.
    Quote Originally Posted by TheDwayyo View Post
    Long distance running doesn't require 'fast thinking skill sets' at all... In fact quite the opposite.
    You could probably say that trail running on technical trails requires some fast reactions and thus good concentration/fast thinking. A bit broad but ping pong might help a bit.
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  66. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    You could probably say that trail running on technical trails requires some fast reactions and thus good concentration/fast thinking. A bit broad but ping pong might help a bit.
    You could say that, and I'd agree, but he didn't, so I don't.

  67. #167
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDwayyo View Post

    Long distance running doesn't require 'fast thinking skill sets' at all... In fact quite the opposite.
    Exactly, which is why I was dubious about there being crossover to generalized "other sports" as DJ phrased it.

    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    You could probably say that trail running on technical trails requires some fast reactions and thus good concentration/fast thinking. A bit broad but ping pong might help a bit.
    I also trail run. I've found that mountain biking gives me skills (e.g., reading the terrain) that benefits trail running since I'm doing it at a much faster speed. Reading the terrain at bike speed makes reading it at foot speed seem easy.

    I've tried to figure out what I get from trail running that benefits my mountain biking and I honestly can't say I've found anything. Even if I'm in good cardio shape from running, I still need time on the bike to get into biking shape. The other direction also applies. If I'm in good bike shape I still need to run a bunch to get into running shape.

    Nothing makes me good at ping pong. I do know a guy who was a collegiate ping pong playah (who knew that was thing???) and he says that salsa dancing helps his ping pong game.

  68. #168
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    Quote Originally Posted by nhodge View Post
    better mtn. biker? i don't know about better, but puttin' out less effort on climbing, getting a DW bike. i feel at least 5 yrs younger. Ibis version, HD3
    I'm assuming you're referring to the high anti squat on the DW link bikes? That only helps on smooth climbs.

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