Want to stay on my bike for the winter but road riding will road bike be faster- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1

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    Want to stay on my bike for the winter but road riding will road bike be faster

    Hey guys around us the woods are a damn mess and my buddies have all put on the 26" slicks for their mountain bikes. I went out with my FS (no lock out ) and I had a good time but defenitly lost some while standing up to attack hills. How much faster is a road bike is my main question. I have the means to get one will it help mekeep up with my faster friends on the road??

  2. #2
    AKA Dr.Nob
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    A roadie will make you this much faster:

    \________________________________________________/

    I own three mtbs and I love to jump on my roadie because they are so light and responsive. A roadie has zero suspension and rock hard tires they are lightning on the road compared to a squishy dualie.

    A roadie will make you faster on the roads than your friends and if you ride it enough, it will make you faster on the dirt than your friends.
    Not that all teenagers are evil mind, just most of them.

  3. #3
    PCC
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    A road bike is much faster than even a rigid mountain bike running slicks pumped higher than their sidewall rating. I ran Performance Bicycle house brand Forte Slick City tires on my old Stumpjumper Comp rigid for a few months, pumped to 100 PSI (rated at 85 PSI). After picking up a used road bike I noticed that I could go farther faster than I could on the Stumpie. Part of the reason was that the Stumpie was about 5-6 pounds heavier than the roadie. The Forte tires are not the best rolling tires out there that will fit a 26" rim and they are not all that light in weight, neither. Even the light weight Mavic XC717 rim-brake rims are heavier than the Mavic Open Pros on the roadie. The riding position on a road bike is more conducive to riding over long distances fast.

  4. #4
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    A road bike is going to be way faster, especially since you have dual suspension. A road bike has larger wheels, higher pressure tires with less rolling resistance, bigger gears, lighter weight and geometry suited to get the most speed. I have hung with a road bike on a fully rigid mountain bike with slick tires, but only because I just sat in the guys draft which makes a big difference.

    Will you have more fun on a road bike? It depends what you are after. If it is speed then yes you will. I have a road bike that I used to ride a lot, but as I get older I find the riding position uncomfortable, so I don't want to spend much time on it. Now I just ride my mountian bike offroad and on pavement, thats the main reason I have a hardtail with a lockout fork.

  5. #5
    Singletrack Snob
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    road bike is too fast in winter

    Quote Originally Posted by edesros168
    Hey guys around us the woods are a damn mess and my buddies have all put on the 26" slicks for their mountain bikes. I went out with my FS (no lock out ) and I had a good time but defenitly lost some while standing up to attack hills. How much faster is a road bike is my main question. I have the means to get one will it help mekeep up with my faster friends on the road??
    Road bikes are lots faster and I high recommend that everybody try them. It's a whole different ride.

    That said, I find that road bikes are often too fast in winter, the wind chill riding on the road just kills me. I'd rather ride my MTB in the winter because it's warmer (or should I say less cold). I mean, if it's 25F when you're not moving, how cold does it feel when you're doing 18-20 MPH?
    "I've got a card in my spokes, I'm practicing my jokes. I'm learning!"

  6. #6
    Crunchatize me Capn'
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    Quote Originally Posted by PCC
    A road bike is much faster than even a rigid mountain bike running slicks pumped higher than their sidewall rating. I ran Performance Bicycle house brand Forte Slick City tires on my old Stumpjumper Comp rigid for a few months, pumped to 100 PSI (rated at 85 PSI). After picking up a used road bike I noticed that I could go farther faster than I could on the Stumpie. Part of the reason was that the Stumpie was about 5-6 pounds heavier than the roadie. The Forte tires are not the best rolling tires out there that will fit a 26" rim and they are not all that light in weight, neither. Even the light weight Mavic XC717 rim-brake rims are heavier than the Mavic Open Pros on the roadie. The riding position on a road bike is more conducive to riding over long distances fast.
    Oh, I don't know, (not tooting my own horn but it was fun) passing and then dropping some roadies on my XC Hardtail, with 1.5 slicks at that, was an interesting experience this past summer. No, I'm not saying they were racers, but there was a group of about six of 'em and I could see them trying to paceline up to me in my little mirror. Granted, we (well me anyway) were only going almost 24 mph.

    When I originally got my roadie I was no faster than when I was riding my mtn hardtail. But this is all my own experience. Others differ.

  7. #7
    Double-metric mtb man
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    You've got to be someplace with dry roads. Where I'm at, a roadie is waaaaaay slower in the winter as it will generally be on its side in the gutter after having wiped out in the snow.

    If you're someplace warmer and drier than me, than yes, a roadie will be faster. My first century on my FS mtb (with slicks) was a half hour slower than on my SS roadie.
    Last edited by Psycho Mike; 12-29-2007 at 10:38 AM.
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  8. #8
    MTB Rider
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    In inclamite conditions, roads can often become more like trails with uncertain conditions. Consider a pair of Schwalbe Big Apples.

    I would opine that a primary reason for the speed of road bikes is that they put you in a more aerodynamic position. Air and ground resistance is the #1 thing keeping your back. These are the enemies. Ground resistance can be equalized with higher tire pressures*. The downbars gets your head down and your arms inward. This eliminates a great deal of wind resistance.

    * BTW, larger volume tires do not require the same pressures as narrow road bike tires to get them to the same level of "hardness".

  9. #9
    well mannered lout
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vitamin G
    Road bikes are lots faster and I high recommend that everybody try them. It's a whole different ride.

    That said, I find that road bikes are often too fast in winter, the wind chill riding on the road just kills me. I'd rather ride my MTB in the winter because it's warmer (or should I say less cold). I mean, if it's 25F when you're not moving, how cold does it feel when you're doing 18-20 MPH?
    +1... I find my av. speeds drop in the cold weather because I ride the brakes down the hills.

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