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  1. #1
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    Trail Right of Way Clashes and General Duechebag Riders

    Last weekend I was riding with my brother on my local trail system, Ive been riding for 15 years and am familiar with yielding to uphill riders, my question for you all is this, am I totally off base thinking that on wider parts of the trail that is when its not single track, and two riders can easily pass by each other that pulling over to the far side of the trail and slowing to a crawl is an acceptable "form" of yielding to an uphill rider? Well I was doing exactly this and there were 3 riders coming uphill, and the first one I noticed was riding really close to me and I didn't realize it until after he did it, but he actually purposely clipped my bars and almost knocked me right off of my bike with his shoulder a he passed me. I said to him like "what the hell man" and the guy behind him said basically that I wasn't yielding and I could go F&#% myself. So I then realized that this was in essence a rolling mob/trail enforcer group. I can understand yielding frustrations, I myself have had many, many times with riders who on single track have come within inches of hitting me at full speed while I've been the one climbing and I will be the first to admit it can be frustrating as hell, especially when I'm rolling around on a nearly 5 figure bike that if someone damaged it Id flip out, however what these guys were doing I felt was completely wrong. The thing that really pisses me off is it was at the end of a nearly 3 hour ride, like 50 feet from the end of my ride, on a busy saturday and the trails were so packed that we had stopped already 10 times or so to yield to other riders which I believe is why I was using the rolling/pullover yield rather than the come to a complete stop put your foot down yield. I would love to hear your opinions on not only the proper yilding methods but also about these guys who take it upon themselves to police the trail using violence as a way to enforce something that I imagine they only do when they are outnumbering the "victim/rider" they choose to give a lesson to.Trail Right of Way Clashes and General Duechebag Riders-img_1607.jpgand heres a cool pic of my bike just cuz..

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    If he clipped your bars, how did you pull off with enough space for them to pass? I for one like singletrack to remain narrow, so most often I'll stop for the uphill riders. I see lots of people though that will ride off the trail, attempting to widen it.

    If it's truly double-track, like a jeep road, then you may have a point.

    This also goes into the mindset of many people DHing, when they come upon any other trail user, they should be stopping and only continuing if the other user has yielded, but all too often it's a game of chicken that the DHer plays to try and force the other person off.

    Just be nice out there. This has been talked about exhaustively before (do some thread searches).
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    he did it on purpose man, he had plenty of room, the trail was about 8-10 feet in width at that point, if it had been any narrower I would have come to a complete stop, my point was that there was plenty of room for him to be able to ride by me without hitting, which is why I slowed down, still on the trail and came to a 1mph or less roll until they passed.if it is single track, I not only stop, I will sometimes use my clipped in foot, the one I'm not standing on, and lift my bike off of the trail just to make more room for the climber.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    If he clipped your bars, how did you pull off with enough space for them to pass? I for one like singletrack to remain narrow, so most often I'll stop for the uphill riders. I see lots of people though that will ride off the trail, attempting to widen it.

    If it's truly double-track, like a jeep road, then you may have a point.

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    Your bike is blocking the trail. Not cool. (Kidding.)

    This falls under the 'some people are dicks' category. No need to think any further.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fattyrider38 View Post
    he did it on purpose man, he had plenty of room, the trail was about 8-10 feet in width at that point, if it had been any narrower I would have come to a complete stop, my point was that there was plenty of room for him to be able to ride by me without hitting, which is why I slowed down, still on the trail and came to a 1mph or less roll until they passed.if it is single track, I not only stop, I will sometimes use my clipped in foot, the one I'm not standing on, and lift my bike off of the trail just to make more room for the climber.
    Well, just one bad apple then.
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    I also was thinking to myself right before he did it why in the hell is this guy riding so close to me, funny thing is, my brother was in front of me, and he is significantly larger man than I am, he's about 6"3ish 225 and they easily avoided clipping his bars as he did the same yield that I did.

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    Yielding does not mean stopping or getting off the trail. It means leaving enough room and slowing for a safe pass.

    The guys you came across were jerks. Sounded like the trail was wide enough to allow safe passing.
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    ya I thought that also was what a "yield" was. Just wanted to hear it from another biker since there is no official list of rules for sharing mountain bike trails. We have enough to deal with from hikers, you would think that bikers could at least make an effort to get along with one another. The trail system near my home has grown a lot in the last few years. When I first started riding it a decade and a half ago there were about 20 percent of the trails there are now. You could go a week or two without seeing another rider, now with 3 specified "downhill specific one way trails" the traffic has increased significantly. On a saturday I actually plan my loops specifically on trails that are not known to the masses, so I dont have run into a lot of other riders. The more popular trails you literally have to yield at least a dozen or so times to get down them. And some evenings the high school teams will come and your waiting for 30-50 riders for up to 5 minutes possibly. I get that this frustrates a lot of people, so I guess this is how some people deal with it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Klurejr View Post
    Yielding does not mean stopping or getting off the trail. It means leaving enough room and slowing for a safe pass.

    The guys you came across were jerks. Sounded like the trail was wide enough to allow safe passing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Klurejr View Post
    Yielding does not mean stopping or getting off the trail. It means leaving enough room and slowing for a safe pass.

    The guys you came across were jerks. Sounded like the trail was wide enough to allow safe passing.
    I'm not so sure. Obviously it's impossible to tell without being in the situation or even knowing that particular part of the trail.

    I always view yielding as yielding the trial. By not yielding the trail, you basically forced them to a specific line on the trail. They may typically climb a different path up that's now not available to them. Maybe there was a jump or obstacle that they like to try that you're in the way of. I'm not saying you have to jump into the poison ivy to let someone pass, but to be reasonable in moving out of the way. If you were riding down the trail, you were clearly on a line that they may have wanted to ride up.

    The other thing to point out is that if you were going so slow as to almost be stopped, it may have been a good idea to just take it that one step further and actually give them the trail.

    The only time I don't follow this is if it's basically a fire road.

    I'm not trying to be a jerk here, but I do think there are other perspectives to consider.

  11. #11
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    Your bro was hyped on adrenaline...

    Sounds like double-track to me so you were fine.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ctxcrossx View Post
    I'm not so sure. Obviously it's impossible to tell without being in the situation or even knowing that particular part of the trail.

    I always view yielding as yielding the trial. By not yielding the trail, you basically forced them to a specific line on the trail. They may typically climb a different path up that's now not available to them. Maybe there was a jump or obstacle that they like to try that you're in the way of. I'm not saying you have to jump into the poison ivy to let someone pass, but to be reasonable in moving out of the way. If you were riding down the trail, you were clearly on a line that they may have wanted to ride up.

    The other thing to point out is that if you were going so slow as to almost be stopped, it may have been a good idea to just take it that one step further and actually give them the trail.

    The only time I don't follow this is if it's basically a fire road.

    I'm not trying to be a jerk here, but I do think there are other perspectives to consider.
    He said it was double track AKA fire road... So none of what you said matters, which you admit in your post. None of what you said addresses the fact that the guy basically assaulted him either. The guy was a dick, no need to mince words over it.

    If I yield to you in a way that blocks your typical line then you're welcome to politely tell me that and I'll try to quickly move... But you don't get to be pissy about it. Passing isn't always ideal and we all have to compromise to share the trails, get over yourself (the rider who hypothetically gets pissy, not you). Making unnecessary physical contact is certainly not a reasonable option.

    If someone intentionally tried to swipe my bars I think I'd put a good shoulder into them... I've got lots of bike derby experience that says you're going down (I may too, but that's OK - it'll give us a chance to discuss your mistake. )

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDwayyo View Post
    Your bike is blocking the trail. Not cool. (Kidding.)

    This falls under the 'some people are dicks' category. No need to think any further.
    +1

    If I were going downhill on an 8ft wide trail with good sight lines I wouldn't have dropped the speed below 10 or 15 for uphill riders. I would expect the same if I were the one going uphill. Hikers I'd slow to a crawl for.

    Seriously 8-10ft is a car lane!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDwayyo View Post
    He said it was double track AKA fire road... So none of what you said matters, which you admit in your post. None of what you said addresses the fact that the guy basically assaulted him either. The guy was a dick, no need to mince words over it.

    If I yield to you in a way that blocks your typical line then you're welcome to politely tell me that and I'll try to quickly move... But you don't get to be pissy about it. Passing isn't always ideal and we all have to compromise to share the trails, get over yourself (the rider who hypothetically gets pissy, not you). Making unnecessary physical contact is certainly not a reasonable option.

    If someone intentionally tried to swipe my bars I think I'd put a good shoulder into them... I've got lots of bike derby experience that says you're going down (I may too, but that's OK - it'll give us a chance to discuss your mistake. )
    Well, no double track isn't always fireroad, and based on the description of the OP, it isn't in this case. The description was that there are parts of the trail that are wider where riders can pass, therefore there are parts that this cannot happen. So no, not fire road....double track. So while you may not agree with my comments, they most certainly do apply in this context.

    I do agree that you shouldn't be a s***head when passing. There's no need for that.

    I just feel that both sides could have considered things a little differently. That's all.

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    Honestly I was so taken back by the fact that he obviously did it on purpose, then when his bro basically told me "cmon man you've got to stop to yield" etc..etc.. was when I realized what it was they were doing, i.e. assholes in a group playing enforcer, my brother was quick to remind me that not only are some people out picking a fight, but some of them might also be cops with a gun looking for an excuse to exert some "authority" and or a chance to ruin your life, arrest you or something else...I know that its the buddhist way to not let something like this bother me, its not worth wasting the energy to even think about it, but honestly, there are no real "set of rules" for bikers, examples would be when your climbing, then while climbing the trail suddenly has a small descent section, then do you all of the sudden not have the right of way since your bike is pointed down? just got me thinking about the actual "rules" and if these dueches really were right in a way, or not. of course physically assaulting some poor bastard out there as a way to release pent up stress in a healthy way is pretty ****ed up in my book as well, but to each their own.
    Quote Originally Posted by TheDwayyo View Post
    He said it was double track AKA fire road... So none of what you said matters, which you admit in your post. None of what you said addresses the fact that the guy basically assaulted him either. The guy was a dick, no need to mince words over it.

    If I yield to you in a way that blocks your typical line then you're welcome to politely tell me that and I'll try to quickly move... But you don't get to be pissy about it. Passing isn't always ideal and we all have to compromise to share the trails, get over yourself (the rider who hypothetically gets pissy, not you). Making unnecessary physical contact is certainly not a reasonable option.

    If someone intentionally tried to swipe my bars I think I'd put a good shoulder into them... I've got lots of bike derby experience that says you're going down (I may too, but that's OK - it'll give us a chance to discuss your mistake. )

  16. #16
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    The rule is, be respectful!

    I have a buddy that won't yield riders coming up and it pisses me off! I let him have it when he does it.
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    this is why I am glad that our trails are one direction around here. This kind of crap will happen on the multi-use paved rec trails, but I don't ride those very often.

    it is a sad state for the people that look to be dicks about stuff...and there are plenty of them. I think in the end, you win by taking the Buddhist route. People like that are just looking for attention...if you don't give it to them, they lose.

    in that situation though, a small part of me - the hockey player in me - would have wanted to check the guy right off of his bike if I saw it coming...if I could have sensed what he was going to do. I know that would not have helped the situation, but it would have felt so good...

    I had an old curmudgeon guy jump my shyte this weekend for passing him...AS HE HIKED ON A BIKES ONLY TRAIL that we have around here. He got all cussy, and started yelling about how bikes were "taking over the world" etc...I just passed him and kept going. My friend behind me said that he actually swung at me as I passed. I did not notice it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ctxcrossx View Post
    Well, no double track isn't always fireroad, and based on the description of the OP, it isn't in this case. The description was that there are parts of the trail that are wider where riders can pass, therefore there are parts that this cannot happen. So no, not fire road....double track. So while you may not agree with my comments, they most certainly do apply in this context.

    I do agree that you shouldn't be a s***head when passing. There's no need for that.

    I just feel that both sides could have considered things a little differently. That's all.
    Double track isn't always fire road? I use the two interchangably as do most people I know. That's really a pretty pedantic distinction to make given the context of this thread.

    I appreciate that you're trying to see both perspectives but you're really mincing words in order to defend a guy that we both agree was being a dick... Why?

    The OP did what he felt was reasonable at the time, which may have not been a perfect reaction but it was certainly reasonable, and the guy got pissy enough to try and make it physical... It does not need dissected further, the guy's just an ass.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Klurejr View Post
    Yielding does not mean stopping or getting off the trail. It means leaving enough room and slowing for a safe pass.
    I think this sums it up perfectly.

    Yielding MIGHT mean stopping and pulling off to the side, but that depends on the trail you're on, and sometimes the specific spot on the trail. Sometimes I'll stop for a rider I see coming well up ahead, because I see spot that's good to pull off, even though I don't have to do that. Lots of trails in my area are fairly wide because they're on old road beds, and riders might not even slow down because the "doubletrack" in some spots turns out to be more like two parallel singletracks. The narrower they get, the more the downhill rider (usually) slows down. Plenty of super narrow stuff, too, that forces one of the riders to stop and pull off the trail.

    I've had a couple interactions on the trail where the other rider caused a pretty blatant problem with yielding. I try to call them out on it, but occasionally it surprises me to the extent that the other rider is gone before I have a chance to process wtf happened and say anything. Usually it's getting run off the trail by the downhill rider on a narrow xc trail. Never had one where a rider intentionally collided with me. IMO, that sort of thing is reportable to the land manager.

    One trail near me is REALLY popular with downhill riders, but is technically a two-way multi-use trail (hike, bike, horse). I disagree with the way the trail is managed (starting with the way it was built, considering its location), but it is what it is, and there have been so many yielding conflicts that the land manager has posted HUGE, obvious signs about yielding and right-of-way protocol.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fattyrider38 View Post
    just got me thinking about the actual "rules" and if these dueches really were right in a way, or not.
    There is only one rule in the woods and it's 'don't be a dick.' I don't always yield to uphill riders, I don't always stop when I yield... I don't always do anything; I take each situation for what it is and try to do what I would want the other rider to do if it were me. I've literally never had an issue with another user. More often than not we end up chatting a bit before moving on.

    Anyone who thinks they have some kind of right of way and the onus is on the other party to be polite while they just cruise by is an ass. Both parties have a responsibility to be courteous to the other.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDwayyo View Post
    There is only one rule in the woods and it's 'don't be a dick.' I don't always yield to uphill riders, I don't always stop when I yield... I don't always do anything; I take each situation for what it is and try to do what I would want the other rider to do if it were me. I've literally never had an issue with another user. More often than not we end up chatting a bit before moving on.

    Anyone who thinks they have some kind of right of way and the onus is on the other party to be polite while they just cruise by is an ass. Both parties have a responsibility to be courteous to the other.
    Thread over! That is called common sense.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDwayyo View Post
    Double track isn't always fire road? I use the two interchangably as do most people I know. That's really a pretty pedantic distinction to make given the context of this thread.
    double track, by definition is wide enough for a truck to drive down. two tracks, for the wheels on such a vehicle. Round my parts, they're mostly old logging roads, but they get used as fire roads, too, when necessary. Not worth getting pedantic on what to call them. They're easily distinguishable from the singletrack. Most experienced riders in the area refer to them by their name or usfs number designation, anyway, but even if you just refer to them as something vague and general, everybody knows what you mean if they know your starting point.

    This is different from "wide trail" or "wide singletrack" where you have to make a more concerted effort to yield to uphill riders, but still usually don't have to stop.

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    Some good replies in this thread. I'll just add that as MTB becomes more popular and more newbs enter the sport, this is just going to get worse, especially since the "rules" are more cultural norms rather than posted rules. So there is a lot of wiggle room for interpretation. That means there will be conflicts and misunderstandings.

    When I ride, I often try to give a smile or apologize preemptively in these situations just to error on the side of ensuring civility. Not because I feel I am wrong, but you might run into that guy who is stubborn and thinks it's his way or the highway and I just don't want my day ruined by something that matters so little in the grand scheme of things.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    double track, by definition is wide enough for a truck to drive down. two tracks, for the wheels on such a vehicle. Round my parts, they're mostly old logging roads, but they get used as fire roads, too, when necessary. Not worth getting pedantic on what to call them. They're easily distinguishable from the singletrack. Most experienced riders in the area refer to them by their name or usfs number designation, anyway, but even if you just refer to them as something vague and general, everybody knows what you mean if they know your starting point.

    This is different from "wide trail" or "wide singletrack" where you have to make a more concerted effort to yield to uphill riders, but still usually don't have to stop.
    "Not worth getting pedantic..."

    So a double track isn't a fire road until it's used for fire fighting? How do you know if it has or hasn't been? If I piss on a campfire next to the double track is it now a fire road?

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDwayyo View Post
    "Not worth getting pedantic..."

    So a double track isn't a fire road until it's used for fire fighting? How do you know if it has or hasn't been? If I piss on a campfire next to the double track is it now a fire road?
    maybe you should reread what I wrote. I wasn't disagreeing with you. call the damn dirt/gravel/logging/fire road/doubletrack whatever the f*ck you want. it's the same damn thing because they get used for logging or fire control or whatever, anyway. the only definition that really matters for all those things is that they're wide enough to drive a truck on.

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    Yield means giving room for the uphill rider to pass safely and hopefully not slow their momentum. It does not always mean stopping or even slowing, but it does mean that you are giving the climbing rider space to keep riding if possible. On double track that can mean stopping if the climbing line goes right where you are. We all have seen spots on double track where to get a climb you may need to wander back and forth across the trail to find a line that is climbable. If I encouter a climbing rider I will yield to them whatever line they need to clean that bit of climb. Sometimes all I need to do is slow down or go "off line" to do it. Sometimes there is no choice other than to stop. Sometimes even stopping requires both riders to stop get by if the trail is that narrow.

    I was once on a climb where the trail was double track wide, but 80% of trail had been washed out in one 100 yard section leave it narrow, 2ft ravine to left and 4ft tall bushes to the right. As I was climbing one guy bombed down the same spot at 18mph as I was climbing. We just barely had room to not hit bars as I had moved all the way right rubbing the bushes. I had may be 3 bike lenghs before the trail widened (no more ravine) and the DH rider only needed to slow down for a clean pass. He saw me well before the trail got narrow too. Heck had I seen him in the narrows going down before I was climbing I would have yielded since I could slow pedal for 5 seconds and all would be swell. But this guy just blasted through. Not cool.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    maybe you should reread what I wrote. I wasn't disagreeing with you. call the damn dirt/gravel/logging/fire road/doubletrack whatever the f*ck you want. it's the same damn thing because they get used for logging or fire control or whatever, anyway. the only definition that really matters for all those things is that they're wide enough to drive a truck on.
    Ya I just found it funny that you said it wasn't worth getting pedantic, then went on for a whole paragraph about the distinctions. As you say, who cares, we all know what people mean when they say any of them; not a trail, but not a road either.

    Regardless, I was just making a joke and it was not intended to be at your expense. Carry on.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    I was once on a climb where the trail was double track wide, but 80% of trail had been washed out in one 100 yard section leave it narrow, 2ft ravine to left and 4ft tall bushes to the right. As I was climbing one guy bombed down the same spot at 18mph as I was climbing. We just barely had room to not hit bars as I had moved all the way right rubbing the bushes. I had may be 3 bike lenghs before the trail widened (no more ravine) and the DH rider only needed to slow down for a clean pass. He saw me well before the trail got narrow too. Heck had I seen him in the narrows going down before I was climbing I would have yielded since I could slow pedal for 5 seconds and all would be swell. But this guy just blasted through. Not cool.
    Wow, this really left an impression on you. Earlier in the thread I said I'd never had a negative interaction with a trail user. Thinking more on that I think that's just my perspective, I think some of you guys would say you have even with my same set of experiences.

    I just try to keep in mind we're all there to have fun. If a guy miffs me a little bit to make his run more fun I don't get hung up on it and give him the benefit of the doubt. It's just mountain biking people.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDwayyo View Post
    Wow, this really left an impression on you. Earlier in the thread I said I'd never had a negative interaction with a trail user. Thinking more on that I think that's just my perspective, I think some of you guys would say you have even with my same set of experiences.

    I just try to keep in mind we're all there to have fun. If a guy miffs me a little bit to make his run more fun I don't get hung up on it and give him the benefit of the doubt. It's just mountain biking people.
    I've never had a bad trail interaction either but...
    If somebody deliberately crowds me to the point of knocking bars and calls me a mothereff'r, there's going to be problem.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    maybe you should reread what I wrote. I wasn't disagreeing with you. call the damn dirt/gravel/logging/fire road/doubletrack whatever the f*ck you want. it's the same damn thing because they get used for logging or fire control or whatever, anyway. the only definition that really matters for all those things is that they're wide enough to drive a truck on.
    I'm moving on after this because it's not the point of the post, but clearly this trail (and many) that contain both single and double track, as per the description. If a trail has both, then it is NOT a fire road. A fire road can be considered double track, but just because a trail contains double track, it doesn't mean that the whole thing is.

    It's only a pedantic distinction to those who don't know the difference. You wouldn't call a trail that is 50% singletrack and 50% double track a fire road, yet you would still call the wider parts of the trail (those that can hold more than one rider across) double track.

    It's also pretty relevant in this case since it is an issue of trail width. Making sure there is room on a trail that is double track can be distinctly different than on a fire road sized trail.

    I hope everyone gets out on a ride today!

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Need narrower bars.
    WINNAR!

    lol



    my main riding area has trails of varied width and varied traffic. one rule does not apply to every trail or every situation.


    Just like any other trail interaction with another person (bike, hiker or horse) one must make a decision in the moment as to what is the best way to handle the pass.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ctxcrossx View Post
    I'm moving on after this because it's not the point of the post, but clearly this trail (and many) that contain both single and double track, as per the description. If a trail has both, then it is NOT a fire road. A fire road can be considered double track, but just because a trail contains double track, it doesn't mean that the whole thing is.

    It's only a pedantic distinction to those who don't know the difference. You wouldn't call a trail that is 50% singletrack and 50% double track a fire road, yet you would still call the wider parts of the trail (those that can hold more than one rider across) double track.

    It's also pretty relevant in this case since it is an issue of trail width. Making sure there is room on a trail that is double track can be distinctly different than on a fire road sized trail.

    I hope everyone gets out on a ride today!
    So are we talking about a braided trail instead?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fattyrider38 View Post
    I also was thinking to myself right before he did it why in the hell is this guy riding so close to me, funny thing is, my brother was in front of me, and he is significantly larger man than I am, he's about 6"3ish 225 and they easily avoided clipping his bars as he did the same yield that I did.

    on the upside I'm 6'3" 260~ish .. I assume d*cks like this will leave me be ???

  37. #37
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    OP, you were not in the wrong. It’s not just yielding to the uphill rider it’s situatioal common sense. If it’s wide enough for a safe bypass the downhill rider slowing down to a crawl is acceptable. It’s obvious these guys have a beef with those that don’t yield at all. I wouldn’t let a couple of egotistical jackasses ruin my day.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
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    Quote Originally Posted by ctxcrossx View Post
    I'm moving on after this because it's not the point of the post, but clearly this trail (and many) that contain both single and double track, as per the description. If a trail has both, then it is NOT a fire road. A fire road can be considered double track, but just because a trail contains double track, it doesn't mean that the whole thing is.

    It's only a pedantic distinction to those who don't know the difference. You wouldn't call a trail that is 50% singletrack and 50% double track a fire road, yet you would still call the wider parts of the trail (those that can hold more than one rider across) double track.

    It's also pretty relevant in this case since it is an issue of trail width. Making sure there is room on a trail that is double track can be distinctly different than on a fire road sized trail.

    I hope everyone gets out on a ride today!
    Singletrack is purpose built to be singletrack. Double track is purpose built to be double track. I'm not aware of a single place where a trail builder deliberately used both in a trail design. More likely (IMO it's a certainty, but I'll say more likely to be conservative) they used parts of an old fire road when creating the singletrack.

    But seriously, who cares? Why are you so hung up on this? He was on double track. He wasn't on single track. Maybe the double track he was on later became singletrack, maybe it later became the rainbow road from Mariokart... It doesn't matter in this discussion.

    I will be riding later tonight, but now I'm worried I'll just be trying to decide if I'm on single track, double track or a fire road the whole time.

  39. #39
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    Just last week I was having a conversation with a guy who'd been mountain biking for ....years.... and was not familiar with the basic IMBA rules of the trail. I restrained myself from saying wtf and just politely explained how it works. It's not always the newbs....

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    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    Just last week I was having a conversation with a guy who'd been mountain biking for ....years.... and was not familiar with the basic IMBA rules of the trail. I restrained myself from saying wtf and just politely explained how it works. It's not always the newbs....
    IMBA no longer speaks for us, their say on 'rules' is irrelevant. (And I don't just say that because of my distaste for them, there is no formal body who has authority to make MTB 'rules.' Never has been. Individual land managers are all that matters.)

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    We the people ...

    In hindsight the only thing I can offer is speak/talk to the rider before and during your encounter.

    "Hey, you need me to stop?"
    "Do you have enough room to get by?"
    followed by:
    "Have a good ride"

    As many have stated, each situation is unique. I think talking will assist in clarifying what others' expectations are. I've been on both sides of this--as a uphill rider who is not yielded to and a DH rider who will stop, step off the trail, only to have the climber also stop. Ah well...there's one trail I ride 1-2 times a week. It's a nice 20 mi ride. The last down hill is techy and short. Out of all the times I've ridden this trail in 2018, there was only once when I was able to ride this section. Every other time I'd encounter an uphill rider and have to stop. No biggie. I kept telling myself "this section will still be here next time". And it was. And I didn't get to ride it uninterrupted. By August, I was laughing about it to my ride partner. Then the ONE time I was able to ride it, IT WAS WONDERFUL (and that time was last Saturday).

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Need narrower bars.
    Right? ****ing new geometry snowflakes…
    A plateau is the highest form of flattery.

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    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    Just last week I was having a conversation with a guy who'd been mountain biking for ....years.... and was not familiar with the basic IMBA rules of the trail. I restrained myself from saying wtf and just politely explained how it works. It's not always the newbs....
    Eh, my sister in law is fully aware of the "rules," but still thinks everyone with a Y chromosome should yield to her on the trail, regardless of who's climbing or descending. What a dueche bank.
    A plateau is the highest form of flattery.

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    This is my $0.02 as I have been riding more than twice as long as you. Unless its a gravel road, then I yield the right of way to the uphill rider. Yield as in I pull over and stop. If I'm on a busy trail, I still try and do this. Even if I'm close to finishing up my ride. Does everyone, and would I intentionally clip someones bike if they didn't do it for me? I'd like to believe I would not. Not worth getting my ass kicked as I'm too old to be playing Rocky on the trail. If I didn't yield and someone clipped me, I'd just try and shrug off as it's not worth the hassle. Bottom line is try not to get too exited about it and always be the polite one on the trail. Good karma and all that.
    2015 Santa Cruz 5010 C

  45. #45
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    Politeness goes a long ways. I greet all trail encounters with a minimum of “hi and have a nice day”. If they yielded to me there’s always a thank you out of my mouth as I pass.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDwayyo View Post
    Wow, this really left an impression on you. Earlier in the thread I said I'd never had a negative interaction with a trail user. Thinking more on that I think that's just my perspective, I think some of you guys would say you have even with my same set of experiences.

    I just try to keep in mind we're all there to have fun. If a guy miffs me a little bit to make his run more fun I don't get hung up on it and give him the benefit of the doubt. It's just mountain biking people.
    That guy pissed me off because he was stupid and few inches the wrong way could have been a nasty crash if we touched. Those guys will need to learn. He was with group and I knew at least one of the riders in his group. The rest the group was cool and knew the rules. I let them know he was a tool. That said I ride 3-5 times a week and is pretty rare that this happens like this. Just Sunday I had DH rider not yield and zip by. Now in the case there was just enough room to make a mild annoyance so I forget about those.
    Joe
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  47. #47
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    Didn't Dueche make fancy Italian cycling shoes? Yeah, John Tomac was sponsored by them.Trail Right of Way Clashes and General Duechebag Riders-duegi-cyclocross-shoes-1_4.jpgTrail Right of Way Clashes and General Duechebag Riders-tomac.jpg

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDwayyo View Post
    Singletrack is purpose built to be singletrack. Double track is purpose built to be double track. I'm not aware of a single place where a trail builder deliberately used both in a trail design.
    I have seen plenty of places trail width varies. It can vary from true 18" wide track to a re-purposed dirt road. That includes wide single track that is 3ft wide where there some choice on where you are on the trail. There is also two track jeep roads and worn jeep roads that wide enough for riders to pass, but have a very clear single track line with in that larger width. I have ridden trails where all occur at various points depending on the terrain , erosion/weathering, vegetation and history.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    Thread over! That is called common sense.
    Now, if only someone would invent a common sense dispenser and install one at every trail head like they have for the dog poop bags.
    No dig no whine

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    Pass the dueche on the left hand side.
    Is it just me, or does that sound German?

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    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    I have seen plenty of places trail width varies. It can vary from true 18" wide track to a re-purposed dirt road. That includes wide single track that is 3ft wide where there some choice on where you are on the trail. There is also two track jeep roads and worn jeep roads that wide enough for riders to pass, but have a very clear single track line with in that larger width. I have ridden trails where all occur at various points depending on the terrain , erosion/weathering, vegetation and history.
    sure, some trails are in a state of transition. Some trails in my area change back and forth. Some singletracks are on old road beds that have been closed to vehicle traffic for so long that you'd never get a wide vehicle down them again without re-grading everything.

    the definition of doubletrack is simple enough that it means that the trail is is wide enough for a 4 wheeled vehicle, and that the two "tracks" are spaced at a width of that vehicles wheels. Not necessarily that a vehicle could actually reach that point along a continuous length of doubletrack.

  52. #52
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    The problem is that you slowed down enough to hear them. I rarely ever come to a complete stop for yielding.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    Is it just me, or does that sound German?
    I think what you meant to ask is, is that a song?

    What's wrong with him??

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDwayyo View Post
    There is only one rule in the woods and it's 'don't be a dick.' I don't always yield to uphill riders, I don't always stop when I yield... I don't always do anything; I take each situation for what it is and try to do what I would want the other rider to do if it were me. I've literally never had an issue with another user. More often than not we end up chatting a bit before moving on.

    Anyone who thinks they have some kind of right of way and the onus is on the other party to be polite while they just cruise by is an ass. Both parties have a responsibility to be courteous to the other.
    This!!
    Unless you are participating in an actual event like a race on a closed course, it doesn't hurt anyone to take 5 seconds, stop, put a foot down, say hi and smile, then continue on your ride.
    Life is too short to worry about this crap.

    I don't agree with the other Rider purposely hitting you, sounds like a good time to call the police and wait in the parking lot to press charges. But if you would have yielded everything could have been avoided. Some people are dix. Best to avoid them.

  55. #55
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    we all are mt. bikers.. be nice .. up / down hill don't be jerks.. life is short.. I'm pretty big, so honestly i haven't really had a bad encounter in a long time.. I wouldn't necessarily stop to let uphill traffic up I would slow certainly / stop as the circumstances dictated..

    but mostly just be nice everyone. no reason to be jerks.. just ride your bikes and have fun and say hi to others that are also riding their bikes.. and to hikers and birds.. (well I say hi to birds at least)

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    Didn't Dueche make fancy Italian cycling shoes? Yeah, John Tomac was sponsored by them.Click image for larger version. 

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    Off the subject, but I was in a shop in Santa Rosa the other day, and they had one of those Tioga wheels on display. Pretty cool to see (and look at Tomac's chain!).Trail Right of Way Clashes and General Duechebag Riders-20181103_142708.jpg
    What's wrong with him??

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bickle View Post
    It is Douche Bag or Douche Baguette.
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    So are we talking about a braided trail instead?
    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    Is it just me, or does that sound German?
    Sounds French to me. They like those braided trails (and bread).

  58. #58
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    Never attribute to malice what can be attributed to ignorance. I try to remember that I have a very high sense of situational awareness where ever I am and that many trail users are literally unaware of your presence and intentions.

    I tend to stop for everyone on the multi-user trails I ride, I let courtesy and my safety guide my decisions. I've wasted a lot of energy trying to educate sociopathic narcissists that simply do not care how their behavior affects your thoughts and feelings.

    If I do encounter a rude dude or a trail enforcer I just smile and ride on.... or I open a can of whoopass and go postal.
    Bicycles don't have motors.

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    Quote Originally Posted by noapathy View Post
    Sounds French to me. They like those braided trails (and bread).
    Douche bag or Deutsche Bank?

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post

    I don't agree with the other Rider purposely hitting you, sounds like a good time to call the police and wait in the parking lot to press charges. .
    Officer, this bad man bumped into me on the trails, you have to arrest him. lol

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    This!!
    But if you would have yielded everything could have been avoided. .
    I thought the consensus was that I did yield????

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post

    I don't agree with the other Rider purposely hitting you, sBut if you would have yielded everything could have been avoided.



    But he did yeild.
    I brake for stinkbugs

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    Trail Right of Way Clashes and General Duechebag Riders-img_1594-2.jpgThese bars are only 800mm and swept 15 degrees!!! Im starting to see 830mm bars so technically my bars are.....Narrow??? According to the new standards that is..lol
    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Need narrower bars.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fattyrider38 View Post
    he did it on purpose man, he had plenty of room, the trail was about 8-10 feet in width at that point, if it had been any narrower I would have come to a complete stop, my point was that there was plenty of room for him to be able to ride by me without hitting, which is why I slowed down, still on the trail and came to a 1mph or less roll until they passed.if it is single track, I not only stop, I will sometimes use my clipped in foot, the one I'm not standing on, and lift my bike off of the trail just to make more room for the climber.
    Your case does sound pretty extreme but, sometimes it doesn't nessecarily mean that just because the trail is wide that you can assume that it safe to pass without yielding.
    I've ridden tons of climbs on wider trails which the line for climbing is not always over to one side or another and have taken and held that line although it may have been in the center of a trail. My thought, if I'm climbing, especially a steep climb, I'm not giving up my line. I've had similar encounters as you( me being the climber) but never a physical contact has happened, although words have been exchanged.
    To sum it up, all trails are different and the climber should always have a uninterrupted right of way.
    EXODUX Jeff

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hurricane Jeff View Post
    Your case does sound pretty extreme but, sometimes it doesn't nessecarily mean that just because the trail is wide that you can assume that it safe to pass WITHOUT YIELDING
    I've ridden tons of climbs on wider trails which the line for climbing is not always over to one side or another and have taken and held that line although it may have been in the center of a trail. My thought, if I'm climbing, especially a steep climb, I'm not giving up my line. I've had similar encounters as you( me being the climber) but never a physical contact has happened, although words have been exchanged.
    To sum it up, all trails are different and the climber should always have a uninterrupted right of way.
    So your saying that me coming to a 1mph roll,on the very edge of the trail, giving this man over 7 feet to maneuver on a nearly flat section of trail, on a wide double track trail is not what you would consider yielding???

  66. #66
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    Some people are blindly slavish to rule following and also have a personality that lends itself to being rule enforcers - all without common sense.

    Anyway, if there is plenty of room for opposing traffic on a climb, AND the descending rider does not intrude on the best climbing line, there is no reason for the descending rider to come to a complete stop.

    But you've got to be aware - maybe the climber is a novice and is all over the trail. Maybe the climber is super tired, and, likewise, is wandering a little more than they normally would.

    Just common sense stuff. See what you see and react accordingly.

    It's mountain biking for gods sake. This ain't no tea party!

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finch Platte View Post
    Off the subject, but I was in a shop in Santa Rosa the other day, and they had one of those Tioga wheels on display. Pretty cool to see (and look at Tomac's chain!).Click image for larger version. 

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    Cool! I loved the sound those wheels made rolling.

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Need narrower bars.
    Or wider trails....just clear-cut that sh*t.
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fattyrider38 View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	1224903These bars are only 800mm and swept 15 degrees!!! Im starting to see 830mm bars so technically my bars are.....Narrow??? According to the new standards that is..lol
    Yes, but if the other guy is sporting the same or wider it plays havoc in these situations. There should be someone at each trailhead checking bar widths and only allowing one narrow bar rider and then one wide bar rider. Staggering the widths as they enter the trail system so it lessons the probability of two wide bar riders happening upon each other in a narrow situation like what you experienced.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fattyrider38 View Post
    So your saying that me coming to a 1mph roll,on the very edge of the trail, giving this man over 7 feet to maneuver on a nearly flat section of trail, on a wide double track trail is not what you would consider yielding???
    No, I'm not nor did I say that. What I said is that every trail, regardless of width, if there is one good climbing line, I'm not getting out of it to let someone pass downhill.
    Your case sounded pretty extreme and I think you were in the right.
    EXODUX Jeff

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    I wonder if that group had encountered downhill riders not yielding moments before you met them, and they were looking for the next person to take it out on. Wrong place at the wrong time, perhaps.

  72. #72
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    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    I have seen plenty of places trail width varies. It can vary from true 18" wide track to a re-purposed dirt road. That includes wide single track that is 3ft wide where there some choice on where you are on the trail. There is also two track jeep roads and worn jeep roads that wide enough for riders to pass, but have a very clear single track line with in that larger width. I have ridden trails where all occur at various points depending on the terrain , erosion/weathering, vegetation and history.
    You cut off the part where I already said if a trail has double track it is almost certainly an old fire road re-purposed for a section of the trail. That doesn't suddenly make it only a part of the trail, it continues to be an old fire road - now it just has a trail on it. Not sure why this matters, or how you think you're disagreeing with me though. Seems to me we are saying the same thing.

  74. #74
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    Blah, blah, blah. . . and blah.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bacon Fat View Post
    Officer, this bad man bumped into me on the trails, you have to arrest him. lol
    Yeah, that's likely to get a lot of action from our local police and DA. Just read an article where a local cyclist was mowed down and killed in a crosswalk with flashing yellow lights by a speeding driver. Driver plead no contest and got sentenced to community service.
    No dig no whine

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klurejr View Post
    Yielding does not mean stopping or getting off the trail. It means leaving enough room and slowing for a safe pass.

    The guys you came across were jerks. Sounded like the trail was wide enough to allow safe passing.

    Another perspective on this is that when people do the rolling yield, just about every time they do this the trail gets wider. Imperceptibly in the moment, but wider just the same. More noticeable in desert environments, but still -- wider just the same.

    Add this effect up over months and years and you can easily see how our singletrack morphs into something else.

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    Another perspective on this is that when people do the rolling yield, just about every time they do this the trail gets wider. Imperceptibly in the moment, but wider just the same. More noticeable in desert environments, but still -- wider just the same.

    Add this effect up over months and years and you can easily see how our singletrack morphs into something else.
    I've seen people do this on really narrow singletrack, and I agree, it does widen the trail slowly over time. In the east and other moist environments, mostly through soil compaction, I think. I have seen it especially bad in the desert, breaking through the crypto crust. Worse, I've seen people just blast through the trailside brush without even attempting to slow down. When trails are this narrow, then yes, stopping is the best option.

    But if the trail is already really wide, like with doubletrack on old road beds, IMO, rolling yield is fine. The way I say it is that yielding doesn't HAVE to mean stopping. It CAN mean that if the situation warrants, though.

  78. #78
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    It might be best to just turn around and go back the way you came if you encounter another rider.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    It might be best to just turn around and go back the way you came if you encounter another rider.
    I’ve been working on that technique.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  80. #80
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    Used to have a pair of those shoes, man those were some of the best mtb shoes I've ever used!
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  81. #81
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    Here is a suggestion: Stop being an entitled douchebag and just yield to everyone no matter the situation. And say "Have a great rest of your ride!" as they go around you. Be the example, not the problem.



    Or just yell "STRAVA" with your elbows out, idgaf...
    We don't ride to add days to our life, we ride to add life to the days we have left here.

  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thustlewhumber View Post
    Here is a suggestion: Stop being an entitled douchebag and just yield to everyone no matter the situation. And say "Have a great rest of your ride!" as they go around you. Be the example, not the problem.



    Or just yell "STRAVA" with your elbows out, idgaf...
    I think we found the guy that tried to hit your handlebars while he was climbing.

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  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    It might be best to just turn around and go back the way you came if you encounter another rider.
    This is what I do for moose.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thustlewhumber View Post
    Here is a suggestion: Stop being an entitled douchebag and just yield to everyone no matter the situation. And say "Have a great rest of your ride!" as they go around you. Be the example, not the problem.



    Or just yell "STRAVA" with your elbows out, idgaf...
    ok but if you are yielding to everyone and just generally acting like you are driving a car with a cop sitting on your shoulder, what is the point of being in the great outdoors having fun? Just clear the obstacle and keep on. Even a minor assault like the OP describes just adds to the fun as long as you aren't injured. Lighten up people, let it loose.

  85. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    ok but if you are yielding to everyone and just generally acting like you are driving a car with a cop sitting on your shoulder, what is the point of being in the great outdoors having fun? Just clear the obstacle and keep on. Even a minor assault like the OP describes just adds to the fun as long as you aren't injured. Lighten up people, let it loose.
    Agree! Did you just ask people to lighten up and let loose? Lmao Good luck with that. Although that is great advice for many here... it’s not likely to happen

  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDwayyo View Post
    There is only one rule in the woods and it's 'don't be a dick.' I don't always yield to uphill riders, I don't always stop when I yield... I don't always do anything; I take each situation for what it is and try to do what I would want the other rider to do if it were me. I've literally never had an issue with another user. More often than not we end up chatting a bit before moving on.

    Anyone who thinks they have some kind of right of way and the onus is on the other party to be polite while they just cruise by is an ass. Both parties have a responsibility to be courteous to the other.

    Exactly. Last Saturday I went down first, then up a different trail in a relatively small loop. Downhill, two older guys were very politely off the track waiting for me to go down --- they saw me long before I saw them. I said oh, hey, thanks and passed them. On the way up the other trail, different story, younger guy on one of those puke-green 'look at me' bikes is going downhill, I move over to the side of the trail but keep riding up, trail is about 5 feet wide so he's a good 2-3 feet from me, he says sarcastically "Excuse me!" and passes. I didn't say anything back; downhill is what it's all about and I don't want to do anything to hurt his downhill ride, even if he was a dick. So bottom line, if the trail is wide, you move over for the downhill rider, if it's narrow, then the downhill rider has to slow way down anyway to avoid a crash, no matter what the rules say.
    Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres: quod Belgiae, quod Celtae, et quod Aquitainae.

  87. #87
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    Amazing there are so many uptight riders out there. Well, according to this thread anyway. I can’t remember passing another rider with any type of attitude that many have described in here. Probably because I’m very vocal as I pass any trail user. Always a hi / thank you and have a nice day. If they wanted to come back at me with an attitude it seems I’ve quashed it before it left their mouth.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  88. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    ... So bottom line, if the trail is wide, you move over for the downhill rider, if it's narrow, then the downhill rider has to slow way down anyway to avoid a crash, no matter what the rules say.
    On a smooth trail, sure. On a rocky technical climb, maybe not. Even though the trail may be 5 ft wide, you may be taking the line the uphill rider needs. Keeping a straight line on a rocky climb is tough to impossible, for me anyway.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  89. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fattyrider38 View Post
    I thought the consensus was that I did yield????
    No idea, nobody else was out there other than you and the other riders.
    All I'm saying is when I meet other riders, I stop, put a foot down, say hi, and be on my way in about 10 seconds. Never an issue, even with grumpy hikers or equestrians.

  90. #90
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    Playing Devil's advocate here but an 8-10' wide trail does not necessarily mean there is 8-10' of good climbing line on it.
    You could have been on the line he wanted.

    That said, if we're talking smooth gravel road type of trail that was a total dick move on his part.

  91. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by Surestick Malone View Post
    Playing Devil's advocate here but an 8-10' wide trail does not necessarily mean there is 8-10' of good climbing line on it.
    You could have been on the line he wanted.

    That said, if we're talking smooth gravel road type of trail that was a total dick move on his part.
    If that was the case it still doesn’t give the uphill rider the right to clip his bars and act like an entitled duechebag.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  92. #92
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    all the trails around here have a lot of walkers / hikers.. so much like today ..I have to come to a complete stop for someone's small child that is running willy nilly across the trail this way and that..

    It don't bug me ..kids are nice.. and I just stop and say hello more often than not the parents are super embarrassed.. // apologetic.. I assure them it is fine I say hello to the little ones and I go on my way..

    it maybe a getting a bit older thing.. i doesn't bother me at all really now.. even if adults kinda hose up the trail etiquette .. I'll just deal with it ... say hello and then ride on... some drunk Frisbee golf guy did block me (on accident ...I think**) on a super steep climb and it forced me off my bike / had to walk the rest of the way up the hill... I was a bit annoyed.. but meh...

  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    The rule is, be respectful!

    I have a buddy that won't yield riders coming up and it pisses me off! I let him have it when he does it.
    Thats a dangerous game to play. You take away my ability to feed my family; you're gonna pay.
    Ripping trails and tipping ales

  94. #94
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    Even though apparently I am an entitled Douchebag According to Thustlewhumber I also say hi to nearly every rider I pass, Ive noticed a lot lately that at least a couple people each ride just completely ignore that, they dont make eye contact, they dont look at me, they dont even say a word back in response, and no, they dont have wireless earbuds in their ears, and 3/4ths of them are mountain bikers, not hikers etc, I think people now a days are just assholes, or just dont care to be friendly, I dont know exactly why, but it sucks...
    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    No idea, nobody else was out there other than you and the other riders.
    All I'm saying is when I meet other riders, I stop, put a foot down, say hi, and be on my way in about 10 seconds. Never an issue, even with grumpy hikers or equestrians.

  95. #95
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    Right, what a tool! Entitled is such a douchebag term! lol
    Quote Originally Posted by drwx View Post
    I think we found the guy that tried to hit your handlebars while he was climbing.

    Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk

  96. #96
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    Sometimes you'll be riding up a 20' wide gravel road and the best line is a body check to the guy riding down on the opposite side.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  97. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fattyrider38 View Post
    I say hi to nearly every rider I pass, Ive noticed a lot lately that at least a couple people each ride just completely ignore that, they dont make eye contact, they dont look at me, they dont even say a word back in response, and no, they dont have wireless earbuds in their ears, and 3/4ths of them are mountain bikers, not hikers etc, I think people now a days are just assholes, or just dont care to be friendly, I dont know exactly why, but it sucks...
    I’d go along with that. Douchebaggery seems to be more and more common with each passing year.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    I’d go along with that. Douchebaggery seems to be more and more common with each passing year.
    Old Guy on Porch Shaking Fist Rant ahead:

    it's part of our culture now: "Everyone gets a trophy" / "You Can Do Whatever You Want" / "You Deserve It" / "Everyone Owes You" / "You Are Better Than Them" / "Take What You Want First" / "Bigger Is Better. Smaller Should Be Squashed"

    ....those mentalities are the prevailing mainstream American mind sets, and are killing our society. We have had 3 generations grow up in this world now. The mind sets of "You Get Out Of It What You Put Into It" / "We Are In This Together" / "Help Each Other" / and the biggest one : RESPECT - have gone by the way side.

    We live in the world of "Me", instead of "We" now...and it shows. Personally, it is so much better, but harder, to live in the world of We, because it takes maturity, humility and vulnerability to do it. People are afraid of those traits because they force you to be honest. They force you to think, and not just react.

    The world of "Me" is easier to live in because it takes no thought, no balls/courage, no brain power and no ownership. Recently, people have been trained to gravitate towards the easier thing to do...

    end Old Guy On Porch Shaking His Fist Rant

    when i am riding, I also always try to take the high road when interacting with other people. I don't ride under the guise of being someone I am not. If pausing or losing some time because of pausing for someone else causes you to lose millions of sponsorship dollars, I can see getting angry. If having to readjust your line on a trail causes you to lose millions of sponsorship dollars, I can see getting angry...

    no one who rides the trails I am on are riding for millions of dollars, (though some think that they are approaching that level.......) and these are few and far between, and are usually not directly douchy

    as mentioned before, I am lucky that our trails are one way for the most part. We have - or at least I have not - had many encounters to the negative from other bikers. And, the ones who have been going the wrong way always apologize, ask if they missed the direction sign, and then turn around.
    " ...the moonlit swamp Krampus is a king among bikes." - geraldooka

    15 Surly Krampus
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  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    Old Guy on Porch Shaking Fist Rant ahead:
    "This next generation is unlike any other before."

    -Every old dude in the history of old dudes.

  100. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDwayyo View Post
    "This next generation is unlike any other before."

    -Every old dude in the history of old dudes.
    "Get Off My Lawn"

    - Every old dude in the history of old dudes

    "I don't Like the Look of those Teenagers"
    - Grandpa Simpson
    " ...the moonlit swamp Krampus is a king among bikes." - geraldooka

    15 Surly Krampus
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