Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 100 of 106
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ninjichor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    488

    Things MTBers gradually learn the hard way

    List something that MTBers gradually learn the hard way.

    I'll start:

    Pedal strikes. This is something that is discovered to be a problem as you get a higher performance bike, typically full suspension. You'll likely will clip a pedal in a way that forces you off the bike, perhaps in a rock garden in which you tried to squeeze between two big rocks. You might question if it's something about the bike, but people will likely insist that it's user error and that technique and line choice is the proper solution.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ninjichor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    488
    Be careful with oil anywhere near brake pads, even if you're doing a bleed only through your brake levers, trimming a hydraulic line, carefully lubing your chain (aerosol), or even just spraying down the bike. Take the brake pads out, else you risk making a costly mistake, as contaminated brake pads will never work as good as fresh new ones. Rotors maybe, but I'd like to hear of a foolproof way to clean them that actually works. The time it takes to remove the pads is likely far less than the time it takes to earn the money to buy a new set, or the labor it takes to attempt to de-contaminate, or the time compromised by grief when riding without decent brake power.

    I've had this happen, and only managed to restore partial power through cleaning with brake/contact cleaner, 90% isopropyl alcohol, and ultrasonic... baking at high heat... just moved the partially working one to the rear of a bike that doesn't go as fast, and bought fresh pads and rotors.

  3. #3
    WillWorkForTrail
    Reputation: Cotharyus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    4,232
    Spending money on parts won't make you a better rider, only spending time on the bike will. Buying the lightest parts without the proper skills sometimes results in breaking a part that wouldn't have broken if it was a little heavier/stronger.

  4. #4
    Sneaker man
    Reputation: mik_git's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,691
    Always realise, when talking on the internet, that you are probably talking to someone on the other side of the planet who hasn't and probably never will ride the trails you're riding on, so always take on board when discussing what you "need" to use when riding.
    All the gear and no idea.

  5. #5
    Nat
    Nat is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    13,008
    Youíll waste a lot of time waiting for others to go riding.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    10,639
    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    Youíll waste a lot of time waiting for others to go riding.
    No, others will waste a lot of time waiting for me to go riding.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  7. #7
    the discerning hooligan
    Reputation: MOJO K's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,016
    The progression of skills and fitness is always an awesome climb, but it doesn't last forever. It's a sad, but inevitable thing that one day we'll find ourselves coasting down the back side of the mountain.
    MERCY! MERCY! MERCY!

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    71
    Gravity

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
    Will swerve for leaves.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    1,180
    Quote Originally Posted by MOJO K View Post
    The progression of skills and fitness is always an awesome climb
    Unless it is an endless plateau. Nothing awesome about that.


    Sent from my SM-P900 using Tapatalk

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    10,639
    Quote Originally Posted by andytiedye View Post
    Unless it is an endless plateau. Nothing awesome about that.

    At my age I'll take an endless plateau all day long, fitness wise anyway. Still foolishly optimistic that I can improve my skills though.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  11. #11
    Your Best Friend
    Reputation: Silentfoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    5,071
    It takes less than 2 weeks of not riding to lose serious fitness. It takes 4 months of riding to gain it back.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    I'm a mountain bike guide in southwest Utah

  12. #12
    beater
    Reputation: evasive's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5,328
    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    It takes less than 2 weeks of not riding to lose serious fitness. It takes 4 months of riding to gain it back.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    Truth.

    The biggest mental hurdle for beginners seems to be adjusting to the fact mountain biking is a very dynamic activity.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,576
    Fast-Action Wheelies

    Edit: Proper brake modulation during very steep, rutty downhills.
    Last edited by Pisgah; 1 Week Ago at 10:47 AM.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    100
    check the seat post / seat first when you think you hear a creak from the BB .. it is often the seat / seat post..

  15. #15
    tire to rim ratio tester
    Reputation: richj8990's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    1,344
    Quote Originally Posted by mik_git View Post
    Always realise, when talking on the internet, that you are probably talking to someone on the other side of the planet who hasn't and probably never will ride the trails you're riding on, so always take on board when discussing what you "need" to use when riding.
    lol

    Yeah so many people on here say they average 25 mph downhill. I finally have the hard data that the KOM's in my area are a whopping 16-18 mph. Easy to talk a big game on the internet.
    "A $1700 bike is not fit to be hucked from a curb"
    MTB B'Dos

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ninjichor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    488
    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    lol

    Yeah so many people on here say they average 25 mph downhill. I finally have the hard data that the KOM's in my area are a whopping 16-18 mph. Easy to talk a big game on the internet.
    A lot of Strava data is questionable. "Race" the owner of the KOM, not their stats. They'll often will come up with some context regarding how they got that one time, which often severely devalues it.

    I haven't averaged over 25 mph on any pedally segment over 2 minutes ever since I ditched my 2x10. My 1x drivetrain holds me back greatly. It probably works on heavy 29ers, but I'm on a 27.5 with 175mm cranks, spinning out at 25 mph. I struggle to pedal over 85 rpm out-of-the-saddle for longer than 5-10 seconds, and that's only if it's smooth.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    66
    That mountain biking is an addiction that makes heroin or meth addiction look like a mild craving for salt.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ninjichor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    488
    Progress tends to be proportional to how seriously you push your limits, though there's only a certain sized window of progress between plateauing and injury.

    Your progress plateaus if you keep adjusting the bike and riding style to better suit your current limits. Examples: avoiding riding with more advanced riders, focusing on comfort and ease with low gearing, fast rolling tires, plush suspension, low bike weight, and moderating your pace to keep things within your endurance/fitness/energy levels, or exaggerating the necessity of the recovery process by taking multiple full days off or avoiding two big rides 1 day after the next.

    Low gearing is rendered ineffective when it cannot generate momentum to get you through a rough/technical section of a climb that has pedal strike risks.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    10,639
    Quote Originally Posted by ninjichor View Post
    I haven't averaged over 25 mph on any pedally segment over 2 minutes ever since I ditched my 2x10. My 1x drivetrain holds me back greatly. It probably works on heavy 29ers, but I'm on a 27.5 with 175mm cranks, spinning out at 25 mph. I struggle to pedal over 85 rpm out-of-the-saddle for longer than 5-10 seconds, and that's only if it's smooth.

    Weird, going from 2x10 to 1x didn't slow me down at all. I've gotten tons of pr's after converting even on really fast segments.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  20. #20
    The perfessor
    Reputation: mr_chrome's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    695
    - ride the technical stuff of your local trails, it'll prepare you for other trails you haven't seen yet........
    Rigid 29er Ti SS / 29er SC Tallboy AL / Paketa Magnesium Road Bike

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    144
    Coming from a hardtail, I found that full suspension felt like you couldn't go too fast.
    You can.
    "I may not be fast descending, but I'm pretty slow climbing."

  22. #22
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,083
    Life is too short to ride a shitty bike
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    1,754
    This will most likely not be your last bike.

  24. #24
    beater
    Reputation: evasive's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5,328
    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    lol

    Yeah so many people on here say they average 25 mph downhill. I finally have the hard data that the KOM's in my area are a whopping 16-18 mph. Easy to talk a big game on the internet.
    Meh. On a pedally DH with some corners, thatís about right for an average. But I exceed 25 mph regularly on DH sections. Mid 30s arenít exceptional on straight segments with good sight lines. And Iím not fast.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    376
    The fun factor is not always a function of speed.
    Bicycles don't have motors.

  26. #26
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    4,624
    Quote Originally Posted by ninjichor View Post
    A lot of Strava data is questionable. "Race" the owner of the KOM, not their stats. They'll often will come up with some context regarding how they got that one time, which often severely devalues it.

    I haven't averaged over 25 mph on any pedally segment over 2 minutes ever since I ditched my 2x10. My 1x drivetrain holds me back greatly. It probably works on heavy 29ers, but I'm on a 27.5 with 175mm cranks, spinning out at 25 mph. I struggle to pedal over 85 rpm out-of-the-saddle for longer than 5-10 seconds, and that's only if it's smooth.
    Honest question: why haven't you changed it back?
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,250
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    The fun factor is not always a function of speed.
    this. so many discussions and analyses based on "my Strava time on this trail was faster with XXX bike/ part/ accessory, so it must be better." sometimes riding slower and taking more playful lines is more fun. I'm not winning any races, so I don't care if it's faster. it it's challenging enough to be fun, I'm good.

  28. #28
    Anytime. Anywhere.
    Reputation: Travis Bickle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,040
    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Life is too short to ride a shitty bike
    My favourite quote.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  29. #29
    jcd's best friend
    Reputation: Battery's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    1,159
    Get off your damn saddle.
    Trek | Octane One | Transition

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mr Pig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    10,315
    This is much harder than it looks on the YouTube videos.

  31. #31
    Interplanetary Poultry
    Reputation: scatterbrained's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    348
    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    lol

    Yeah so many people on here say they average 25 mph downhill. I finally have the hard data that the KOM's in my area are a whopping 16-18 mph. Easy to talk a big game on the internet.
    Are they saying they "average" 25mph, or that they "achieve" 25mph. Very big difference.
    Editor In Chief, "Internet Tough Guy Magazine"
    "Home of Chuck Norris' Keyboard"

  32. #32
    Interplanetary Poultry
    Reputation: scatterbrained's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    348
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    This is much harder than it looks on the YouTube videos.
    Ain't that true! "Man, this is a lot steeper than it looked on YouTube!"
    Editor In Chief, "Internet Tough Guy Magazine"
    "Home of Chuck Norris' Keyboard"

  33. #33
    Always in the wrong gear
    Reputation: ARandomBiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    2,218
    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    It takes less than 2 weeks of not riding to lose serious fitness. It takes 4 months of riding to gain it back.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    Truth. Time off the bike is devastating to fitness.

    I was 'forced' (work schedule/taking one for the team) to literally not ride a single pedal stroke for 14 weeks. My job is a lot of 'standing and watching'.

    I rode for the first time last weekend. I rode 7 miles, 200' of elevation, which took an hour to ride and I was so fatigued afterwards I took a 30 minute nap after I got home and showered.
    Donít modify the trail to match your skills, modify your skills to match the trails.

  34. #34
    Always in the wrong gear
    Reputation: ARandomBiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    2,218
    An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

    Most people have to learn the hard way to maintain a bike BEOFRE it fails.

    It's no fun working on a bike in blistering heat, freezing cold or driving rain, because "there's probably enough sealant left in the tires for today... the chain isn't that old, I've never had a linkage bolt back out before, I'll figure out that creak another day, etc.


    Walking any amount of miles back to the car sucks when 10 minutes of "check-over" with a rag and a wrench could have caught it.
    Donít modify the trail to match your skills, modify your skills to match the trails.

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jeremy3220's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    946
    Everything. MTBers are bad about practicing skills. It's not uncommon for mountain bikers to ride for years or decades without ever learning basic skills like bunny hopping, cornering technique, proper body position, how to jump, etc.

    Go find any kid who has rode BMX for more than 6 months. They have a better bunny hop 90% of mountain bikers.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    174
    1. Every new bike that comes out is 'the best bike ever made' and gets rave reviews by exceptional riders. It is well worth the money and time to demo as many bikes as possible on your local trails before spending thousands on a bike only to learn that you made the wrong purchase after a few months.
    2. Your skills may or may not translate to other trails in different locations.
    3. Altitude will humble you if you ride at sea level.

  37. #37
    Not helpful.
    Reputation: Finch Platte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    15,480
    Nothing about driving into the garage with your bike on the car roof?
    I wouldn't even get my hair cut except it's near the liquor store and it seems like my eyebrows need trimming now and then.

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ninjichor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    488
    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Honest question: why haven't you changed it back?
    I learned about the effects that chainring size plays on anti-squat on my FS bike, and my only HT is singlespeed, and I only do road for commuting lately (on my mtbs).

    You don't realize what you've missed until you re-try it. I had the ability to push big gears when riding road, but got scared away from riding those things around traffic. When I hopped back on a SRAM Red equipped skinny tire bike, I could only push the climbing end of the cassette in the big ring on flat pavement. My average speed was decent enough to keep up with an advanced shop ride (B group, which averages 16+ mph, not the A group full of sponsored pros which can average 22+), but my sprinting ability is an absolute joke, now that I've gone full MTB and settled with 1x and not using susp lock-outs. Getting over 35 mph through pedal power was a reality if you merely invested time to progress on bigger gears.

    P.S. there's plenty of legit sections where an average rider on an emtb wouldn't beat a legit KOM set by a normal bike, due to the average speed exceeding the motor cutoff. But I live where Eric Carter, Aaron Gwin, and a number of other fast riders also live. Champs like Loic Bruni come to play here in the offseason. Used to get names like Wyn Masters and Gee Atherton pop up, due to the Winter Series races, which is no longer a hot attraction. The segments that have average speeds under 20 mph are being contested by entries dated '17 and '18, but segments that have average speeds over 25 were all set around 2015 with few exceptions, which correlates with the death of the FD. Basically, I'm trying to say that I'm not surprised by these times/speeds. I keep up with local expert class riders on gravity oriented segments, but the world class pros put 20+ seconds over my times over 2 minutes.

  39. #39
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: AshevilleMTB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    1,793
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    This is much harder than it looks on the YouTube videos.
    Haha, yeah!

    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    It takes less than 2 weeks of not riding to lose serious fitness. It takes 4 months of riding to gain it back.
    It looks like I'm going to get hammered next week after a long pause.

  40. #40
    mbtr member
    Reputation: scottzg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    5,080
    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    It takes less than 2 weeks of not riding to lose serious fitness. It takes 4 months of riding to gain it back.
    This is the real cost of my MS. Prolly won't ever get back there.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation: thecanoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,335
    Living in Massachusetts, if you wait for good weather to ride, youíll never ride.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Santa Cruz Tallboy
    Moonlander

  42. #42
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    32,486
    Friends either hold you up or you hold them up, rarely two riding partners ride the same pace with the same stamina, skill and fitness level.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ravewoofer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    374
    True dat. Mostly ride solo because of this. I donít mind as I can focus on technique, speed and the sound of the woods.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  44. #44
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    4,624
    Quote Originally Posted by Finch Platte View Post
    Nothing about driving into the garage with your bike on the car roof?
    The guy I rode with this weekend didn't learn, he's done that twice. Ok, maybe he has gradually learned, it's been a few years.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    224
    Don't look at what you're trying to avoid.

    Ride with light hands and heavy feet.
    2018 Guerrilla Gravity Trail Pistol XXL
    2016 Fuse Pro XXL 29er

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    10,639
    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Friends either hold you up or you hold them up, rarely two riding partners ride the same pace with the same stamina, skill and fitness level.

    I don't mind being held up.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    62
    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    Everything. MTBers are bad about practicing skills. It's not uncommon for mountain bikers to ride for years or decades without ever learning basic skills like bunny hopping, cornering technique, proper body position, how to jump, etc.

    Go find any kid who has rode BMX for more than 6 months. They have a better bunny hop 90% of mountain bikers.
    So much truth to this. I built a BMX and have been messing around on it in the backyard/ driveway for the past month or so and my skills on the MTB are developing much quicker now. IMO more mountainbikers should buy a BMX/dirt jumper to mess around in the park/ street.

  48. #48
    Professional Crastinator
    Reputation: Fleas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    5,172
    Quote Originally Posted by mr_chrome View Post
    - ride the technical stuff of your local trails, it'll prepare you for other trails you haven't seen yet........
    Quote Originally Posted by drich View Post
    ...
    2. Your skills may or may not translate to other trails in different locations.
    ...
    ================================================== ===================================
    ^^^If you only ride your local trails, you haven't seen enough terrain to be a really good rider.



    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Friends either hold you up or you hold them up, rarely two riding partners ride the same pace with the same stamina, skill and fitness level.
    True, but it can be really fun when different riders are better at different things and your overall average speed jives perfectly. Let the climber climb first. Let the descender descend first. Let the rock hound lead the rock crawls. Sooo much fun!


    Add: Acorns collect in the low spots - usually right in the apex.

    And: Dry or wet, leaves are really slippery.

    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 6280's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    111
    You will forget your shoes at home
    You will forget your helmet at home
    You will go back to get both and leave one on the roof of your car


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  50. #50
    One ring to mash them all
    Reputation: the one ring's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    1,045
    You don't need the whole freakin' multi-tool.
    All Li es Matter

  51. #51
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    1,186
    Ride alone, because people suck and are flaky. Also, getting old does suck.

  52. #52
    Nothing seems to kill me
    Reputation: CUP-TON's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    673
    Recovery time is as important to fitness as riding time. Especially for us old phucks.
    Twilight falls upon old souls darkening our skin & bone.Soon I'll follow Prudence home until then just let me chase this sun

  53. #53
    Interplanetary Poultry
    Reputation: scatterbrained's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    348
    Quote Originally Posted by Finch Platte View Post
    Nothing about driving into the garage with your bike on the car roof?
    Or forgetting to put the front tire in the car?

    Yep, I've backed over my front tire before.
    Editor In Chief, "Internet Tough Guy Magazine"
    "Home of Chuck Norris' Keyboard"

  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BlueCheesehead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    803
    Wood boardwalks that are wet are slick as snot.

  55. #55
    slow
    Reputation: sgltrak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5,373
    Replace the chain more often than you think is necessary, and more often than the chain stretch indicator tool recommends.

  56. #56
    Barely in control
    Reputation: Schulze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    1,717
    Quote Originally Posted by ninjichor View Post
    I learned about the effects that chainring size plays on anti-squat on my FS bike, and my only HT is singlespeed, and I only do road for commuting lately (on my mtbs).

    You don't realize what you've missed until you re-try it. I had the ability to push big gears when riding road, but got scared away from riding those things around traffic. When I hopped back on a SRAM Red equipped skinny tire bike, I could only push the climbing end of the cassette in the big ring on flat pavement. My average speed was decent enough to keep up with an advanced shop ride (B group, which averages 16+ mph, not the A group full of sponsored pros which can average 22+), but my sprinting ability is an absolute joke, now that I've gone full MTB and settled with 1x and not using susp lock-outs. Getting over 35 mph through pedal power was a reality if you merely invested time to progress on bigger gears.
    Agree. The conclusion I've learned the hard way is that you can only (barely) maintain fitness riding a mountain bike. If you want to maintain or increase your power you need to ride a road bike. It's just not possible on a mountain bike because the effort is spread over your upper and lower body. Your heart rate is high and you're huffing and puffing but you're not stressing your legs enough to keep them in shape.

  57. #57
    mtbr member
    Reputation: derrapancio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    62
    Quote Originally Posted by cup-ton View Post
    recovery time is as important to fitness as riding time. Especially for us old phucks.
    a-men!

  58. #58
    BM and PQ Trail Rep
    Reputation: bankerboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    1,798
    It will always take longer than you want and cost more than you have.
    The world does not revolve around you but your actions impact us all!

  59. #59
    Your Best Friend
    Reputation: Silentfoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    5,071
    Buying your next bike will cost more than you budgeted.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    I'm a mountain bike guide in southwest Utah

  60. #60
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    961

    Things MTBers gradually learn the hard way

    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    Agree. The conclusion I've learned the hard way is that you can only (barely) maintain fitness riding a mountain bike. If you want to maintain or increase your power you need to ride a road bike. It's just not possible on a mountain bike because the effort is spread over your upper and lower body. Your heart rate is high and you're huffing and puffing but you're not stressing your legs enough to keep them in shape.
    You MEAN ride your bike on the road, not ride a road bike.

    I get sick of hearing the statement you posted because it confuses new people into wasting money on a road bike when they could just have a second mountain bike.

    I average up to 18 mph solo on 30 mile rides on my MTB Centuries get down to 16. Also the tires I run have very little effect at this speed(another lesson tested and learned. Aerodynamics is the biggest factor.
    I have a hardtail with a 38x10 gearing for my training bike that I use for non rocky race courses as well. Iíve put Schwalbe Big One 500 gram slicks on it and itís barely faster at speed. It does however get sketchy AF. The big chainring is there so I could ride in a paceline and comfortably spin at 25 mph. It does not improve my average speeds.

    The only reason to have the road bike if you are going to do group road rides in the B+ and A groups.

    This is the statement people should use. Riding hard roadie group rides will make you faster.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  61. #61
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Gasp4Air's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    3,226
    The saddle can kick your ass right off the bike.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  62. #62
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    10,639
    Quote Originally Posted by FJSnoozer View Post
    The only reason to have the road bike if you are going to do group road rides in the B+ and A groups.

    There are other reasons. For one I love the feel of a nice road bike on smooth pavement, mountain bikes are nice but it isn't the same experience. For sure I can average several mph faster on my road bike too, and not because of the gearing.

    I agree that you can get a fine workout on a mtb though, no need for a road bike for that.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  63. #63
    mtbr member
    Reputation: screamingbunny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    801
    when you don't know which way to go, go up hill. If its the wrong way, at least its down hill on the way back.

  64. #64
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    3,153
    I've personally found little translates between road biking and mountain biking beyond basic fitness. Infact I'm faster in peak season if I stay off the road bike as it works my muscles differently. I get more out of an upper body gym workout for mountain biking. I'm sure this is dependent on how and where you ride, and probably on how you're built. With that l like the power transfer on road bikes, feels awesome. That and long sweeping turns at speed on smooth roads.

    Regarding what took me a while to learn is pacing my campfire beers the night before a big ride. Wait, I haven't learned much there yet.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  65. #65
    Nat
    Nat is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    13,008
    Donít eat too much (e.g., a half pound roast beef sandwich) in one sitting during a ride, unless you want to take a nap and be worthless afterwards.

  66. #66
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    62
    Quote Originally Posted by FJSnoozer View Post
    You MEAN ride your bike on the road, not ride a road bike.

    I get sick of hearing the statement you posted because it confuses new people into wasting money on a road bike when they could just have a second mountain bike.

    The only reason to have the road bike if you are going to do group road rides in the B+ and A groups.

    This is the statement people should use. Riding hard roadie group rides will make you faster.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I am buying a hardtail and an extra rear wheel to mount a slick on soon so to use on a trainer cause personally I have neither the time nor the interest in road riding. If it is light outside (or even if it isn't an I can get some lights) and I can't ride trails, I'd much rather play on my BMX. Which to me seems way more useful for the type I riding I want to move towards.

    (get tired of people telling me to buy a road bike)

  67. #67
    Nothing seems to kill me
    Reputation: CUP-TON's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    673
    1)Riding on wet leaves covering wet moss covered rocks is like riding (falling) on ice.

    B)There is a rock lurking in the tall grass next to the fast flowy trail, that rock has your pedals name on it.

    3) For Christ sake, COMMIT!!
    Twilight falls upon old souls darkening our skin & bone.Soon I'll follow Prudence home until then just let me chase this sun

  68. #68
    One ring to mash them all
    Reputation: the one ring's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    1,045
    Quote Originally Posted by CUP-TON View Post
    1)Riding on wet leaves covering wet moss covered rocks is like riding (falling) on ice.

    B)There is a rock lurking in the tall grass next to the fast flowy trail, that rock has your pedals name on it.

    3) For Christ sake, COMMIT!!
    [fore] There is a stump lurking in the leaf pile at the foot of that steep rock roll, that has your front wheel's name on it.
    All Li es Matter

  69. #69
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    124
    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    Everything. MTBers are bad about practicing skills. It's not uncommon for mountain bikers to ride for years or decades without ever learning basic skills like bunny hopping, cornering technique, proper body position, how to jump, etc.

    Go find any kid who has rode BMX for more than 6 months. They have a better bunny hop 90% of mountain bikers.
    Yep. I'm that guy. Rode XC like stuff for over a decade without learning to bunny hop, jump or take drops. A year of working on those skills completely changed my riding. My fat, out of shape @ss is way faster on the downs now and has a ton more fun.

    I want to go back in time and kick my own butt until I learn all that 15 years ago...

  70. #70
    Nothing seems to kill me
    Reputation: CUP-TON's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    673
    PRD- especially on the desert rides, because a prickly pear is not "Cover". And no one needs to see that..
    Twilight falls upon old souls darkening our skin & bone.Soon I'll follow Prudence home until then just let me chase this sun

  71. #71
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    32,486
    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    Donít eat too much (e.g., a half pound roast beef sandwich) in one sitting during a ride, unless you want to take a nap and be worthless afterwards.
    Fat Bike advice:
    Donít eat yellow snow. A road [trail] less traveled in the winter is your friend indeed.

    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  72. #72
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ALimon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    802
    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I don't mind being held up.
    I mind less when sheís good looking

  73. #73
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sturge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    799
    When you first start out, gaining experience allows you to get better, ride faster, clean more challenging terrain, push your abilities, etc. As time goes on experience factors in consequences, a few crashes and some injuries.

    At some point you become VERY experienced and not as interested in pushing your limits. You are now 100% focused on getting in a good ride AND avoiding crashes/injury. Becoming VERY experienced is critical if you want to continue to ride as you get older.
    12 Santa Cruz Heckler
    18 Kona Process 153 AL/DL (27.5)...

  74. #74
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jeremy3220's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    946
    Quote Originally Posted by mrallen View Post
    Yep. I'm that guy. Rode XC like stuff for over a decade without learning to bunny hop, jump or take drops. A year of working on those skills completely changed my riding. My fat, out of shape @ss is way faster on the downs now and has a ton more fun.

    I want to go back in time and kick my own butt until I learn all that 15 years ago...
    And I realize not everyone is going to be sending it big and doing crazy stunts but just learning to hop, hit some small jumps and having good bike-body separation will totally change your riding experience.

  75. #75
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    71
    Poison ivy is not your friend.
    Will swerve for leaves.

  76. #76
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    1,754
    You should always pack toilet paper.

  77. #77
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mr Pig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    10,315
    Don't pass up a chance to ride because you'll be injured, old or dead quicker than you think.

  78. #78
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Gasp4Air's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    3,226
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Don't pass up a chance to ride because you'll be injured, old or dead quicker than you think.
    Been injured, already old, so that leaves... oh crap.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  79. #79
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    124
    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    And I realize not everyone is going to be sending it big and doing crazy stunts but just learning to hop, hit some small jumps and having good bike-body separation will totally change your riding experience.
    Exactly. Being able to drop and hop takes that section of trail that was a hike a bike because of the inevitable OTB moment into a fun fast segment.

  80. #80
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    124
    No matter what your skill level is, looking down the trail will make you instantly better.

  81. #81
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Crankout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2,728
    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    There are other reasons. For one I love the feel of a nice road bike on smooth pavement, mountain bikes are nice but it isn't the same experience. For sure I can average several mph faster on my road bike too, and not because of the gearing.

    I agree that you can get a fine workout on a mtb though, no need for a road bike for that.
    Yup. I find myself spending the majority of my rides with the road or gravel bike. I still consider myself a mtb'r, but found a love for the road and off-road-but-not-pure-singletrack terrain.
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

  82. #82
    Barely in control
    Reputation: Schulze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    1,717
    Quote Originally Posted by FJSnoozer View Post
    You MEAN ride your bike on the road, not ride a road bike.

    I get sick of hearing the statement you posted because it confuses new people into wasting money on a road bike when they could just have a second mountain bike.

    I average up to 18 mph solo on 30 mile rides on my MTB Centuries get down to 16. Also the tires I run have very little effect at this speed(another lesson tested and learned. Aerodynamics is the biggest factor.
    I have a hardtail with a 38x10 gearing for my training bike that I use for non rocky race courses as well. Iíve put Schwalbe Big One 500 gram slicks on it and itís barely faster at speed. It does however get sketchy AF. The big chainring is there so I could ride in a paceline and comfortably spin at 25 mph. It does not improve my average speeds.

    The only reason to have the road bike if you are going to do group road rides in the B+ and A groups.

    This is the statement people should use. Riding hard roadie group rides will make you faster.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Eh, ok. I ride both on the road.

  83. #83
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,250
    The way that pros set up there bikes is usually as applicable to your riding as the car that an F1 drivers uses is applicable to your daily drive to work.

  84. #84
    Gigantic Hawk
    Reputation: dubthang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,500
    -Stickers make your bike faster.

    -Beer is the best way to finish off a ride.

  85. #85
    Bicycles aren't motorized
    Reputation: life behind bars's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    3,770
    E-motorbikes are the work of Satan.
    It ain't supposed to be easy.

    Make
    America
    Gravel
    Again

  86. #86
    mbtr member
    Reputation: scottzg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    5,080
    Quote Originally Posted by life behind bars View Post
    E-motorbikes are the work of Satan.
    I bet you'd feel differently if they were (correctly) classified as mopeds. I know i'd find them much more appealing.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  87. #87
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    100
    you will complete a hard ride crash free and then crash in the parking lot after the ride..

  88. #88
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ALimon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    802
    Quote Originally Posted by life behind bars View Post
    E-motorbikes are the work of Satan.
    Satan doesnít have anything to do with a bicycle

  89. #89
    Bikesexual
    Reputation: jcd46's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    5,892
    N+1

    Variety is a good thing!
    The Orange Fleet:

    '16 SC Heckler
    '14 All City MMD
    '12 Kona Unit Rigid

  90. #90
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    4,624
    Quote Originally Posted by ALimon View Post
    Satan doesnít have anything to do with a bicycle
    That's right, he has an ebike to get around.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

  91. #91
    Nat
    Nat is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    13,008
    e-bikes are actually a kick-in-the-pants.










    [runs for cover]

  92. #92
    mtbr member
    Reputation: azimiut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    489
    when you see a snake on the trail, every stick after that is a snake. then you get over it until there is another snake.
    Study nature, love nature, stay close to nature. It will never fail you.
    Frank Lloyd Wright

  93. #93
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ALimon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    802
    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    e-bikes are actually a kick-in-the-pants.










    [runs for cover]

    I agree!

  94. #94
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    113
    A bad day on the bike is not always better than a good day in the office, especially when you are older.

  95. #95
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    10,639
    It's not the bike.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  96. #96
    Land of the 230+
    Reputation: GuitsBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    2,299
    Everyone I ride with has had to learn the hard way that I will never ever show up at the agreed upon meet time.

    However I will always have ice cold homebrew for the post ride festivities. Seems this buys me a little leeway.

  97. #97
    passed out in your garden
    Reputation: cmg71's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    2,048
    that you are actually not that good.
    always mad and usually drunk......

  98. #98
    Nothing seems to kill me
    Reputation: CUP-TON's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    673
    Quote Originally Posted by cmg71 View Post
    that you are actually not that good.
    Or that bad, it's all relative.
    Twilight falls upon old souls darkening our skin & bone.Soon I'll follow Prudence home until then just let me chase this sun

  99. #99
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    32,486
    That you have to have larger than life wheels and new geometry to have any kind of fun.



    Signed: WhoFlungPoo
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  100. #100
    mtbr member
    Reputation: azimiut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    489
    If your way faster than your friends your not that good. They are just that slow.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 12-13-2012, 04:31 PM
  2. Replies: 21
    Last Post: 06-22-2012, 07:36 AM
  3. I hate learning things the hard way..... MRP
    By MorphineAddict in forum Downhill - Freeride
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 03-15-2005, 12:07 AM
  4. Grimeca disks gradually get tighter!
    By EABiker in forum Brake Time
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-24-2004, 11:53 AM

Members who have read this thread: 365

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

mtbr.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.