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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by ALimon View Post
    Satan doesnít have anything to do with a bicycle




    Neither does a e-motorbike.
    Wanted, SRAM GX 2x11 rear derailleur

    It ain't supposed to be easy.

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    If your way faster than your friends your not that good. They are just that slow.
    No matter how much time people spend writing and communicating on forums, they never learn the difference between you're and your.

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  3. #103
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    That's not a mtb thing. That's a I hate my phone auto correct thing.

    It's a gradual thing but some day I'll learn.

    Things MTBers gradually learn the hard way-theiyrre-760x500.jpg

  4. #104
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    There are only two kinds of mountain bike riders: those that have had a fairly serious injury from an accident and those that are going to have a serious injury accident.

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by SportzNutt View Post
    There are only two kinds of mountain bike riders: those that have had a fairly serious injury from an accident and those that are going to have a serious injury accident.
    Taken directly from the motorcycle world. Thanks so much for that tidbit of wisdom.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasp4Air View Post
    Been injured, already old, so that leaves... oh crap.
    Your username makes this post extra hilarious!
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  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    It takes less than 2 weeks of not riding to lose serious fitness. It takes 4 months of riding to gain it back.
    I read this a few weeks ago and discovered the horrible truth of it all. I spent the past two months barely riding at all because of the constant rain we had here and work obligations. I also had been going to the gym for just 30 minutes a day to do some core work and fell off that wagon too. Then I went to a relatively easy nearby trail the other day and did what would usually be considered a mellow 90 minute ride. everything hurts! I had been very lazy and paid the price.

    tip to new riders:

    if you can't ride, do something else to keep your fitness level up! stretch, strength training, running, walking... do whatever it takes to strengthen your body.

  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by SportzNutt View Post
    There are only two kinds of mountain bike riders: those that have had a fairly serious injury from an accident and those that are going to have a serious injury accident.
    I donít know about that. I raced Moto and broke a shit load of bones. Mountain biking can be hazardous, injuries happen, in most cases you just lose skin. Whereas Moto has a way of popping bones through the skin, paralysis and death.

  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by ALimon View Post
    I donít know about that. I raced Moto and broke a shit load of bones. Mountain biking can be hazardous, injuries happen, in most cases you just lose skin. Whereas Moto has a way of popping bones through the skin, paralysis and death.



    True, higher speed=greater chance of serious injury but getting hurled into a rock garden @20mph offers plenty opportunity to break skin & bone so if you push it the risk factor can still be significant.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    True, higher speed=greater chance of serious injury but getting hurled into a rock garden @20mph offers plenty opportunity to break skin & bone so if you push it the risk factor can still be significant.
    No doubt about it. Most of the guys I know that have been seriously injured on a mtb have been rather inexpierenced with an ego. You know the saying... ďdonít let your ego write checks that your skills canít cashĒ. Lots of truth right there.

  11. #111
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    Tuck your shoe laces in, donít even test a bike in loose hiking pants by your driveway. ( pants leg got caught and went down like I was clipped in in the road)
    The bike is more capable then you are

  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finch Platte View Post
    Nothing about driving into the garage with your bike on the car roof?
    No but close. I drove into my garage with my hitch dual-bike rack still attached... and closed the garage door. In the end, I not only had to replace my garage door but also my rack
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  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by ARandomBiker View Post
    Truth. Time off the bike is devastating to fitness.

    I was 'forced' (work schedule/taking one for the team) to literally not ride a single pedal stroke for 14 weeks. My job is a lot of 'standing and watching'.

    I rode for the first time last weekend. I rode 7 miles, 200' of elevation, which took an hour to ride and I was so fatigued afterwards I took a 30 minute nap after I got home and showered.


    I bought an indoor trainer, a Keiser M3, that is really nothing but a rack with pedals and a minimal screen. It's pretty high quality, though. I'm kind of in your shoes in the sense that I have to commute an hour each way to work and work 10 or 12-hour shifts which seriously erodes my ride time.

    An hour-and-half on the trainer with a heart rate of 145 at 200 watts will keep you in shape. It has really helped me on real rides, as well. And I always have time for that.

    Plus we just moved to Michigan and my enthusiasm for sub-zero rides is very low (but I have had a few great fatbike rides this fall in the snow. Once I get out there I enjoy it...getting motivated is the problem.

  14. #114
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    I have learned that I am not a very good mountain-biker. I'm not terribly fast, don't do a lot of jumps, and am often defeated by technical features of trails and often (always) go around rock gardens. I like to ride but I don't want to crash, either.

    I am also not a very good gravel rider. I'm too heavy and and I don't like road bike geometry or small diameter tires so I also ride heavier bikes. I am a lot slower than most people. Since I want to do the Tour Divide in 2020 (I scratched last time from lack of fitness) I am working on this.

  15. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ailuropoda View Post
    I have learned that I am not a very good mountain-biker. I'm not terribly fast, don't do a lot of jumps, and am often defeated by technical features of trails and often (always) go around rock gardens. I like to ride but I don't want to crash, either.

    I am also not a very good gravel rider. I'm too heavy and and I don't like road bike geometry or small diameter tires so I also ride heavier bikes. I am a lot slower than most people. Since I want to do the Tour Divide in 2020 (I scratched last time from lack of fitness) I am working on this.
    So youíre honest. Refreshing thing to hear around here.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    So youíre honest. Refreshing thing to hear around here.
    I was going to say the same thing!

    If you enjoy yourself, that's the main thing.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

  17. #117
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    I tend to not look farther down the trail for my lines but tend to focus about ten or so feet in front of me which can put me in some questionable situations. I constantly have to remind myself to look farther down the trail, and I do have a tendency to let my mind wander on trails that I frequent unless I am looking to try some new lines.

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  18. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ailuropoda View Post
    I have learned that I am not a very good mountain-biker. I'm not terribly fast, don't do a lot of jumps, and am often defeated by technical features of trails and often (always) go around rock gardens. I like to ride but I don't want to crash, either.

    I am also not a very good gravel rider. I'm too heavy and and I don't like road bike geometry or small diameter tires so I also ride heavier bikes. I am a lot slower than most people. Since I want to do the Tour Divide in 2020 (I scratched last time from lack of fitness) I am working on this.
    There's more to being a "good" biker than speed, technical proficiency or cool equipment. Riding responsibly, being helpful to others, doing trail maintenance, working on goals: these all count for a lot in my view. And you get points just for being out there.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  19. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasp4Air View Post
    There's more to being a "good" biker than speed, technical proficiency or cool equipment. Riding responsibly, being helpful to others, doing trail maintenance, working on goals: these all count for a lot in my view. And you get points just for being out there and eating PB&J sammiches on your breaks.

    I agree with all that and added some.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  20. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    I agree with all that and added some.
    Jeez, how could I forget that?
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  21. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasp4Air View Post
    Jeez, how could I forget that?
    Itís often overlooked, no worries.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  22. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasp4Air View Post
    And you get points just for being out there.
    Anybody who is outside doing something physical gets major points in my book. Sometimes (rollerblades are a good example) I have a knee-jerk reaction to judge someone based on my personal preferences, but then stop and remind myself that they actively chose to get out and do something when they could have stayed at home watching TV.

  23. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    The fun factor is not always a function of speed.
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    I once had an awkward moment just to see how it felt

  24. #124
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    I don't know if this has been mentioned, but I learned the long and hard way to leave the parking lot feeling cold during the winter months. In fact, these days when I start pedaling in the winter I'm shivering.

    Whenever I begin a ride in the winter months feeling warm, later in the ride I feel like I'm being smothered.

  25. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pisgah View Post
    I don't know if this has been mentioned, but I learned the long and hard way to leave the parking lot feeling cold during the winter months. In fact, these days when I start pedaling in the winter I'm shivering.

    Whenever I begin a ride in the winter months feeling warm, later in the ride I feel like I'm being smothered.
    Yeah, amazing how much heat our bodies create when exercising. Also, don't stop for long when it is cold, otherwise, you cool off and your sweat turns cold, which is another reason not to overdress causing you to sweat more. I'm also a trail runner and I've found that even below freezing, I'll end up having to take my gloves off as my hands get so hot.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

  26. #126
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    Speaking of cold weather riding, I have learned to not only ďstart coldĒ as has been pointed out but to manage layers. Even in cold weather I can strip down to a base layer and a wind shell and still feel warm. Then you have several warm and dry layers to put on when you stop.

    Especially important for bikepacking. Critical and life saving, even.

    I have also learned not to trust anything advertised as ďwaterproof,Ē even from reputable manufactures. I bought an expensive North Face jacket that was advertised as waterproof and breathable that was neither. Soaked through in about two hours of steady rain. Almost got hypothermia.

    Also...wool is the best material for cold weather riding. The best synthetic Underarmor-type base layers have nothing on no-name Merino wool. Not only does it wick moisture but it stays relatively warm even when wet. I generally wear a wool baselayer, a fleece zip-up, a down liner, and a waterproof shell for wind and rain.

  27. #127
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    see ya all later!
    Last edited by usuallylost; 1 Week Ago at 05:00 PM.

  28. #128
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    Distilled down to the most basic elements, mountain biking is simply a way to transport yourself through a wide range of terrain using a rolling wheel & tire. Everything else between you and the wheel(s), is a mere interface device, with two important goals:

    1) to ensure you're transported to where you want to go confidently and reliably, within your ability.
    2) to assist the rolling wheel & tire in handling the forces it will see, so that it's not overwhelmed when ridden progressively harder as rider fitness and skill progresses.

    Looking at bikes this way, my perspective in all the controversial disputes about bike design have been easily placed on one side of the argument vs the other, favoring anything that best supports the two points above. As such, I'm totally open to bikes (as a whole system) tuned to have lateral/torsional flex, if it proves to perform better, while others are throwing a huge fit (dramatically strong negative emotions/reactions) about it. I'm open to tires that weigh 1000+g, if the level of riding demands it. I'm not at all surprised/shocked that the gravity side of things are becoming more "moto/MX-like", at that the XC side of things are moving away from the road side and more towards the gravity side.

    While I may have seemingly opened up to many questionable things, what I've closed myself more off to is intolerance itself. I now actively try not to let the hate/intolerance, especially the kind only fueled by speculation and fear of change/unknown, get a response out of me.

    -----

    Applying this wisdom to my own purposes, I've stopped trying to make my bike into something it was not intended for. I've stopped myself from trading away versatility and set-and-forget simplicity, for the purpose of being more efficient at a specialized task (faster times on a certain kind of course). I instead find sort of a synergistic balance, with a more pragmatic goal in mind.

    I put more value into how easy the bike, as a tool, is to live with, which I call the ownership experience. This is not something like a warranty; it's much more than that: feeling content that there's not much to worry about, a supportive feel in case something does go wrong, and a form of comfort in which it eliminates sources of stress that demand more work out of you.

    I spent quite a bit of trial-and-error with purchases, getting the equivalent of super model dates in bike form, which had strong personalities, but in the end were not keepers who I could settle down with. Expensive lessons...

  29. #129
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    Prepare for thy shin bashing and forever ugly legs with non-sticky flat pedal shoes.

    Things MTBers gradually learn the hard way-shinb.jpg
    All you have to do when you fall is to get back up

  30. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by demonbydesign View Post
    Prepare for thy shin bashing and forever ugly legs with non-sticky flat pedal shoes.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    And then thereís the shin of a clipless pedal rider.

    Things MTBers gradually learn the hard way-9122fbab-7b9d-4755-88d1-647291e38662.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  31. #131
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    Things MTBers gradually learn the hard way

    Wanted, SRAM GX 2x11 rear derailleur

    It ain't supposed to be easy.

  32. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by demonbydesign View Post
    Prepare for thy shin bashing and forever ugly legs with non-sticky flat pedal shoes.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Even with 510s my shins look like that usually.
    Niner WFO9, Sunday Soundwave (BMX), Nashbar CXSS (town/workout/gravel)

  33. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by demonbydesign View Post
    Prepare for thy shin bashing and forever ugly legs with non-sticky flat pedal shoes.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Are we uploading snapshots of our sexy scarred up legs now? This thread has gone off the rails more than once now lol. Ok, wait 'til you guys see my pizza legs!
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  34. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by 93EXCivic View Post
    I am buying a hardtail and an extra rear wheel to mount a slick on soon so to use on a trainer cause personally I have neither the time nor the interest in road riding. If it is light outside (or even if it isn't an I can get some lights) and I can't ride trails, I'd much rather play on my BMX. Which to me seems way more useful for the type I riding I want to move towards.

    (get tired of people telling me to buy a road bike)
    get a direct drive trainer and you dont need the rear wheel. I bought a fork mount and mounted it to some wood so I dont need the front wheel either. Also dont need brakes.

    App controlled trainers are mindblowingly useful. You can get used wahoo kickrs for about 600 in my area. Excellent investment and makes my limited riding time so much more enjoyable.

  35. #135
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    You dont need to constantly buy a new bike. The newest technology doesnt necessarily make for a better ride.

  36. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by FJSnoozer View Post
    You MEAN ride your bike on the road, not ride a road bike.

    I get sick of hearing the statement you posted because it confuses new people into wasting money on a road bike when they could just have a second mountain bike.

    I average up to 18 mph solo on 30 mile rides on my MTB Centuries get down to 16. Also the tires I run have very little effect at this speed(another lesson tested and learned. Aerodynamics is the biggest factor.
    I have a hardtail with a 38x10 gearing for my training bike that I use for non rocky race courses as well. Iíve put Schwalbe Big One 500 gram slicks on it and itís barely faster at speed. It does however get sketchy AF. The big chainring is there so I could ride in a paceline and comfortably spin at 25 mph. It does not improve my average speeds.

    The only reason to have the road bike if you are going to do group road rides in the B+ and A groups.

    This is the statement people should use. Riding hard roadie group rides will make you faster.


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    This entire statement is hilarious. Literally every sentence has at least one giggle.

  37. #137
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    Not sure if this is something learned gradually or suddenly, but breaking your ribs sucks and will hurt for months.

    Also slowing down doesn't make you any safer.

  38. #138
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    Something I've learned as the years have passed....

    I don't mind people making dedicated bike parks in the woods for those so inclined.
    I do mind when those same people assume that everyone else wants contrived jumps to be built in the middle of every piece of singletrack.

  39. #139
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    That showing up to trail work days is very rewarding. Talk about a good way to meet some good people, and riding buddies. Lots of folks avoid trail work like it's a sickness.

  40. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_D00d View Post
    ...breaking your ribs sucks and will hurt for months.
    True

    Quote Originally Posted by The_D00d View Post
    Also slowing down doesn't make you any safer.
    No doubt there are some conditions where this is true, but generally speaking, falling down while going fast is going to hurt more than falling at a slower speed. How often do you hear that someone crashed due to excess slowness?
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  41. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasp4Air View Post
    No doubt there are some conditions where this is true, but generally speaking, falling down while going fast is going to hurt more than falling at a slower speed. How often do you hear that someone crashed due to excess slowness?
    LOL, yep! Iíve crashed numerous times on bikes, motorcycles, jet skis, downhill skiing etc. The higher speed crashes tend to hurt more and cause the more severe trauma. Itís just the law of physics.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  42. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    The higher speed crashes tend to hurt more and cause the more severe trauma. Itís just the law of physics.
    Well, butter my butt and call me toast.

  43. #143
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finch Platte View Post
    Well, butter my butt and call me toast.
    Didn't Professor Marvel (the Wizard) say that in the Wizard of Oz?
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  44. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    LOL, yep! Iíve crashed numerous times on bikes, motorcycles, jet skis, downhill skiing etc. The higher speed crashes tend to hurt more and cause the more severe trauma. Itís just the law of physics.
    Yup! 1/2 M * Vsquared.

    It's the V squared that gets you

  45. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finch Platte View Post
    Well, butter my butt and call me toast.
    Well, Mr. Butt Toast. You obviously missed [skimmed] post #137.

    Just to save you the scrolling up 8 posts, here it is.

    Quote Originally Posted by The_D00d View Post
    Not sure if this is something learned gradually or suddenly, but breaking your ribs sucks and will hurt for months.

    Also slowing down doesn't make you any safer.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  46. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasp4Air View Post
    No doubt there are some conditions where this is true, but generally speaking, falling down while going fast is going to hurt more than falling at a slower speed. How often do you hear that someone crashed due to excess slowness?
    You're less likely to get hurt or fall if you're safer.

    I've crashed plenty of times due to being too slow, though they can be saved by a quick-enough dismount (risk of bad injury if the dismount isn't clean). Some things need more inertia to clear. When I ride behind someone who rides slow, I often am put out of my comfort zone; the trail seems more challenging, and I often fail at the same things they do, which I'd normally clear if I weren't following. What am I to do, avoid features altogether that require a minimum amount of inertia to safely ride? Isn't overcoming fear and trauma part of progression? What's it called when you give in to the fear/trauma?

    I'd argue against the generalization that falling down while going fast is going to hurt more. It's decelerating at a higher rate that hurts more--if you smack into a non-moving object, going from 12 mph to not moving, in 0.5 seconds, that will hurt more than 20 mph to not moving in 2.5 seconds (force being transferred into a flip/roll/spin/slide). Extending that deceleration time is crucial. It's like free-falling onto concrete, vs grass, vs sand, vs water. Or a parkour runner doing a roll as part of his landing, vs not doing one. Seen people get hurt more seriously at the trailhead going walking speed (requiring legit medical attn), trying trials style stuff, than they did falling down a hill while going 20+ mph (brushed it all off, being more worried about the bike, and continued). The same person in some cases. It's the splat, more than the speed. This perception that falling at speed is very bad gets denied over and over, and we dismiss it all as the victim merely being lucky, rather than it being physics. "Holy shit, you're so lucky that wasn't any worse, considering you were hauling ass!"

    I firmly believe there's a natural sweet spot speed for the trail, a natural sweet spot speed for your equipment, and a natural sweet spot for your own ability. Get everything closer to the sweet spot and your riding experience improves, possibly getting you into "the zone". If you are going too fast, then yes, slowing down to be closer to the sweet spot is safer. There's not only a too fast, but also a too slow.

    Far better to focus on the level of safety/prevention, more than the consequences of the amount it'd hurt when falling at certain speeds. Better yet, focus on being able to go out on a "second" ride.
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  47. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by scatterbrained View Post
    Or forgetting to put the front tire in the car?
    What about checking you carry a spare tube before going out? Discovered that forgot my spare tube when needed and had a 9Kilometer walk pushing the bike.

  48. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by ninjichor View Post
    It's the splat, more than the speed.
    Agree that momentum can be your friend at times - like having enough of it to allow shocks to compress and handle obstacles, And this may prevent a slow-speed fall or endo or hurried dismount. So let's qualify the speed/hurt ratio definition.

    When falling, all other conditions being equal, more speed means bigger splat.


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  49. #149
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    Things MTBers gradually learn the hard way.

    Always have some toilet paper with you.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  50. #150
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasp4Air View Post
    Agree that momentum can be your friend at times - like having enough of it to allow shocks to compress and handle obstacles, And this may prevent a slow-speed fall or endo or hurried dismount. So let's qualify the speed/hurt ratio definition.

    When falling, all other conditions being equal, more speed means bigger splat.


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    But I don't think things are equal at speed, unless you hit an obstacle. I mean sure hitting a tree at 5mph is better than 10mph, but most of my injuries have come at slower speed. I think it is because at slower speed, I tend to try and eject and have time to tense up so what happens is I OTB all rigid and end up hitting the ground flat as if I jumped off my bike and belly flopped. Whereas when I crash at speed, it happens so fast, I am still relaxed and my speed helps me to roll and summersault. The rolling and summersaulting extend the deceleration time enough that I usually get up out of those wrecks without a scratch, whereas the slow OTB I have jammed wrists and the wind knocked out of me at a minimum.

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  51. #151
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    Worst injury I had was a high speed pedal strike splat into the ground with a grade 2 ACL separation. Happened so fast, I didnít have time to react let alone involuntarily groan.

    But, those slo speed mofers really hurt. Iím 200 pounds full kit, and land like a pile of cordwood at 1-2 mph.


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  52. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrallen View Post
    No matter what your skill level is, looking down the trail will make you instantly better.
    Truth. And it's amazing how often this is forgotten about and the eyes start focusing right in front of you again.

    Also second the lack of good skills practice. Just a simple and relatively short track stand can be the difference in falling/crashing or making the section.

  53. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by goodmojo View Post
    get a direct drive trainer and you dont need the rear wheel. I bought a fork mount and mounted it to some wood so I dont need the front wheel either. Also dont need brakes.

    App controlled trainers are mindblowingly useful. You can get used wahoo kickrs for about 600 in my area. Excellent investment and makes my limited riding time so much more enjoyable.
    Actually that is a great idea... I can start building up a hardtail but I only need the frame, drivetrain, cockpit (which I have most of) and seatpost/saddle. I could run a rigid fork.

    Especially since I can't find a smart trainer that fits a 12x150mm rear hub.
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  54. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by ravewoofer View Post
    Worst injury I had was a high speed pedal strike splat into the ground with a grade 2 ACL separation. Happened so fast, I didnít have time to react let alone involuntarily groan.

    But, those slo speed mofers really hurt. Iím 200 pounds full kit, and land like a pile of cordwood at 1-2 mph.


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    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  55. #155
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    No doubt, I wasn't trying to suggest that you won't fall down going fast. You will and it's certainly gonna hurt.

    There are lots of instances where things are about to get hairy so your (read: my) instinct will be to slow when it actually should be to speed up. In my first year almost all of the times I wrecked were because I was going to slow when I need to speed up.

  56. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_D00d View Post
    No doubt, I wasn't trying to suggest that you won't fall down going fast. You will and it's certainly gonna hurt.

    There are lots of instances where things are about to get hairy so your (read: my) instinct will be to slow when it actually should be to speed up. In my first year almost all of the times I wrecked were because I was going to slow when I need to speed up.
    Are we still discussing speed kills and tipping over at a crawl hurts like hell?
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  57. #157
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    A proper skills course will be the best money you can spend on your bike.
    We don't ride to add days to our life, we ride to add life to the days we have left here.

  58. #158
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    If I like it, donít weigh it.

    If I enjoyed it 4 years ago when I bought it, I am not going to enjoy it less now that something better came out.

    The most expensive way to get a really nice bike is to buy an OK bike and upgrade.

    No matter how good the deal is, stocking up on extra parts is a losing financial strategy.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  59. #159
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    Donít eat too much (e.g., a half pound roast beef sandwich) in one sitting during a ride, unless you want to take a nap and be worthless afterwards.
    Learning how to eat on a ride takes practice. The right amount of the right food at the right time(s) can greatly extend a ride. This will make it much more enjoyable.

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    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  60. #160
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    Mounting Maxxis tires with Double Down casings can break even the hardest of men


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  61. #161
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    The more you ride and practice the better you will be at riding and the less you will crash.

    The better you are at riding the less you will crash but the crashes will be much worse.

  62. #162
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    Quote Originally Posted by ninjichor View Post
    A lot of Strava data is questionable. "Race" the owner of the KOM, not their stats. They'll often will come up with some context regarding how they got that one time, which often severely devalues it.

    I haven't averaged over 25 mph on any pedally segment over 2 minutes ever since I ditched my 2x10. My 1x drivetrain holds me back greatly. It probably works on heavy 29ers, but I'm on a 27.5 with 175mm cranks, spinning out at 25 mph. I struggle to pedal over 85 rpm out-of-the-saddle for longer than 5-10 seconds, and that's only if it's smooth.
    Well, according to the top DH in the sport at speeds above 22mph you are better off to tuck then to pedal.

    They also train their ability to pedal at high cadences. It is fairly well known that peak power outputs happen in a cadence range of 100-140rpm.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

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