Swerving side d to side whilst in a wheelie, is it a difficult move ?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Swerving side d to side whilst in a wheelie, is it a difficult move ?

    I have a mountain bike, and i see young guys swerving around traffic cones and people whilst wheelying , side to side without dropping their wheel.

    They tend to be doing this on thicker wheeled SE Bikes, but is it possible to swerve like that on a 1.5 inch tyre mountain bike that i use on the street. ?

  2. #2
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    it's possible. it just takes practice.

  3. #3
    Up In Smoke
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    ...and do you plan on juggling bowling pins or chainsaws?

  4. #4
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    DJ will wheelie his bike to your mom's house...
    The only important thing these days, is rhythm and melody. Rhythm...and melody.

  5. #5
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    Takes a lot of abdomen/mid-strength IME. I've done a bit and I can do it sometimes...but when you start getting that precise, it takes massive control of those muscles IME.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  6. #6
    I have Flat Pedal shame.
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    Turn your handlebars the way you want to go and kinda point your knees and lean that way while you pedal.
    Life is easy. Figure out the price of whatever it is you want to do, then pay that price.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by rundown thomas View Post
    I have a mountain bike, and i see young guys swerving around traffic cones and people whilst wheelying , side to side without dropping their wheel.

    They tend to be doing this on thicker wheeled SE Bikes, but is it possible to swerve like that on a 1.5 inch tyre mountain bike that i use on the street. ?
    Is there a video of this? Also can you do a long wheelie without the swerving? That would seem to be something that we should know, vs. the tire size. Is your wheelie game strong?
    I like your bike

  8. #8
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    for reference, look up videos of "ride out" rides. it sounds like a ton of fun in a city where you don't have trails. it involves some harmless mischief that is annoying to old bougie folks.

    https://www.outsideonline.com/241436...al-media-posts

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thustlewhumber View Post
    Turn your handlebars the way you want to go and kinda point your knees and lean that way while you pedal.
    Yep, back in the day I could do it a little bit on a bike but on a motorcycle I could spell out your mothers name in cursive while up on a wheelie.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  10. #10
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    I swerve quite consistently.

    Because I end up out of control and the bike swerves to where it wants to go, obstacle or no obstacle.

    Actually, I get a lot more roll on the 2.8" tire than the 2.3 tire so it takes a few tries to adapt before I can ride a semi-straight line.
    Can I avoid an obstacle on purpose in a wheelie, not a chance.

  11. #11
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    I had a breakthrough a little more than a month ago wheelie-ing, I was able to make a 90 degree turn at slow speed ON PURPOSE. I still have to get a lot better at it though. I'm much better at making left turns than right though. I could already steer somewhat, but I'm still getting better at it. I can generally follow curving bike paths these days.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  12. #12
    Professional Crastinator
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    yup.



    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    I had a breakthrough a little more than a month ago wheelie-ing, I was able to make a 90 degree turn at slow speed ON PURPOSE. I still have to get a lot better at it though. I'm much better at making left turns than right though. I could already steer somewhat, but I'm still getting better at it. I can generally follow curving bike paths these days.
    how long have you been dedicated to proper practice of wheelies

  14. #14
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    I had a breakthrough today...
    Over the past 2 days I have been out on the bike and couldnt wheelie more than 5 pedals..and previous to this i was wheelieing about 100 metres and more quite frequently.

    Over past few days i have been going over to the side, time and time again.
    I pumped my rear tyre up quite hard and BOOM, immediately did a 100 m wheelie.

    Lesson learned... having quite hard tyre pressure is ESSENTIAL, otherwise as you pull up, or pedal there is BOUNCE, which forces you to one side, and when you correct there is even more bounce..so the wheelie fails.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fleas View Post
    yup.



    -F
    Is it wrong to say this almost makes me miss having a fixed gear bike?
    dang

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by rundown thomas View Post
    how long have you been dedicated to proper practice of wheelies
    About 3 mo
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by rundown thomas View Post
    I had a breakthrough today...
    Over the past 2 days I have been out on the bike and couldnt wheelie more than 5 pedals..and previous to this i was wheelieing about 100 metres and more quite frequently.

    Over past few days i have been going over to the side, time and time again.
    I pumped my rear tyre up quite hard and BOOM, immediately did a 100 m wheelie.

    Lesson learned... having quite hard tyre pressure is ESSENTIAL, otherwise as you pull up, or pedal there is BOUNCE, which forces you to one side, and when you correct there is even more bounce..so the wheelie fails.
    You will learn to wheel with the proper pressure too. The harder tire will help you lean as it is easier.

    I wheelie a 27.5x2.8" tire with 13 psi in it just the same as 22 psi in my 29x2.35. The two bikes have crazy different chain stay lengths and I can get off one bike and onto the next and wheelie it just the same. As long as I've practiced on both. I ride my full suspension stumpjumper more than the Chameleon. I had a worn out brake on Chameleon for 2 months.....once I got the new brakes on I attempted to wheelie it and it took a few tries to not want to go over backwards (it wheelies in the blink of an eye).

    Anyway, the point is that once you lean, you'll only improve. You may find that more speed helps, and a harder gear. But that takes times to be confident to lift the wheel at those speeds since things happen (bad) very quickly.

    Good luck. Keep practicing but don't get too over confident too fast (it probably hurts to go over backwards).

  18. #18
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    cool...
    i have kept a diary and i stopped and started but so far i have done 51 sessions...about 15 in august sept last year ...then picked back up in april...totalling 51 sessions.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forest Rider View Post
    You will learn to wheel with the proper pressure too. The harder tire will help you lean as it is easier.

    I wheelie a 27.5x2.8" tire with 13 psi in it just the same as 22 psi in my 29x2.35. The two bikes have crazy different chain stay lengths and I can get off one bike and onto the next and wheelie it just the same. As long as I've practiced on both. I ride my full suspension stumpjumper more than the Chameleon. I had a worn out brake on Chameleon for 2 months.....once I got the new brakes on I attempted to wheelie it and it took a few tries to not want to go over backwards (it wheelies in the blink of an eye).

    Anyway, the point is that once you lean, you'll only improve. You may find that more speed helps, and a harder gear. But that takes times to be confident to lift the wheel at those speeds since things happen (bad) very quickly.

    Good luck. Keep practicing but don't get too over confident too fast (it probably hurts to go over backwards).
    not sure what gear i am in ..I have 7 on the back from small to large i am on gear 5.
    This harder tyre is making an impact though, i am hoping to be able to wheelie forever soon...that is the plan.. and from there i am gonna learn swerving, one hand, and touching the floor.

    I dont think my bike has a decent geomertry for one hand though...I think maybe for one second but not a constant one hand wheelie.

  20. #20
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    I think I had a record a few weeks ago. On pavement and it is always easier if the surface is slightly uphill. I'm to a point where I can sort of not pedal for a second to fix the balance, but it's not perfect.

    I can't wheelie forever, probably never will be able to.
    And I'm not brave enough to use 1/2 of my hands.

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