Staying in great shape while aging- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Staying in great shape while aging

    I'm nearing 40 and have a couple young kids and haven't been riding as much as I'd like. I'm curious to hear from others who are probably past their prime. What works for you to stay in great shape?

  2. #2
    always licking the glass
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    As someone who just turned 45, Iím working on getting into better shape.

    Three keys: food, recovery, and prevention of overuse injuries (easy to occur in mtb).

    Iíve had to really watch my diet (a constant work in progress), and Iím finding I have to be weight training and stretching regularly. Cross training and diet are the key for me.

    That said, Iím riding harder stuff than I did a few years ago, and I find that injuries take a lot longer to recover from.

    Also, sleep is super important. Itís where recovery happens, and recovery seems to take a lot longer than it used to. Again food is key.
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  3. #3
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    First I'm not in great shape but decent shape. I run and lift daily and ride at least five days a week weather permitting. It would really help if I watched what I eat but in due time.

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  4. #4
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    I agree with all of stripes points. I would also add that additional (non-bike) exercises are important, especially ones that target and strengthen joints. Lots of studies cite the importance of using resistance and weights as we age to maintain muscle strength and mass.

    Other than that just hit it, once you establish a good base don't be afraid to push yourself. I'm 56 and am as fast or faster than ever, still race and still snag pr's and an occasional kom. Not afraid of riding with 20 y/o's.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  5. #5
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    Lots of good advice so far. Iíd add to incorporate some kind of hinging exercise into your routine. Either kettlebell swings or deadlifts.

  6. #6
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    I'm turning 40 this year myself. I am on a fitness plan that focuses on my strength, flexibility, and mobility. I also cycle 2-3 times a week mixing it between my trainer and my mountain bikes.

    Don't tell me I'm past my prime. I haven't learned that lesson yet
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  7. #7
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    I'll be 49 this year, but don't feel it. I'm as fast as ever. Eat your fruits and vegetables. No junk food or sugar. Drink tons of water. Get in the gym and do arms, shoulders and squats. I also do yoga for my core. At this age, if you don't stretch, your joints tighten up. Get plenty of rest.

    I don't know if this makes a difference, but I start the day with a 16oz water with one lemon squeezed into it and gobble hot peppers like serranos and ghosts like candy and don't remember the last time I had so much as a sniffle.
    Ripping trails and tipping ales

  8. #8
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    will be 50 this year. Just had a heart attack 2 years ago. I grew up playing hockey, but had a pretty bad leg injury 4 years ago during a game that has kept me off the ice.

    Since the heart attack, it has been a "reworking" of my eating habits for sure. Riding my bikes - BMX and MTB - has not only been great physical therapy, but also mental therapy.

    I really got into yoga about 7 years ago, and love to do that to keep my self strong and limber. Also do a regular routine at the gym - focused on rehabbing my leg, but also just general upkeep. I really want to start skating again as well...it is weird to not be on the ice after 40 years of doing that

    My biggest fear as I grow older is immobility. I don't want to be stranded one day to a walker or wheelchair. Having the heart attack realy opened my eyes to how much eating has to do with that possible outcome
    Go practice. Figure it out. - Fleas

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  9. #9
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    Just turned 51 in January and after stepping on the scale for the first time in awhile (and cringing), I decided it was time to get serious about fitness and overall health.

    Started keeping a food diary (MyFitnessPal app) and thatís done wonders for cleaning up my eating and drinking habits.

    The wife and I bought ourselves a cycling trainer and have been very diligent in mixing up cycling sessions with strength training and treadmill workouts. Our weather has sucked this winter so not much trail or road time.

    Body weight, kettlebell and weight machine workouts along with the trainer have already made a noticeable difference with weight loss and muscle tone.

    Hopefully it will all pay off when our cycling ďseasonĒ starts!


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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by HawkGX View Post
    Just turned 51 in January and after stepping on the scale for the first time in awhile (and cringing), I decided it was time to get serious about fitness and overall health.

    Started keeping a food diary (MyFitnessPal app) and thatís done wonders for cleaning up my eating and drinking habits.

    The wife and I bought ourselves a cycling trainer and have been very diligent in mixing up cycling sessions with strength training and treadmill workouts. Our weather has sucked this winter so not much trail or road time.

    Body weight, kettlebell and weight machine workouts along with the trainer have already made a noticeable difference with weight loss and muscle tone.

    Hopefully it will all pay off when our cycling ďseasonĒ starts!


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    that My Fitness app helped me SO MUCH as I was relearning about how to eat
    Go practice. Figure it out. - Fleas

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  11. #11
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    Aside from a lot of time doing my active, fun hobbies - mostly biking and xc skiing these days...

    Strength training with weights. Dead lift, squat, chins, rows, bench. Relatively heavy. Stimulates testosterone and that's what's needed to keep us strong and in shape. Mix in running here and there.

    If I workout hard with those things I find lesser lifts and stretching superfluous. Unless I'm rehabbing an injury.

    Don't smoke or drink too much alcohol, eat right/eat less, sleep a lot.

  12. #12
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    Bunch of kids responding---I am 65 and ride 2X a week for about 3 hours a ride----yes I am a bit slower and a bit more cautious but still riding better than many younger folks I meet.
    On days I am not riding I am in the gym----one day I do about 40 minutes on the bike at 145--150 heart rate and the other day 4X5 minute intervales at 162 heart rate--that seems effective---cardio is #1 and many short cut this. I also do normal upper body work ---bench---pull downs---biceps----tricepts-and of course those awful planks-----I do no kill myself just trying to be toned---I suspect this is good for me but may have little affect on the bike.

    My diet is the same mess as always along with my drinking but I do not have the will to change that.

    My take is to ride and keep up the cardio in the gym----as we age we lose cardio capacity and that is what it is but we can try to slow the degradation.

    This seems to slow the inevitable

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by pctloper View Post
    Bunch of kids responding-

    lol, no matter how old you get there's always someone older calling you a "kid". No worries, Velorider will probably pop in here soon... sonny
    I brake for stinkbugs

  14. #14
    always licking the glass
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    Quote Originally Posted by pctloper View Post
    Bunch of kids responding---I am 65 and ride 2X a week for about 3 hours a ride----yes I am a bit slower and a bit more cautious but still riding better than many younger folks I meet.
    On days I am not riding I am in the gym----one day I do about 40 minutes on the bike at 145--150 heart rate and the other day 4X5 minute intervales at 162 heart rate--that seems effective---cardio is #1 and many short cut this. I also do normal upper body work ---bench---pull downs---biceps----tricepts-and of course those awful planks-----I do no kill myself just trying to be toned---I suspect this is good for me but may have little affect on the bike.

    My diet is the same mess as always along with my drinking but I do not have the will to change that.

    My take is to ride and keep up the cardio in the gym----as we age we lose cardio capacity and that is what it is but we can try to slow the degradation.

    This seems to slow the inevitable
    Hey I like being called a kid

    I find that I have to vary my cardio: cardio kickboxing, walking, taiko drumming, HIIT.. anything but spinning year round. It gives my overworked cycling muscles a chance for downtime and helps me with preventing burnout.

    I tried snow biking and I havenít really enjoyed it but it works in a pinch. But really I find that crosstraining is really key to give me a chance for less injury and better recovery.
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  15. #15
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    65 here. If you're lucky enough to fall in love with some sport -- any sport -- that keeps you active & moving and then you get luckier yet to find that your passion for your sport doesn't wane thoughout the ensuing years, then you've got a good chance of staying fit and hanging on to your energy & mobility for a long time.

    I got lucky. I fell in love with mountain biking a few decades ago. Never stop moving. See my sig.
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    We get old because we quit riding.

  16. #16
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    At only 53, I take exception to being described as "past my prime."

    I just eat well and ride my bike a lot. I hate running and avoid gyms and weight lifting at all costs.

  17. #17
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    Trail running. I got into running but I had to really force myself. But I found trail running to be a lot more enjoyable, I don't really like road running. I used to drive my daughter to school and then stop on my way to work and trail run. I'm fortunate in that we have showers at work. Now I'm fortunate that I drive by an NPS park and can stop and run on my way into work and that I have somewhat flexible hours. Prior to all this, I wasn't a morning person much less a morning exercise person; had to develop a new routine.

    I'm finishing my basement and we're planning on adding a bit of a home gym as I need to work on flexibility and upper body.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgltrak View Post
    At only 53, I take exception to being described as "past my prime."

    I just eat well and ride my bike a lot. I hate running and avoid gyms and weight lifting at all costs.
    I'm only 36, but i don't build muscle like i used to. I need to do a nominal amount of weight training to maintain my upper body strength. When i'm riding a lot of mtb it's not necessary, but during the winter or just when i'm not mtb-crazy it helps keep my form.

    I worry about my personal standards dropping. I know it's gonna happen, but i want it to match my aging.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
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  19. #19
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    I'm 47 with 3 kids and am in the best shape since I was 26 and my skill level is an all time high.

    There is no reason to believe you are over the hill yet!

    My advice get out there and ride. That's a little hard with young kids. So... Get some lights and go at stupid times that least affects the kids.


    I also agree with better nutrition. It's all about getting the right food in and maintaining your weight at a good level.

  20. #20
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    I'm 45 & in the best shape of my life. I saw that riding only was not enough. I lift weights & do elliptical machine four times a week at 1 & 1/2 hours each session. It takes about three months to start seeing results. I'm at 6 months now. When your knees & core get stronger, the old man pains start to go away. I feel so much better. Getting out of bed doesn't hurt anymore. I also fall asleep better. I also take supplements like whey protein powder, amino acid powder, & glucosamine & chondroitin.

    Dead lifts are magic for strengthening knees & core even if the target muscles are supposed to be glutes, quads, & hams. I have a bulging disk in my lower back & that doesn't bother me much anymore.

    With the muscle weight gain, I haven't made any speed gains on the bike (5'11" / 202 lbs), but my endurance is way better from the extra cardio on the elliptical & the gut is almost gone.

    I still smoke like 5 cigs a day & refuse to cut out alcohol (2-5 Scotches per weekend).

    Us old goats have to work out to keep up the testosterone levels, muscle mass, bone mass, & range of motion. It's use it or lose it.

  21. #21
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    Turning 40 was a breeze for me, I felt faster at and over 40 then probably ever before. In my late 40's(46-49), I did have a lifestyle change which kept me off the bike regularly and I did get out of shape.
    When I turned 50, I was able to get my life back on track and started training hard again.
    I think my early 50's was my fastest and fittest ever. I won several cat 1 races, a lot of times catching the younger groups and even catching the pros.
    When I turned 54, something happened, not quite sure what it was but it seemed to have slowed me down a bit. I still have some unbelievable rides sometimes, but not like a few years earlier. Im 57 now.
    I know this post isnt about me, I just hope to inspire and let you know that you can be all you want to be.
    EXODUX Jeff

  22. #22
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    Turning 57 this summer, and knock wood, am in the best shape of my life. That includes my teens and early 20ís when I was a very competitive athlete.

    These days, I stay in shape off season with Spin class with YOUNG instructors. They are amazingly fit and I keep up with them or better.

    I do some light lifting, too. On season, Iím on the bike pounding it. Iíll add one Spin class weekly, too.

    I eat healthy, but donít count calories or carbs.

    Stopped drinking 2.5 years ago, too. I feel fresh on the start of every ride. No hangovers to work through.

    Thatís it, and maybe lucky genes, too.


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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveRider View Post

    I still smoke like 5 cigs a day & refuse to cut out alcohol


    Ditch those cigs and you'll feel 10 years younger almost immediately (ask me how I know) they are extremely poisonous and are counteracting a lot of the good things you're doing.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  24. #24
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    we have been having a discussion like things on VitalBMX as well, and it is funny how many people think that off bike training has no effect on riding. I have found the opposite. Since starting a more consistent and regimented off bike work out program 2 years ago, my on bike skills have improved immensely. Especially some of my tech skills like manuals, hops and jumps. My balance is way better because of stronger muscles, and my endurance is definitely better.

    i don't get where the mind set comes from. I do know that a lot of the guys over there that have the mindset are ones who have never really been in a gym, or worked out - which is fine...that was me for the first 47 years of my life. But man, I wish I would have gotten nover my self and got into more directed workouts a long time ago
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  25. #25
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    I got in really bad shape from late 20s to mid 40s (I blame getting married and having kids), I had been a pretty respectable cat1 racer in my early 20s. At your age I was up to about 230 pounds, no regular exercise and quite a few bad eating habits. When I was about 43 I started turning it around and riding 3 to 4x per week, then a friend of ours dropped dead from a heart attack at 40 and I determined to 'live' a little bit more, and got more serious about getting race fit again. I just turned 52, I've been about 180 pounds for the past 5 years, and just won another cat1 age group mtb series, with 4 wins and one 2nd out of 5 races so far this year. Like JB Weld said, I don't fear riding with younger riders, in fact it's great fun to make them suffer, - although it is getting hard to make my 15 year old son hurt on the bike anymore!, he's getting quite fast.
    Like the legendary coach Friel has written, you have 3 basic elements to training; frequency, intensity, and duration, try not to skip any of the three, - but if you're just starting a workout program take it really easy on the intensity. Keep frequency in mind, and it's ok to be a bit obsessive about it, even 20 minutes on the trainer counts. My personal rule has been; no more than 2 days off the bike in a row, and no more than 3 days on in a row (occasional exceptions are allowed), and it has worked very well for me.
    At almost 40 you are not old at all (although you may be starting to feel not as young as you did), and you can still get very very fit, it does not get easier as you get older, so you might as well begin now. Get a trailer for the kids, and see if you can involve them in some of your rides; get a workout, give your wife a break, and the kids get a nap.
    skidding is the signature of the novice; learn how to use your brakes.

  26. #26
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    A lot of good points have already been covered and I would agree with them...trying to add something new:

    One lesson I have learned and really embraced both with biking and other forms of exercise (and life in general)...don't fall into ruts.

    For riding I undoubtedly have a home trail system, I try like hell to not do the same exact ride twice even if I'm covering some of the same trails. I make it a point to hit two new local places every year and also take at least one multi day trip somewhere completely new. If my last ride was shorter and hard, the next ride should be longer and less technical. If a trail really seems to flow in one direction I make a point to ride it in the opposite direction every once in a while.

    Keeping things fresh and new helps me both physically and mentally. (I'm about to turn 39, for frame of reference).

  27. #27
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    Don't neglect your core! You back will thank you later. (I'm 56 and I've been playing core catch-up after a herniated disc a few years back) Planks, crunches/sit-ups, etc. Boring but beneficial.

  28. #28
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    Set a very challenging mtnb goal for your 40th b-day. Tell everyone about your goal so you can't back out. 6 months out from my 50th I decided to do a 50 mile ride at altitude. I met with a trainer specializing in endurance races and was set up on a weekly training and eating plan. The training plan incorporated weight training, rides, and proper nutrition. As mentioned, the fitness pal app is really useful and eye-opening. Instead of spending my 50th b-day dwelling on the fact I was getting older, I was up in the mountains busting my ass. There is no way i could have survived this ride 10 or even 20 years ago.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    we have been having a discussion like things on VitalBMX as well, and it is funny how many people think that off bike training has no effect on riding. I have found the opposite. Since starting a more consistent and regimented off bike work out program 2 years ago, my on bike skills have improved immensely. Especially some of my tech skills like manuals, hops and jumps. My balance is way better because of stronger muscles, and my endurance is definitely better.

    i don't get where the mind set comes from. I do know that a lot of the guys over there that have the mindset are ones who have never really been in a gym, or worked out - which is fine...that was me for the first 47 years of my life. But man, I wish I would have gotten nover my self and got into more directed workouts a long time ago
    Your post really resonates with me. I'd say the fastest I've ever been on the bike in terms of fitness/endurance (XC, road, and cyclocross racing) was in my early-mid 30s.

    I started off as an expert level BMX racer as a kid before transitioning to MTB and other disciplines. I always read articles about the benefits of strength training, but never could motivate myself to do it, because I couldn't see the benefit and I hate working out indoors. In terms of bike handling/skills I never felt anything lacking in my riding that tons of miles on the bike couldn't cure.

    Fast forward to my late 30s early 40s and I lost interest in racing, but was still riding a fair amount and transitioning more towards gravity riding. All of a sudden, I started noticing inconsistency in my riding (having a lot of "off" days), and noticed lack of core and upper body strength holding me back.

    Currently, while I'm not nearly as fast on the climbs (I'm a fair bit heavier than my prime racing days), I feel as good if not better on the technical sections and downhill than I ever have, continuing to ride bigger and bigger features and more challenging trails.

    I attribute that to 2 things. 1) taking a 3 day DH skills camp with a good instructor, and 2) spending a bunch of time in the gym (~ 5 days/week for the last 6 months)

    Those are two things I never would have considered doing 10 or 15 years ago, because I just didn't see the need.

    The skills camp reinforced all the good technique and riding habits I developed over 35+ years of riding/racing, but also corrected a couple if flaws in my riding that had been holding me back.

    The work in the gym has given me the core and upper body strength to really maintain good position on the bike (particularly hinging at the hips) and the ability to really throw the bike around.
    No dig no whine

  30. #30
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    Yeah. 40 was freakin' nothin'. 60 I was flyin'. 65 is significantly more challenging. Shit can start hitting the fan, earlier for some, much later for others. It doesn't matter if you're fast or slow. Just keep pushin' no matter what. Whatever it takes.
    Do the math.

  31. #31
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    I turned 40 in horrible shape. Smoking half a pack, drinking a sixer a night, burritos every day... 189 lbs of blubber and I wasn't happy about it. Moved to Alaska and discovered XC skiing, which led to just wanting to get into better shape. Completed P90X, stumbled into Crossfit for a few years, which led a serious infatuation with powerlifting.

    I turned 50 strong as an ox but at the expense of conditioning and flexiblity, and with a hip that will need to be replaced once I'm done with snowboarding and lifting. These days I aim for a 3/2/1 approach: 3 days of strength training, 2 days of mt biking, 1 day of yoga. I add in occasional challenges like how many kettlebell swings I can get in a month, how many miles on the airdyne, how many unbroken jump rope skips.... Perhaps not as strong over all these days, but stronger than most and in much better shape overall.

    Bottom line keep things varied, don't chase one aspect of "fitness" at the expense of the others, and make sure you enjoy what you are doing. If you don't enjoy it, you won't stick with it.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Horseshoe View Post
    I turned 40 in horrible shape. Smoking half a pack, drinking a sixer a night, burritos every day... 189 lbs of blubber and I wasn't happy about it. Moved to Alaska and discovered XC skiing, which led to just wanting to get into better shape. Completed P90X, stumbled into Crossfit for a few years, which led a serious infatuation with powerlifting.

    I turned 50 strong as an ox but at the expense of conditioning and flexiblity, and with a hip that will need to be replaced once I'm done with snowboarding and lifting. These days I aim for a 3/2/1 approach: 3 days of strength training, 2 days of mt biking, 1 day of yoga. I add in occasional challenges like how many kettlebell swings I can get in a month, how many miles on the airdyne, how many unbroken jump rope skips.... Perhaps not as strong over all these days, but stronger than most and in much better shape overall.

    Bottom line keep things varied, don't chase one aspect of "fitness" at the expense of the others, and make sure you enjoy what you are doing. If you don't enjoy it, you won't stick with it.
    I run with a schedule sort of like yours...or at least inspired by the variety...I do gym on day A, yoga on day B in a rotation. During the school year, I can only ride on weekends, or days off, but in the summer, I rotate between MTB on A, and BMX on Day B. Many times in the summer I do BMX in the morning and MTB in the evening (the skateparks are usually empty in the morning) on the same day.

    I love the variety, and it allows muscle groups to relax on the off days...I think I am almost ready to add skating back to the activity rotation...hockey would be on Sunday nights, and open skates (with the wife who is an ex-pro figure skater...so she kicks my ass all around the rink) on Saturday afternoons
    Go practice. Figure it out. - Fleas

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  33. #33
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    eat healthy (most days), lift weights regularly, keep body weight down, dont be a dumbass

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by bank5 View Post
    I'm nearing 40 and have a couple young kids and haven't been riding as much as I'd like. I'm curious to hear from others who are probably past their prime. What works for you to stay in great shape?
    Lol!!

    I haven't been this fit in probably 16-17 years.

    19-20 y/o was probably the fittest I've ever been.

    To keep in shape (wouldn't say it's great), I try and ride whenever I can.

    I do weights... no specific cycle. Just try and get once or twice a week in.

    But, if I'm not feeling it... I'll just ride for a couple of weeks w/o hitting the gym.

    I don't stretch as much as I use to.

    Did almost 5 1/2 years of Kung Fu - prior to new job (10 or so months ago)... So, I'll mix in a bit of martial arts practice - try for once a week. Again, if I'm not feeling it...

    If work/weather/family life are preventing riding I'll do other. If I can ride, I'll ride.

    Eat/drink in moderation.

    Spend time with loved ones. Feeling young is more important than looking young imo.

    Manage stress i.e. get out & ride. Enjoy life, both the good & not so good (learn from it).

    Keep using it ^^ Once you stop, it'll be hard to get back.

    'Born to ride!'
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  35. #35
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    Great stuff! It's motivating hearing from some of the older members. I played football from age 12 through college so consider 40's plus past my prime in terms of lifting and sprinting, but obviously it isn't for a lot of the mountain bikers on here. I guess that's one nice thing about the biking -- it's easier to do as you age than many other sports

    Big take-aways from the responses are:

    1. It's never too late or old to get in great shape
    2. I should cross train more. Hitting the gym more consistently
    3. I should do my core / stretching / yoga.
    4. Keep an all around healthy lifestyle - eating, reducing alcohol & stress
    5. I like setting goals to stay motivated. like the recommendation to set a big ride for when I turn 40
    6. It'll take work, but the work will pay off

  36. #36
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    Basically eat well and keep moving. Putting it another way: You can't out exercise a bad diet
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  37. #37
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    Eat well, don't let the extra kilos pile on, don't drink too much, stretch lots, ride your bike to work. I set the goal of going into my 40s in better shape than I was when I turned 30, and as I approach my 38th birthday I'm fitter and faster than I've ever been. Oh, and make good quality sleep a priority too!

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    I clicked the thread fearing I was going to have to advocate for lifting weights, but I am happy to see how much emphasis there has been on it. Beyond feeling good on the mountain bike, it makes everything in life easier. Basic movements like getting out of bed, walking up stairs, carrying something...all get so much easier. Its a fact that you lose bone density as you age, lifting weights is really the only way to combat this. I argue this is necessary for anyone who is aging (hint, we all are) let alone looking to improve your mountain biking.

    There was a study performed a while back that shows the direct correlation of likelihood of death within 10 years to your ability to get off the floor. Meaning, the less support you need (using all limbs, external aid, etc.) the less likely you are going to die within the next 10 years. Its a very interesting read: https://geriatrictoolkit.missouri.ed...lity-2012..pdf

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  39. #39
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    Prime is 18-60 if you take care of yourself. There are riders in their 70s around here that are no slouches.

  40. #40
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    Though you're only 40, check out the Fifty-Plus forum for suggestions.

    You probably have to figure out how to carve out the time in your schedule with 2 young kids. Many of us have been there including myself. My wife and I worked together to allow one another time to pursue our fitness interests.

    Like many have stated, diet is crucial as you get older.
    The only important thing these days, is rhythm and melody. Rhythm...and melody.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    You can't out exercise a bad diet
    I'm finally accepting this tragic truth. I'm not gonna lie, one of the key reasons I took up a sport nearly 50 years ago (running at that time) was so I could enjoy whatever I wanted to eat. To paraphrase/bastardize Bob Dylan's lyrics, I used to not care but things have changed.
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  42. #42
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    In 2008 Usain Bolt said he ate nothing but chicken McNuggets for a week before breaking 3 world records in Bejing. You can get away with a lot when you're young.
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  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vader View Post
    I'll be 49 this year, but don't feel it. I'm as fast as ever. Eat your fruits and vegetables. No junk food or sugar. Drink tons of water. Get in the gym and do arms, shoulders and squats. I also do yoga for my core. At this age, if you don't stretch, your joints tighten up. Get plenty of rest.

    I don't know if this makes a difference, but I start the day with a 16oz water with one lemon squeezed into it and gobble hot peppers like serranos and ghosts like candy and don't remember the last time I had so much as a sniffle.
    ^^ good advice. Inflammation becomes a real issue as we age and experience a natural deterioration of cells. Sugar and processed food = inflammation = slow recovery / injury. Diet and activities that combat inflammation is real important.Cutting back on alcohol, sugars, breads, pastas etc.

    Living in Asia, one of the biggest differences I see to North American culture is how people age in respect to their health. Unless you're in FL or AZ, you rarely see old people out in public, unless you're at Perkins or McDonalds for breakfast, and I'd reckon a majority are overweight or obese. Whereas in much of Asia, older people are out en masse, walking and riding bikes, meeting friends for hikes or walks, taking subways and buses, going up and down stairs, filling parks with group exercise or using the public exercise machines. Its not uncommon to see a 75 year old hanging upside down on an inversion table in the morning, knocking out pull-ups or hiking 2km up a mountain side to play badminton with friends. Even Australia has loads of public exercise equipment parks. Keep the body moving!

    Staying in great shape while aging-screen-shot-2019-03-15-9.50.34-am.jpg
    Staying in great shape while aging-screen-shot-2019-03-15-9.50.50-am.jpg
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  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    In 2008 Usain Bolt said he ate nothing but chicken McNuggets for a week before breaking 3 world records in Bejing. You can get away with a lot when you're young.
    That does it, I'm adding McNuggets back into my diet. Thanks & Hallelujah!
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  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by motard5 View Post
    ^^ good advice. Inflammation becomes a real issue as we age and experience a natural deterioration of cells. Sugar and processed food = inflammation = slow recovery / injury. Diet and activities that combat inflammation is real important.Cutting back on alcohol, sugars, breads, pastas etc.

    Living in Asia, one of the biggest differences I see to North American culture is how people age in respect to their health. Unless you're in FL or AZ, you rarely see old people out in public, unless you're at Perkins or McDonalds for breakfast, and I'd reckon a majority are overweight or obese. Whereas in much of Asia, older people are out en masse, walking and riding bikes, meeting friends for hikes or walks, taking subways and buses, going up and down stairs, filling parks with group exercise or using the public exercise machines. Its not uncommon to see a 75 year old hanging upside down on an inversion table in the morning, knocking out pull-ups or hiking 2km up a mountain side to play badminton with friends. Even Australia has loads of public exercise equipment parks. Keep the body moving!

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    I feel like we breed a mindset of "old people need to be careful and stay inside" here in America. I notice that with my parents who are now in their 70's...about 15 years ago, they both started playing the "grandparent" role. Dad especially started "excusing" himself out of hiking and camping - activities that he was hardcore involved in his whole life - because every one was telling him he was "too old" to be doing that. He was told by many of his friends that he should now be just relaxing in the house because "he deserved it". Mom definitely fell into the role of the placid grandmother.

    I notice now that they are starting to tell me the same thing when I talk about my bike riding or hockey. 'You are getting to old for that!", or "aren't you worried you are going to get hurt?" i'm like, uh, yeah...but I gotta still live

    ....I think it is sort of generational too...they are tail end Greatest Generation, and are doing exactly what my grandparents did...
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  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaXCarp View Post
    I clicked the thread fearing I was going to have to advocate for lifting weights, but I am happy to see how much emphasis there has been on it. Beyond feeling good on the mountain bike, it makes everything in life easier. Basic movements like getting out of bed, walking up stairs, carrying something...all get so much easier. Its a fact that you lose bone density as you age, lifting weights is really the only way to combat this. I argue this is necessary for anyone who is aging (hint, we all are) let alone looking to improve your mountain biking.

    There was a study performed a while back that shows the direct correlation of likelihood of death within 10 years to your ability to get off the floor. Meaning, the less support you need (using all limbs, external aid, etc.) the less likely you are going to die within the next 10 years. Its a very interesting read: https://geriatrictoolkit.missouri.ed...lity-2012..pdf

    If you don't do Turkish Get-Ups, start doing them.
    I do a lot of reading on the topic, and yup, lifting and mobility aid in healthy aging. The other area is maintaining good aerobic capacity.
    The only important thing these days, is rhythm and melody. Rhythm...and melody.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    You can get away with a lot when you're young.
    Yeah...that doesn't apply to everyone. If I ate like that at any age I'd weigh 300 lbs.
    No dig no whine

  48. #48
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    Genetics play a factor, for sure. Having just turned 57 in January, I'm thankful to be lean with low cholesterol, low average BP, and a high lung capacity. Besides staying generally active, I eat most things in moderation but I stay away from wheat and wheat based products.

    I also discovered a mindset, that pushing beyond where you thought possible opens up possibilities that sedentary folks don't know exist. Lance Armstrong, for all his flaws, found that pushing beyond your comfort zone and into the realm of pain, gives you an edge over those unwilling to push that far. The human body is a remarkable machine and adjusts very well to physical exertion. I'm stronger and a more fit rider than when I was in my 30s.

    David Goggins (at least I think it was him) says that most people in our society only push themselves to a level of discomfort and don't challenge them selves enough (paraphrasing). They go to their perceived "max" and back off figuring, "that's it". That discomfort level is really only 30-40% of their actual ability. Push beyond that and the possibilities start to open up.
    "And crawling on the planet's face, some insects called, The Human Race..."

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    Genetics play a factor, for sure. Having just turned 57 in January, I'm thankful to be lean with low cholesterol, low average BP, and a high lung capacity. Besides staying generally active, I eat most things in moderation but I stay away from wheat and wheat based products.

    I also discovered a mindset, that pushing beyond where you thought possible opens up possibilities that sedentary folks don't know exist. Lance Armstrong, for all his flaws, found that pushing beyond your comfort zone and into the realm of pain, gives you an edge over those unwilling to push that far. The human body is a remarkable machine and adjusts very well to physical exertion. I'm stronger and a more fit rider than when I was in my 30s.

    David Goggins (at least I think it was him) says that most people in our society only push themselves to a level of discomfort and don't challenge them selves enough (paraphrasing). They go to their perceived "max" and back off figuring, "that's it". That discomfort level is really only 30-40% of their actual ability. Push beyond that and the possibilities start to open up.
    Armstrong and any of the elite pro's have that same mindset about embracing the miserable level of suffering that 99% of people will not engage in.

    I'm no top level amateur by any stretch but try to remind myself that whatever I'm doing, I can go deeper. It truly is a mindset but hard to achieve.
    The only important thing these days, is rhythm and melody. Rhythm...and melody.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crankout View Post
    Armstrong and any of the elite pro's have that same mindset about embracing the miserable level of suffering that 99% of people will not engage in.

    I'm no top level amateur by any stretch but try to remind myself that whatever I'm doing, I can go deeper. It truly is a mindset but hard to achieve.
    Exactly!
    "And crawling on the planet's face, some insects called, The Human Race..."

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by twd953 View Post
    I started off as an expert level BMX racer...
    I am 33 and have two young kids as well, and something that has helped me get into better shape is starting to BMX race with my kids. Of course this time is somewhat at the expense of MTB, but it is something that you can do together with the kids, and it's crazy fun. If you go MTB riding with the kids you have to go at their pace and skill level, but at the BMX track everyone can do their own thing.

    Also if you play your cards right, you can watch the kids at BMX while your spouse gets some personal time. Then you get personal time another day to do your MTB riding, hence doubling your exercise time. I've never really been in "great shape" ever, but I am close to the the best I've ever been in by racing and practicing a lot, and the BMX racing competitiveness encourages me to do more time in the gym and sprints and things I never would have done before.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by bank5 View Post
    I'm nearing 40 and have a couple young kids and haven't been riding as much as I'd like. I'm curious to hear from others who are probably past their prime. What works for you to stay in great shape?
    Commute a couple days a week. Theres no weaseling out of ride when your cars at work. I do have the benefit of living in tropics so im not as hard core as the winter snow commuters, i give those people massive props!

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by root View Post
    Commute a couple days a week. Theres no weaseling out of ride when your cars at work. I do have the benefit of living in tropics so im not as hard core as the winter snow commuters, i give those people massive props!
    I work from home now. I used to commute by bike but got taken out by a car once. After that I decided it wasn't worth it for me.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by bank5 View Post
    I work from home now. I used to commute by bike but got taken out by a car once. After that I decided it wasn't worth it for me.
    Are you married? Like I mentioned before, work it out with your spouse in order to make some time for riding.
    The only important thing these days, is rhythm and melody. Rhythm...and melody.

  55. #55
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    I am 41 and started getting back into shape about 2 months ago. Wow, it is rough but I am pushing through. It takes twice as long as it did when I was in my early 30's.

    Anyway, I have found that if I ride 2-3 times a weeks (12-15 miles each) and run 1-2 times a week (1-2 miles), my fitness is improving the quickest. I hate running. I hate running. But, the running is what is pushing my cardio to the next level each week when I get on the bike. If I don't run in a week, I find that my cardio does not advance near as quickly.

    Did I mention I hated running?
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  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrclortho View Post
    I am 41 and started getting back into shape about 2 months ago. Wow, it is rough but I am pushing through. It takes twice as long as it did when I was in my early 30's.

    Anyway, I have found that if I ride 2-3 times a weeks (12-15 miles each) and run 1-2 times a week (1-2 miles), my fitness is improving the quickest. I hate running. I hate running. But, the running is what is pushing my cardio to the next level each week when I get on the bike. If I don't run in a week, I find that my cardio does not advance near as quickly.

    Did I mention I hated running?
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  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrclortho View Post
    Did I mention I hated running?


    I'm not a fan of running either, for me it's just no fun. You can obtain good cardiovascular health without running though, my resting heart rate is 40bpm and I only cycle.
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  58. #58
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    If you haven't tried it, give trail running a try. I hate running on the road and even running long, straight wide paths. I do enjoy running singletrack through the woods.
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  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    If you haven't tried it, give trail running a try. I hate running on the road and even running long, straight wide paths. I do enjoy running singletrack through the woods.


    I've given it a whirl and my conclusion was that I much prefer walking.
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  60. #60
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    First of all, Bank5, as many have mentioned, it's adorable that you consider turning 40 "past your prime!" FYI, 51 is the new 27

    There's GREAT advice above, but I've got 7 additional tips & tricks for you:

    1) Ride a singlespeed mountainbike (or at least add one to your quiver). It's a legit, full body (and mind) workout. For bonus youth, make it a rigid singlespeed.
    2) Add a cheap singlespeed CX bike to your quiver (if you don't already have one). See tip/trick above... Plus it allows you to ride anywhere - road, gravel, neighborhood hills, singletrack - even when the weather sucks. In my 40s I was addicted to the trainer, but recently have found that using my SSCX as a trainer has been pivotal. Short, hilly, solo rides in crappy weather are mo betta for me.
    3) Set annual challenges, and don't fear the gamification of Strava. I climbed 153,000 feet, solely on SS, last year. And I'll do more this year. Telling people your challenge can be motivating.
    4) If you have a desk job, get a stand-up desk and stand on a wobble disc. Huge improvement to posture and subtle balance/core strengthening. And a no-brainer for cyclists.
    5) Do push-ups every day. Or at least every work day. Single best exercise to compliment cycling (especially rigid cycling) in my opinion.
    6) Eat 100% well (low carb, paleo-ish), 85% of the time. It's not hard and you'll find that you don't miss the bad stuff.
    7) Drink more green tea than coffee. I still rock plenty of espresso shots, but I drink 10x the volume of green tea. The stuff at Costco is amazing and relatively inexpensive.

    Enjoy your 40s!

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  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by CCSS View Post
    First of all, Bank5, as many have mentioned, it's adorable that you consider turning 40 "past your prime!" FYI, 51 is the new 27

    As far as cycling performance is concerned "prime" is about 30. I don't mean to be a buzz-kill but that's just reality. That said I'm enjoying my best performance in my mid-50's but that's because I didn't ride near as much then as I do now.


    Mostly good advice imo except #6, a high carb diet works great for me but I'm not everyone.
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  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    As far as cycling performance is concerned "prime" is about 30. I don't mean to be a buzz-kill but that's just reality.
    Ha, no doubt. I'm not shooting for winning Leadville or even the local race scene. Just for the most smiles per mile as we pedal into the sunset. As for #6, you're lucky!

  64. #64
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    It's nice to see how many are maintaining fitness into "middle age" and beyond. Personally, I don't do any workouts with weights, but I do have the old "Insanity" workouts that are a combination of plyo and calisthenics that give a serious workout. I also have an exercise bike that I try to ride at least twice during the week. On the rare occasion where I'll have both the time and motivation in the early morning I'll throw in a run, but that's not often. It's very rare that my tires see dirt more than once a week, so I try to do things at home to stay fit, mostly after the kids go to bed.
    My diet is still pretty random, but I've almost entirely cut out red meat, and I don't drink alcohol. Mostly I just drink tea. No snack foods or sweets, but I've never had a sweet tooth to begin with.
    One thing I do differently now is to pay more attention to my HR. Also, I've found that the recommended recovery times from my Garmin are fairly accurate. So if I have a tough ride and Garmin gives me a 2 day recovery period, I'll take the next day off and just do a recovery spin on the second day. Works well enough for me.
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    Itís definitely a challenge. Hereís what I do at age 64. Try to get 365 workouts a year. I double up enough days to make up for sick and travel days. Swim laps hard 3-4 days during bad weather, 1-2 when weather is nice. Sometimes at Lake with wetsuit. Run hard shorter distances (3 miles) on track one or two days a week. Lift one day a week. Paddle board hard as much as I can in summer. Plus ride road and trail, 5 days weather permitting, and once in a while a trainer.

    It sounds like a lot, but doing all these things allows me to work around fatigue (whipped legs, swim with pull buoy), and injuries.

    The key is working out hard.

    The bigger part of the equation is what, or how much, you eat. For me, no wheat or dairy, and one or two servings of red meat a month. I do eat sugar, but not too much of it. One beer is my limit, summer only, and only after a worthy ride.

    Itís a little easier being retired, no work or family to balance. I used to work with people with families who would be in the gym at 430 am, six days a week. Gotta find a Way!

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimmyAsheville View Post
    Itís definitely a challenge. Hereís what I do at age 64. Try to get 365 workouts a year. I double up enough days to make up for sick and travel days. Swim laps hard 3-4 days during bad weather, 1-2 when weather is nice. Sometimes at Lake with wetsuit. Run hard shorter distances (3 miles) on track one or two days a week. Lift one day a week. Paddle board hard as much as I can in summer. Plus ride road and trail, 5 days weather permitting, and once in a while a trainer.

    It sounds like a lot, but doing all these things allows me to work around fatigue (whipped legs, swim with pull buoy), and injuries.

    The key is working out hard.

    The bigger part of the equation is what, or how much, you eat. For me, no wheat or dairy, and one or two servings of red meat a month. I do eat sugar, but not too much of it. One beer is my limit, summer only, and only after a worthy ride.

    Itís a little easier being retired, no work or family to balance. I used to work with people with families who would be in the gym at 430 am, six days a week. Gotta find a Way!
    Damn! We can't go drinkin'. Hmmm... let's go ridin'!
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  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Aside from a lot of time doing my active, fun hobbies - mostly biking and xc skiing these days...

    Strength training with weights. Dead lift, squat, chins, rows, bench. Relatively heavy. Stimulates testosterone and that's what's needed to keep us strong and in shape. Mix in running here and there.

    If I workout hard with those things I find lesser lifts and stretching superfluous. Unless I'm rehabbing an injury.

    Don't smoke or drink too much alcohol, eat right/eat less, sleep a lot.
    I like your style! Heavy basic multi joint movements in the gym do far more for you than what i see most people do. Doing those and stretching will build a good foundation. Save the light weight kettle bell stuff and go ride to build balance.

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    I'm 37 (not old by any means but not young either) and getting to the point where I need year round fitness plan to maintain decent shape. I've gotten in much better shape in the last couple years mostly from riding and being better about my diet.

    I ride year round - less in the winter time due to being limited by fat biking. I'm lucky to have summers off so I ride a lot in the summer, usually 100-150 miles per week. Staying fit in the summer is easy - can do a 25-30 mile bike ride, climb 3k ft then go consume tacos and beer.

    The rest of the year I've had to adopt some news fitness habits because just riding just won't cut it year round.
    -I eat salads and fresh veggies for lunch everyday to cut calories and few things are better for you than raw veggies.
    -No alcohol during the week. Essential considering a 16oz IPA is 300+ calories
    -Yoga 2x/week to maintain flexibility
    -Spin class or Zwift 1-3x/week in the winter
    -I could better about taking in calories but I try to at least eat well during the work week.

    I'm probably in the best shape I've been in since I was in my early 20s but I still have room to get faster stronger.

    As for the 50+ guys - When I do XC races or gravel rides around here, I've noticed the fastest and most competitive age group (besides pros) are the 50+ guys. I've been humbled by guys 20 years older then me when it comes to cycling speed and overall fitness. Its great to see guys hammering in their 50s and its nice to know I've got a good 20 years of hard riding left.
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  69. #69
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    I'll second what CCSS said, since I didn't mention it before. My riding/conditioning plateau'd in 2008, when I was 46. I was riding pretty regularly, but had seemingly reached my "limit" on a bike.

    Looking for an additional challenge, I bought a cheap single speed. It cost me $349 shipped to my front door. It really wasn't set up for the mountains I ride, but all I had to do was change the front chain ring. That cheap-ass Motobecane changed my life. It hurt, but I didn't give up on it. After three months, it became my go to ride and now I haven't been on a geared mountain bike in nearly 4 years.

    I can't remember the last time I got off and pushed it up a hill. My SSs (I have three) are a full body workout on every ride. My wife even says I was never in better shape than I am now at 57.
    "And crawling on the planet's face, some insects called, The Human Race..."

  70. #70
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    59 and riding better than I ever have but I have found that old injuries squawk at me more as I age. Kind of gimpy every morning but I'm able to manage it. I ride 3X/week on pretty aggressive trails and that's plenty while allowing me to recuperate between rides. I still ski but it's usually no more than 10 days because it's a 2.5hr drive to get to VT or Maine making it a very long day.

    I had to give up hoops and running over 15 years ago to reduce pounding due to an ankle cartilage issue which I've had a couple of surgeries for. I've also had knee and shoulder injuries/surgeries which I feel after a good pound out on the trails. In all cases, once I get warmed up I still feel strong and can rip it with younger guys riding or skiing.

    One thing I need to do is get into a moderate strength training routine to keep muscles and joints strong between rides. I'm thinking 2-3 times per week. I have a bench and free weights kicking around so it's time to get to work!
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  71. #71
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    I'm 64. I just ride my mountain bike.

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    Damn! We can't go drinkin'. Hmmm... let's go ridin'!
    =sParty
    Believe me, that one beer tastes sooooo good after a ride 🙂

  73. #73
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    Life is to short to count calories! Go have fun with your kids, ride your bike and enjoy life.
    The most important thing is to stay active

  74. #74
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    I have never understood the SS thing, but it intrigues me. I do love climbing, and I do love torture, but I enjoy having the option of gears. Someone enlighten me. Is it just the fact that you have made yourself endure the difficulty of riding a SS, so that it becomes more enjoyable than having that option to gear down/up ?

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by splitendz View Post
    I have never understood the SS thing, but it intrigues me. I do love climbing, and I do love torture, but I enjoy having the option of gears. Someone enlighten me. Is it just the fact that you have made yourself endure the difficulty of riding a SS, so that it becomes more enjoyable than having that option to gear down/up ?
    SS changes the game. My SSs are light, nimble, quiet and efficient. It's more a mental test than a physical one. You're way more capable than you think you are. The SS helps you go beyond what you thought were your limits.


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    Last edited by chuckha62; 03-28-2019 at 01:05 PM.
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  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by splitendz View Post
    I have never understood the SS thing, but it intrigues me. I do love climbing, and I do love torture, but I enjoy having the option of gears. Someone enlighten me. Is it just the fact that you have made yourself endure the difficulty of riding a SS, so that it becomes more enjoyable than having that option to gear down/up ?
    This was me until about a month ago when I finally built up a SS after thinking about doing so for years. It really changes the experience. The simplicity is nice, but I like it because I am riding trails that I know very well in a much different way. specifically, I'm standing for most of the climbing, when I natural tendency is to sit and spin in an easy gear. And on the descents, I am looking for every little bump/rock/root and corner to pump and maintain or gain some speed because pedaling won't do it.

    After a ride, I feel like I got a total body workout from all the core engagement needed to stabilize when slowly cranking up steep climbs. I still like gears, and would never give them up on all bikes, but having a SS is great to bring some variety to the experience. Also great for a foul weather bike, because there's less nooks and crannies for mud to get stuck in.

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    SS changes the game. My SSs are light, nimble, quiet and efficient. It's more a mental test than a physical one. You're way more capable than you think you are. The SS helps you go beyond what you thought were your limits.


    Don't limit your challenges, challenge your limits.
    Wow, well said!

    I always default to the standard litany of reasons: lighter, less expensive, less to break, less to maintain, less wasted energy, less noise, more cerebral, better (full body) workout, and for me, more fun. Especially passing folks on $7500 dual squishies

  78. #78
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    SS is demanding and works your core which can make the most of shorter rides. I've got young kids and need to stay strong to handle their constant roughhousing and dangerous trampoline requests. I also do daily pushups. I feel like I'm in better shape than when I was 20 years ago.

  79. #79
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    sitting and climbing seems so uncomfortable to me....I get it for 5+ mile climbs, but for short stuff, it just seems sort of counter productive...I have never done a long climb ,so that is surely a different perspective...I am used to short punchy climbs...many in a row, with lots of tech involved. I feel like I have to stand to do it.

    I would also like to run my Krampus as single-speed, and might do a quick build SS rear wheel before I do a bike packing set up...of course, I need to also hit the lottery first, and have the step kids pay for their own college

    actually in the past week, have been leaving the gears alone while riding to see which combo feels the best...
    Go practice. Figure it out. - Fleas

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  80. #80
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    I generally shift gears to go faster, not the other way around.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  81. #81
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    Staying in shape is more of a state of mind. I always had this desire to finish an Ironman. So I hired a coach at age 40 and completed it at 41. The coach was great to keep me on a training schedule and such but once he saw my fitness level and my eating habits, he knew I wouldn't have any trouble with that life goal.

    I've always maintained a healthy lifestyle as much as possible. I do prescribe to the 'everything in moderation' motto. I eat red meat maybe 10 X's a year. It started to mess with me around the age of 30 so I just stopped eating it. (Although, if someone puts elk in front of me, I'll stuff myself. That's a delicious animal.)

    I've lived on skinless chicken and ground turkey most of my life. I seem to never tire of either. I don't eat fried or fast food. It tends to give me the rumbly in the tummy. I eat my veggies and fruit and try to eat oatmeal for breakfast (but as much as I tell myself I'm going to do this, I tend not too as much as I want or should do. I don't know why, oatmeal is delicious with some almond milk and berries.)

    I've always maintained an active lifestyle. I'm a biker at heart but I also enjoy running and have been a lifelong runner. I'm in AZ where the summers are blazing so I don't get out nearly like I want too so I try to do an AMRAP set 3 X's a week then. I rarely do that in the winter. I'm a cardio guy so weights is my personal h*ll. I know I need to do it more often but I really, really, really hate any type of weight training.

    I turn 47 tomorrow and I've found that I tend to enjoy my time exercising more as it's more of a mental game for me. It refreshes the mind and let's the body rest more. I do have days when I feel like doing nothing at all but force myself to at least get out. That's the toughest thing about aging for me. It's harder to force myself when I just don't feel like it because of the small aches and pains but I seem to almost always be able to motivate myself for something.

    All that said, moderation is a key for me for the diet. I eat healthy probably 80% of the time. I'm not giving up my Doritos, peanut M&Ms, beer or whiskey. Life is to be enjoyed and those things bring me joy. I'm not a drunk but a few beers after a ride or a late night glass of whiskey is good for the mind and soul.

    Oh and I've been taking Relief Factor for about 4 years now. It's really improved my joint health.
    Why would I need more than one gear?
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  82. #82
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    Do you have a little space and money to invest in a home gym? Wouldnít take much, but you can be as fancy as you want. If you want a great piece of cardio equipment, I like rowing. I think it compliments biking in the off-season - if you are doing it right, you use lots of quads. Bodyweight exercises are under-rated (burpees, lunges, 1-leg squats, handstands, handstand pushups, pushups, planks, etc). I also find a strong core to be one of the most useful parts of my workouts. Maybe you can get the kids involved with you - start them on the path to a healthy life early!
    One of these opposing things I do to stay in shape is bouldering. Lots of upper body and core strentgh involved. Itís very mental, as mountain biking can be sometimes. Kids also love that sport. I see tiny kids in the bouldering gym who kick my ass at climbing!

  83. #83
    Rod
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    I'm in my mid 30's, but the thing that I have learned more than anything is flexibility. I've had many aches, pains, and injuries from the lack of flexibility. A year ago it hurt to walk and I was forced to stop playing basketball, but it was solved by simple stretching. My left knee was popping and tracking incorrectly this year, which was a tight IT band. An inexpensive foam roller and learning how to use it is a game changer.

  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod View Post
    I'm in my mid 30's, but the thing that I have learned more than anything is flexibility. I've had many aches, pains, and injuries from the lack of flexibility. A year ago it hurt to walk and I was forced to stop playing basketball, but it was solved by simple stretching. My left knee was popping and tracking incorrectly this year, which was a tight IT band. An inexpensive foam roller and learning how to use it is a game changer.
    One of my riding buddies is a PT. He gives me stretching and strength training exercises all the time for my little aches and pains. He's fixed each hip at different times and my knee. Stretching is great but I don't do it enough. I hate strength training but do I as a necessary evil.... Not as much as I should though.

    I've been using a foam roller since turning 40 so 7 years now and it helps more things than anything else. Highly recommend one!


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    Why would I need more than one gear?
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  85. #85
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    Intermittent fasting and gym. No junk food. Only once in a while.

  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I'm not a fan of running either, for me it's just no fun. You can obtain good cardiovascular health without running though, my resting heart rate is 40bpm and I only cycle.
    Yeah, running is miserable but a few miles a week helps my joints a lot so I just do it.

  87. #87
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    Turning 70 in June and I'm in much better shape then when I turned 40.

    I was over weight big time back then. Eventually, when I turned 50, I took off 50 pounds and have kept most of it off since.

    So, suggestions? Nah, nothing earth shattering. I've always said if you don't keep moving, you won't keep moving. That's it. Walk, ride, ski, run, do anything it takes to keep moving so when you actually get old, you'll still be moving.

  88. #88
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    Turning 53 this year...

    Biking 90-110mi weekly, metal drumming, and lifting weights (at home), does it for me. I eat clean but do moderately drink (craft beer, and mezcal) and smoke da ganja. I'm 6' and a solid 175.

    I feel my best when I eat well and keep moving... \m/
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  89. #89
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    I'm 64 and I ride. You usually can't tell my age so much with my helmet and sport glasses on either. I'm not trying to kill myself riding. I do take rest stops when I need to on the climbs. I just did about 15 miles on mountain biking last Sunday.

  90. #90
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    Great tips guys, subbing. I just turned 47 and feel pretty rough with back and neck pain, and hardly any time to ride.

    For those that do yoga, are you self taught or do you do it in a class? Interested in trying that.

  91. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodchips View Post
    Turning 53 this year...

    Biking 90-110mi weekly, metal drumming, and lifting weights (at home), does it for me. I eat clean but do moderately drink (craft beer, and mezcal) and smoke da ganja. I'm 6' and a solid 175.

    I feel my best when I eat well and keep moving... \m/
    the metal drumming is the secret to youth for sure!!! Been doing that since '76...

    hell yeah...Up The Irons!!!
    Go practice. Figure it out. - Fleas

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  92. #92
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    I'm 55. I got out of shape in my forties (kids, residency training, divorce and am now in much better shape. Finally got serious about losing weight and am heading down to my goal of 180 by the 2020 Tour Divide.

    I ride as much as I can and use my indoor trainer when I can't (which is a very effective way to train if you push yourself). i also go to the gym a couple of times a weeks for strength training.

    My beautiful wife, who is 14 years younger, protects my workout and riding time. She's very fit herself and has really helped get me back into shape.

    I don't think it's that much harder to be healthy in your fifties compared to your twenties and thirties. Recovery takes longer and you are more prone to injuries but the principles are the same.

  93. #93
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    48 here. Started riding when I turned 40 because of kids and not being able to travel on weekends for rock climbing. Iím in good shape. I just follow one rule. DONíT STOP MOVING. I ride 4 to 6 days a week, year round. I ski in the winter, climb and backpack in warmer months. I stretch, do upper body work, and actively play with the kids. As soon as you stop moving, itís hard to get the ball moving again, physically and mentally.




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  94. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by cackalacky View Post
    For those that do yoga, are you self taught or do you do it in a class? Interested in trying that.
    I have done all of my yoga off DVDs or YouTube. Iím sure that my form leaves a lot to be desired, but even so I am convinced it does me a great deal of good just to do the best I can. Truth be told I am working around an arthritic hip and I am scared that any ďcorrectionsĒ I get in a class are going to do more harm than good as nobody knows my body as well as I do.

  95. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by Horseshoe View Post
    I have done all of my yoga off DVDs or YouTube. Iím sure that my form leaves a lot to be desired, but even so I am convinced it does me a great deal of good just to do the best I can. Truth be told I am working around an arthritic hip and I am scared that any ďcorrectionsĒ I get in a class are going to do more harm than good as nobody knows my body as well as I do.
    I am also self taught....I have always had an aversion to doing that kind of stuff in a group...I also work out after 11pm b/c no one is in the gym then...I have to go at my own pace, and with my own program to really enjoy it
    Go practice. Figure it out. - Fleas

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  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by bank5 View Post
    I'm nearing 40 and have a couple young kids and haven't been riding as much as I'd like. I'm curious to hear from others who are probably past their prime. What works for you to stay in great shape?
    You might want to read from the Fifty + forum.
    I would say i am in good shape at 61.
    What works for me is no car the last 19 years, i do not take the bus so i pedal about 360 days, rain, snow, ice...
    Frequency helps, avoiding competition to avoid injuries and flexibility.
    It is kind of easy to be 80-85% in shape. Athletes to be pro need that 90-100% zone but that makes them prone to injuries.
    I only have a 5$ watch so i know i pedal 2, 3, 4 hours but i do not mesure average speed, top speed, etc... A 100 YO man(Jack Rabbit) said when asked i do enough to sweat everyday and he died at 111, sick only the last 8 months. I was fortunate enough to meet him when i was 20, he was 103 and smiling.
    My waist line is 28 in and eating enough raw foods is a good way to stay slim no need to mention lots of veggies.

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