Results 1 to 57 of 57

Thread: Spin classes

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    1

    Spin classes

    Hey guys,

    I've got a couple questions I'd like to ask everyone to get some feedback on spin classes you've done in the past and how often you currently ride your own bikes. Thanks for the help!

    What do you like about spin classes?

    What do you wish was different?

    Do you go to spin classes? If so, how often?

    Do you use a bike trainer at home instead or in addition to spin classes?

    How many times per week do you ride your personal bike?

    Would you go to a class that utilized trainers instead of spin bikes?

  2. #2
    U sayin' Bolt ?
    Reputation: knutso's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,236
    Spin class??? I always thought that was for people who didn't ride bikes irl. If you're a cyclist and at the gym, probably best to swim or cross train in some fashion.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    18
    I don't do spin classes, but I do use the spin bike at my gym 2-3 times a week after work depending on my schedule. I only use the trainers if there's no spin bike available.

    I do workouts off of Training Peaks.

    I ride my real bike mostly just on weekends.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MSU Alum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    3,308
    Sounds very roadie-centric!
    Last time I was in "spin class" was in the Navy, practicing recoveries from upright and inverted spins/out of control flight. That was 30 years ago.

  5. #5
    Bikesexual
    Reputation: jcd46's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    5,974
    Don't like gyms, I have been thinking of taking yoga tough.
    The Orange Fleet:

    '16 SC Heckler
    '14 All City MMD
    '12 Kona Unit Rigid

  6. #6
    jcd's best friend
    Reputation: Battery's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    1,256
    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    Don't like gyms, I have been thinking of taking yoga tough.
    Trek Emonda | Transition Sentinel

  7. #7
    100% PRIME ALBERTA BEEF
    Reputation: mtnbkrmike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    2,210
    Spin class can definitely have its perks...

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    4,655
    I used to do spin classes after or before work, particularly in the winter, along with some resistance training as a way to get some decent cardio in on days I wouldn't otherwise be able to ride. The instructors sometimes have you do weird stuff, but it's definitely better than not getting any exercise. Like a lot of things, it's what you make of it.
    Do the math.

  9. #9
    CEO Product Failure
    Reputation: bingemtbr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    928

    Cool-blue Rhythm

    Quote Originally Posted by zruppel View Post
    Hey guys,

    I've got a couple questions I'd like to ask everyone to get some feedback on spin classes you've done in the past and how often you currently ride your own bikes. Thanks for the help!

    What do you like about spin classes?

    What do you wish was different?

    Do you go to spin classes? If so, how often?

    Do you use a bike trainer at home instead or in addition to spin classes?

    How many times per week do you ride your personal bike?

    Would you go to a class that utilized trainers instead of spin bikes?
    I have taught indoor cycling since 2011. Indoor cycling is considered "Group Fit", group fitness classes. The social aspect keeps riders returning. Fitness and social reasons are why people attend. The most spin classes I have ridden in a week is 17. I have both a trainer and a Keiser spin bike. The Keiser spin bike is better than my trainer. However a Zwift smart trainer is on my Christmas list. I ride out doors 4-6 times per week regardless of spin class. Regarding trainers vs spin bikes, for a commercial group fit class, spin bikes are the only equipment that will hold up: multiple users who dont care about the equipment plus several classes per day, equates to equipment with thousands of miles on it within a year. Spin bikes have a maintenance program and can be refurbished. Trainers are intended for a personal use. I am uncertain to the extent a trainer can be rebuilt or maintained.

    You're welcome to PM me with any other questions.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dylandewandel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    21
    Spinning can be great for improving your cardiovascular efficiency, it's even lower impact than actual cycling. If you can accept the fact that you're stationary and there's no wind and no real excitement from actually moving through an environment, then you're onto something.

    I can only tolerate about 10 minutes of stationary before I lose all focus and would rather go ride outdoors on an actual bicycle.. and yes, I'm including virtual trainers like zwift. I'm not a fan, but some people prefer it.

    As far as the social aspects of stationary group spinning.. I cannot attest.

  11. #11
    Let's just wheelie!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    43
    I don't use a trainer or a stationary bike. I ride year round and work in a retail store where I get about 4 hours of cardio per shift. Don't need a gym or indoor trainer.

  12. #12
    I have Flat Pedal shame.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    745
    Quote Originally Posted by bingemtbr View Post
    I have taught indoor cycling since 2011. Indoor cycling is considered "Group Fit", group fitness classes. The social aspect keeps riders returning. Fitness and social reasons are why people attend. The most spin classes I have ridden in a week is 17. I have both a trainer and a Keiser spin bike. The Keiser spin bike is better than my trainer. However a Zwift smart trainer is on my Christmas list. I ride out doors 4-6 times per week regardless of spin class. Regarding trainers vs spin bikes, for a commercial group fit class, spin bikes are the only equipment that will hold up: multiple users who dont care about the equipment plus several classes per day, equates to equipment with thousands of miles on it within a year. Spin bikes have a maintenance program and can be refurbished. Trainers are intended for a personal use. I am uncertain to the extent a trainer can be rebuilt or maintained.

    You're welcome to PM me with any other questions.
    17 spin classes + 6 outdoor rides per week = cyclesick
    We don't ride to add days to our life, we ride to add life to the days we have left here.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Crankout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2,755
    I'm a regular at my gym Spin/Cycling classes in the winter when daylight is nill.

    I attend 3-4x/week, getting in early to extend my cycling time. They're extremely beneficial for a number of reasons (ex. cadence & power are easier to control than on the trails or road).

    I find being in a group as a motivator vs sitting alone at home on a trainer.

    Some instructors are my cycling-oriented while others add the goofy fluff (ex. running on the bike). I opt out of during those classes and focus on my effort and form.

    There are shops and studios that offer trainer sessions but lugging the bike around is an added pain in the sack that I'd prefer to avoid. I get an excellent workout on the Spin bikes.
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    136
    I agree with Crank, a spin bike is a great tool to maintain fitness in the winter. I'll go 4x per week but almost never to a class. I like putting in my earbuds and doing my own thing. Its surprising how fast 50 min. will go by.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    3,227
    I have buddies that spin through the winter. They sure talk about it a lot. Come spring when I get back on my bike they are definitely more fit than I am. I can barely keep up and am smoked at the end of a ride. However this is very short lived. After 3-5 rides I can hang and after 3 weeks to a month I begin to pull away. Come August when I'm peaking it's hard to get those guys to come do big rides and they're dusted start to finish. With that I think one can pick up bad habits spinning or get some type of burn out. I experience something very similar but worse with guys that primarily climb in gyms.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    5,108
    I like to ride my bikes outside. Spin or trainer would defeat that purpose. So that would be never. # of bike rides per week? 2-3 times on average.

  17. #17
    One ring to mash them all
    Reputation: the one ring's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    1,061
    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Spin class can definitely have its perks...
    Yep, one of a handful of cases where the scenery not changing can be a good thing.
    You are not required to set yourself on fire to keep other people warm.

  18. #18
    Barely in control
    Reputation: Schulze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    1,835
    Spoiler Alert: You go in circles.

  19. #19
    Pro Crastinator
    Reputation: .WestCoastHucker.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,268
    spin classes? lolz! ride your bike more...


  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Crankout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2,755
    Quote Originally Posted by .WestCoastHucker. View Post
    spin classes? lolz! ride your bike more...
    Lack of daylight and snowy cold days make it tougher for some. I used to routinely ride in the winter slop with a large group, but that fell apart. I now find that going to these classes is tough and pays off later.
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    4,655
    Yeah. It's not always practical or feasible to ride. You can get in some good aerobics and HIIT in a spin class. A good alternative is a trainer at home, but I find it too easy to grab a brewsky instead. Whatever I can do between riding, spinning, and my trainer is all good.
    Do the math.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Coal-Cracker's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    377
    Unfortunately, I dont have anywhere local to me that offers spin classes.
    A few years ago, I bought a spinbike that I ride when weather doesn't cooperate.
    I have it placed in front of a large screen TV where I can access various YouTube training vids.
    It's not as good as the 'real thing,' but it is better than nothing. And that's 'something'. Right?

    Sent from my SM-G935V using Tapatalk

  23. #23
    psycho cyclo addict
    Reputation: edubfromktown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,511
    I've done spin classes a few times. Both multiple days for a few weeks and occasional one-offs.

    I find no advantage to participating in them and actually felt like they negatively impacted my endurance and performance in the "real world" on gravel/trails/paths/rocks, etc.
    【ツ】 eDub 【ツ】

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    7

    Spin rocks

    Quote Originally Posted by zruppel View Post
    Hey guys,

    I've got a couple questions I'd like to ask everyone to get some feedback on spin classes you've done in the past and how often you currently ride your own bikes. Thanks for the help!

    What do you like about spin classes?

    What do you wish was different?

    Do you go to spin classes? If so, how often?

    Do you use a bike trainer at home instead or in addition to spin classes?

    How many times per week do you ride your personal bike?

    Would you go to a class that utilized trainers instead of spin bikes?
    I used to LOVE spin class! The one I went to was mountain bike specific, with an ex-pro instructor, and it was a blast. Not only was there a disco ball and a fog machine, but the workout was seriously the most difficult thing I've ever done. I went once a week for nearly 8 years, and I miss it so much. (I moved away, and the spin classes here are boring by comparison.)

    I like spin class when it's too dark/cold to ride, plus it's so intense you can get a great workout in a short (1 hour) amount of time. I like that I push harder (sprints!) in the class than I do on the trail. I like the social aspect -- being around other people makes me want to push harder, and I don't want to be "that person" who eases up on the resistance, or cuts the sprint short. I don't have to wear so much cold-weather gear, because it's indoors.

    And I've discovered some music I like in spin class as well!

    I've done in-home rides on my trainer to YouTube workouts. That's okay. But I prefer to get out of the house and shake things up a bit more. As for trainers vs spin bikes, I don't think I would care too much either way. It's not the bike, it's the workout/coach/people/vibe.

    I don't think I would want to do spin workouts more than once a week, just because of personal preference, but there's absolutely no way I could give myself the same high intensity intervals on my own, out on the road or trail. I definitely reaped the benefits of that class in terms of fitness, and made some friends.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    32
    I recently found a spin class taught by a cyclist/ironman (woman)/coach.

    Her classes are short intense intervals with minimal recovery, similar to the interval workouts I used to do on a trainer when I worked with a coach.

    I'm hoping this will help develop explosiveness, which is so important in mountain bike riding.

    Some spin classes are like Zumba classes on a bike and I avoid those like the plague.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ravewoofer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    391
    I spin 2-3 time weekly off season and once a week while riding the mountain bike. The key is to ride with young, fit instructors. Theyíll kick your ass and take no prisoners.

    Riding through the winter makes you very much in shape for Spring riding.

    One reason I ride solo, is because my buddies canít hang with me once Iím in spin shape.

    45 minutes of full on spinning makes it easy to ride non stop for two hours on the bike. Really not out of breath, nor tired.

    12 years of spin class has made me really fit and energetic. Itís really the secret weapon for spanking the trails and riders.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    141
    We (my wife and I) do a spin class once a week. We do HIIT/metcon type weight and bodyweight conditioning on other days.

    Our gym is a Les Mills gym which is a specific programming. They have one set of classes called RPM and another set of classes called Sprint, which, to me, are more similar to mountain biking.

    Anyway, even though the programming on the songs is the same and the "routine" is the same, a good instructor makes a big difference in how hard they'll push you.

    One thing I've found myself doing, though, is to try to maintain cadence and just vary resistance more regardless of what the routine supposedly dictates. There is a lot of "pedal really fast... sprint sprint sprint.... we're racing!" sections of the class where they're trying to encourage you to just spin super fast. I don't really find this being that applicable to mountain biking, personally, so I've started just maintaining a slightly sped up cadence and increasing resistance a lot more. My heart rate still hits the same zone as the fast cadence sprint they're encouraging, but I also feel like I'm building more ability in my legs to push a heavier resistance (climb).

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Crankout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2,755
    Quote Originally Posted by hogfly View Post
    We (my wife and I) do a spin class once a week. We do HIIT/metcon type weight and bodyweight conditioning on other days.

    Our gym is a Les Mills gym which is a specific programming. They have one set of classes called RPM and another set of classes called Sprint, which, to me, are more similar to mountain biking.

    Anyway, even though the programming on the songs is the same and the "routine" is the same, a good instructor makes a big difference in how hard they'll push you.

    One thing I've found myself doing, though, is to try to maintain cadence and just vary resistance more regardless of what the routine supposedly dictates. There is a lot of "pedal really fast... sprint sprint sprint.... we're racing!" sections of the class where they're trying to encourage you to just spin super fast. I don't really find this being that applicable to mountain biking, personally, so I've started just maintaining a slightly sped up cadence and increasing resistance a lot more. My heart rate still hits the same zone as the fast cadence sprint they're encouraging, but I also feel like I'm building more ability in my legs to push a heavier resistance (climb).
    I do the same when the instructor dictates certain moves that I either don't feel apply to real-world cycling (such as standing and spinning at 100 rpm's) or sitting and pushing max gears that will shred your knees and back.

    I've got my favored instructors who tend to 'get' cycling.
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

  29. #29
    100% PRIME ALBERTA BEEF
    Reputation: mtnbkrmike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    2,210
    Quote Originally Posted by Crankout View Post
    I do the same when the instructor dictates certain moves that I either don't feel apply to real-world cycling (such as standing and spinning at 100 rpm's) or sitting and pushing max gears that will shred your knees and back.

    I've got my favored instructors who tend to 'get' cycling.
    During my limited time in spin classes, I found that the instructor made all the difference in the world. Some were awesome, and some were pretty arrogant gym rats who thought they were real world bikers when it was crystal clear they had not spent more than a few hours in their life on dirt (or pavement for that matter).

    I also found some to be deserving of a solid elbow smash to the nose when they would get off their bikes, walk around, look at people's screen readouts and tell them to ramp things up when clearly the person was ramped up as much as they could or wanted to be, and was visibly embarrassed by the BS.

    Some of those instructors thought they were hot shit and were a super huge turn off. I talked to people in the classes afterwards, and they all agreed with my observations.

    I learned that the days when the good instructors were there were always jammed, while the days with the idiots were a third full.

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: juan_speeder's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,410
    Quote Originally Posted by zruppel View Post
    Hey guys,

    I've got a couple questions I'd like to ask everyone to get some feedback on spin classes you've done in the past and how often you currently ride your own bikes. Thanks for the help!

    What do you like about spin classes?

    What do you wish was different?

    Do you go to spin classes? If so, how often?

    Do you use a bike trainer at home instead or in addition to spin classes?

    How many times per week do you ride your personal bike?

    Would you go to a class that utilized trainers instead of spin bikes?
    I did a spin class once. The fifteen foot diameter puddle of sweat that developed under my bike, and the people's surrounding me was pretty embarrassing.

    Never went back. Plus they wanted me to pedal at 30 rpm at times, which totally felt wrong.
    Scarlett Johansson loves my hummus.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation: screamingbunny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    810

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    4,655
    Quote Originally Posted by juan_speeder View Post
    ...Never went back. Plus they wanted me to pedal at 30 rpm at times, which totally felt wrong.
    Not too diff from powering up a very steep hill. Slow hard effort is a resistance exercise to build strength and fast low effort is aerobic exercise to build endurance. Both can be appropriate and beneficial. Things like pedaling at high cadence while standing and high resistance at low cadence can expand your performance envelope. Exercise care and use good form to minimize potential for injury, and you have to build up rather than overexert and strain yourself. It's up to you to know your limits and perform/modify exercises as needed.

    I don't get the embarrassment part. Working out and exercising aint meant to be pretty.
    Do the math.

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation: June Bug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,777
    I've done a few spin classes at my local Gold's Gym, where I get a free membership. I liked the class OK, but being in a small room crowded with sweating people, and inevitably a few who will be "working through a cold," and I've not gone back this winter, although maybe I'll try again. It's a good workout. Also, I tried to strike up casual conversation with a few people about cycling, only to realize that, although fully kitted out, the only cycling they do is on a stationary bike.

    My friend goes to a high-end spin "studio". They give out ear plugs ahead of class, because the music is So. F**king. Loud. I guess you aren't getting a good workout unless you're suffering hearing loss.
    The best defense against bullsh*t is vigilance. If you smell something, say something.
    Jon Stewart

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Crankout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2,755
    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    Not too diff from powering up a very steep hill. Slow hard effort is a resistance exercise to build strength and fast low effort is aerobic exercise to build endurance. Both can be appropriate and beneficial. Things like pedaling at high cadence while standing and high resistance at low cadence can expand your performance envelope. Exercise care and use good form to minimize potential for injury, and you have to build up rather than overexert and strain yourself. It's up to you to know your limits and perform/modify exercises as needed.

    I don't get the embarrassment part. Working out and exercising aint meant to be pretty.
    I avoid the standing high-cadence stuff as well as the seated maxed-out pushes. I will mash a harder gear for sure, but not top end where I can barely turn the pedals. Brutal on the knees and not really duplicated on the hills.
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Crankout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2,755
    Quote Originally Posted by June Bug View Post
    Also, I tried to strike up casual conversation with a few people about cycling, only to realize that, although fully kitted out,

    .
    I am one of those kitted-out guys, although with many years of riding under me. I feel like a douche sometimes in my gear but it's absolutely functional. I'm not about to wear my work-out shorts and cotton shirts in spin class. However, I need to order up some generic jerseys to wear instead of my team stuff, but that's I got for now.
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ravewoofer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    391
    Quote Originally Posted by Crankout View Post
    I am one of those kitted-out guys, although with many years of riding under me. I feel like a douche sometimes in my gear but it's absolutely functional. I'm not about to wear my work-out shorts and cotton shirts in spin class. However, I need to order up some generic jerseys to wear instead of my team stuff, but that's I got for now.
    Same here. Iím Mr. Lycra Sidi

    At 56, I need any advantage I can get. I really should change my name to Mr. Bib Lycra Sidi.

    I do a set or two of weights in that kit, too, along with roadie gloves. I wear the gloves spinning, because I donít like having a sweaty grip on the bars.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    32
    So, I just came from spin class.

    It was taught by a triathlete/cyclist (both road and mountain).

    We did a 15 min, a 10 min, and a 5 minute interval.

    We broke up the intervals into one minute segments, changing cadence, standing or sitting, and power output.

    I pretty much wanted to die the entire time.

    After a short recovery from the above, we did a bunch of shorter sprint intervals with minimal rest.

    I have to believe this will translate to better performance on the bike.

    I'm not kidding myself though. While spin classes help, my experience has been there is no substitute for real saddle time, although it must be quality time, even if that means quality recovery time.

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    141
    I have pretty good base fitness in general, but....

    I did pretty much nothing but spin last winter season for true conditioning. I had very few long days on the bike in the Winter, only occasional hour long rides on nicer days (mainly riding with my son then, so nothing very long). I went out in January and did one of our more challenging rides Upper Buffalo Headwaters Challenge which is 29 miles, with 3,000 ft of climbing. It was also a mudder due to some rain, so conditions sucked.

    I finished. None of the rest of my group did. So yeah, I think that it definitely helps with conditioning, even if it sucks sometimes.

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    182
    I attended some spin classes while preparing for a 50-mile ride.

    Pros:

    Hard work-out
    More motivated with group than riding solo on stationary bike
    Takes less time than gearing up and driving to local trails
    Long, steady climbs seemed to translate well to my 50 miler
    No chance of going OTB!

    Cons:

    Blaring music and nearly impossible to hear instructor sometimes
    Even when you work hard it is much easier than mtnb--don't really need to use core and it is more of a leg-work-out
    Seems more geared toward road bikes

  40. #40
    100% PRIME ALBERTA BEEF
    Reputation: mtnbkrmike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    2,210
    Quote Originally Posted by drich View Post
    ...Seems more geared toward road bikes
    Every spin class I attended was more geared towards 20-some and 30-some year olds doing a cardio and calorie burn, trying to get their butts and abs ripped.

    As far as I could see, the primary objective of those classes had nothing to do with conditioning for biking. Zero. I'm sure it helped on the trail for me to some degree, but that was not the goal for those in the class.

    In fact, the last 15 minutes of most classes consisted of an off the bike, on the floor ab and glutes workout.

    Clearly, there were very few (if any) in the class who put in any time outside the gym on a real bike - road or mountain. Their biking was 100% indoors. And that included all the instructors.

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Crankout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2,755
    Quote Originally Posted by drich View Post
    I attended some spin classes while preparing for a 50-mile ride.

    Pros:

    Hard work-out
    More motivated with group than riding solo on stationary bike
    Takes less time than gearing up and driving to local trails
    Long, steady climbs seemed to translate well to my 50 miler
    No chance of going OTB!

    Cons:

    Blaring music and nearly impossible to hear instructor sometimes
    Even when you work hard it is much easier than mtnb--don't really need to use core and it is more of a leg-work-out
    Seems more geared toward road bikes
    I agree on many of your points. I do have to say, though, that after some of my classes I'm totally gassed and will feel it the next day. More so than on many of my typical outdoor training rides, minus the hard days.
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Crankout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2,755
    Quote Originally Posted by ravewoofer View Post
    Same here. Iím Mr. Lycra Sidi

    At 56, I need any advantage I can get. I really should change my name to Mr. Bib Lycra Sidi.

    I do a set or two of weights in that kit, too, along with roadie gloves. I wear the gloves spinning, because I donít like having a sweaty grip on the bars.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    You're much braver than me. I wear shorts or sweats over my bike shorts until I get into the studio, and put them back on when I head back to the locker room. No stops in between for me!
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ravewoofer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    391
    My last ride was killer, long , fast paced climbing, tabatas tossed in, too.

    Hereís the stats for 45 minutes. Honestly donít know if the numbers are good or bad, but I was beat after that. Next day, too.

    Spinning tonight, too.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ravewoofer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    391

    Spin classes

    So I went tonight, same bike, different instructor and what I thought was an easier ride, but the stats donít lie.


    Cranked it, felt good. Monday, really hard workout but lower numbers.
    Go figure.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    32
    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Every spin class I attended was more geared towards 20-some and 30-some year olds doing a cardio and calorie burn, trying to get their butts and abs ripped.

    As far as I could see, the primary objective of those classes had nothing to do with conditioning for biking. Zero. I'm sure it helped on the trail for me to some degree, but that was not the goal for those in the class.

    In fact, the last 15 minutes of most classes consisted of an off the bike, on the floor ab and glutes workout.

    Clearly, there were very few (if any) in the class who put in any time outside the gym on a real bike - road or mountain. Their biking was 100% indoors. And that included all the instructors.
    Yes, this.

    A lot of spin classes are Zumba classes done on a bike...and as mentioned above, sometimes off the bike.

    I feel very fortunate to have found a spinning instructor that is a serious road and mountain bike cyclist.

    Her workouts are very similar to the interval workouts that I used to do on my rollers or on the road, back in the day.

    Spin classes though, are only one small piece of the puzzle.

  46. #46
    My cup runneth over
    Reputation: rmac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    2,333
    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Every spin class I attended was more geared towards 20-some and 30-some year olds doing a cardio and calorie burn, trying to get their butts and abs ripped.

    As far as I could see, the primary objective of those classes had nothing to do with conditioning for biking. Zero. I'm sure it helped on the trail for me to some degree, but that was not the goal for those in the class.

    In fact, the last 15 minutes of most classes consisted of an off the bike, on the floor ab and glutes workout.

    Clearly, there were very few (if any) in the class who put in any time outside the gym on a real bike - road or mountain. Their biking was 100% indoors. And that included all the instructors.
    THIS. I did spin classes over the winters for several years. One of the instructors was a mtb triathlete that I competed against regularly at the time. After a few years of being disappointed with my spring fitness I gave up on the spin class since I wasnít getting the mtb benefit I was hoping for and started riding at night and learned to ride on snow/ice. It is a little strange that although I was getting a massive cardio workout it didnít translate very well to mtb fitness.

    I am off the bike right now from an injury and riding a stationary bike not in a class and really trying to mimic the mtb hill climbing feeling in my legs. Hoping it helps me maintain some mtb fitness.

  47. #47
    Formerly of Kent
    Reputation: Le Duke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    9,905
    I donít get spin classes for people that own actual bicycles.

    For the amount of money youíll spend on spin classes three days a week over the winter, you could buy a power-measuring trainer. You could then race Zwift or do TrainerRoad workouts in the comfort of your own house.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Death from Below.

  48. #48
    100% PRIME ALBERTA BEEF
    Reputation: mtnbkrmike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    2,210
    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    I donít get spin classes for people that own actual bicycles.

    For the amount of money youíll spend on spin classes three days a week over the winter, you could buy a power-measuring trainer. You could then race Zwift or do TrainerRoad workouts in the comfort of your own house.
    For the limited time I went, the classes were free. They were included with the fitness facility in the building I worked at, which was a tenants only deal. It was a sweet deal. Brand new and SUPER nice free weights (olympic and non-olympic barbells, and a gigantic dumbbell set), machines, Smith machines, cages, treadmills, elipticals, stair climbers, bikes, recumbents, and their spin class bikes were equally nice as well. I can't recall the name of them but I was so impressed at the time, that I googled the brand and sure enough, they were touted online as being THE BEST spin class bikes made.

    Despite all that, those classes were lame AF. Except for the scenery which was generally outstanding. And sometimes the tunes were pretty cutting edge so it was an easy way for me to be able to keep up with what was relevant in the world, music-wise.

    Better than nothing, but yeah - agreed. Nothing beats actual mileage. Outside. But if you want a 6 pack and glutes you can bounce a quarter off of, those classes were probably pretty decent.

  49. #49
    Anytime. Anywhere.
    Reputation: Travis Bickle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,123
    I went to a few while I was posted to a brigade headquarters. Lame AF. A few times I rode my bike 18 km to the gym on beautiful mornings to attend spin class. F#@*ing treadmills were always full too, even in good weather. I used to look forward to the runs or marches, at least we were outside. When I retired I moved to a place where I can get enough riding over the winter to not worry about spinning or trainers.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    1,162
    I donít do spin classes because I donít need the motivational patter and I hate loud music and working out in a group. But I have an indoor trainer and I get a pretty good workout on it.

    Itís my primary winter cycling workout up here in Michigan during the cold months. Plus I work a lot so my ride time is limited. Indoor training is high yield because you are never coasting, going downhill, or benefiting from a tailwind.

    I bought the same trainer they have at my gym, a Keiser M3plus. I try to do two indoor days, then one gym day for upper body. I do abs and core on indoor training days.

    Iím trying to improve my fitness and lose weight for the Dirty Kanza in June (hopefully) and the Tour Divide in 2020.

    Roughly, and just going by ďcalories burned,Ē a hard, 90 minute training session is the equivalent of a three hour ride on the local gravel and dirt.


    The bike said my average power was 205 watts and I burned 1300 calories.

    1/4 horsepower. Itís amazing how little power we put out. I have a friend who can sustain close to 400 Watts.


    Spin classes-0fdc9d41-394d-43e5-8b2d-0c1e60985084.jpg[attach=config]1227172

  51. #51
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: AshevilleMTB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    1,812
    Quote Originally Posted by dylandewandel View Post

    I can only tolerate about 10 minutes of stationary before I lose all focus
    Right there with ya. The only thing that helps is watching MTB videos. I can maybe push it 20 minutes then.

  52. #52
    achiever
    Reputation: redwarrior's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    897
    I used to be the same way but I found that pushing myself up to 85%+ max heart rate or some kind of structured high intensity intervals makes things go by much quicker. No way I can pay attention to anything other than the workout at that type of intensity. That said, when I need a recovery effort, 1/2 easy is absolute torture.

    Quote Originally Posted by AshevilleMTB View Post
    Right there with ya. The only thing that helps is watching MTB videos. I can maybe push it 20 minutes then.

  53. #53
    Anytime. Anywhere.
    Reputation: Travis Bickle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,123
    Quote Originally Posted by AshevilleMTB View Post
    Right there with ya. The only thing that helps is watching MTB videos. I can maybe push it 20 minutes then.
    Yup, 20 minutes feels like 12 hours.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Ltdan12a's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    238
    I've attended spin classes with a few different instructors, and this is what I've taken away from them:

    1: The instructor really sets the tone of the class. Find one who's class fits what your looking for. I wasn't interested in any of the free weights or off the bike stuff, but liked the "core" workouts that can be included.

    2: Don't let the ladies discourage you. Every class I've done, the ratio of women to men has been about 10-1.. Once they realize you're there for the workout, and not to look at their asses, it gets a lot more welcoming.

    3: You get out what you put in. most people in a spin class come out of it "glistening", dabbing a towel on their forehead. I usually have a small lake of sweat on the floor under me, and look like I spent a week in the Hanoi Hilton getting interrogated. Turn the resistance up, get that heartrate up, and punish yourself.

    4: Remember your settings- Once you have the bike set up like you want, record/memorize where everything is!!

    5: Get a pair of SPD shoes.

  55. #55
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ravewoofer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    391
    Quote Originally Posted by Ltdan12a View Post
    I've attended spin classes with a few different instructors, and this is what I've taken away from them:

    1: The instructor really sets the tone of the class. Find one who's class fits what your looking for. I wasn't interested in any of the free weights or off the bike stuff, but liked the "core" workouts that can be included.

    2: Don't let the ladies discourage you. Every class I've done, the ratio of women to men has been about 10-1.. Once they realize you're there for the workout, and not to look at their asses, it gets a lot more welcoming.

    3: You get out what you put in. most people in a spin class come out of it "glistening", dabbing a towel on their forehead. I usually have a small lake of sweat on the floor under me, and look like I spent a week in the Hanoi Hilton getting interrogated. Turn the resistance up, get that heartrate up, and punish yourself.

    4: Remember your settings- Once you have the bike set up like you want, record/memorize where everything is!!

    5: Get a pair of SPD shoes.
    All of this!! And because of spin I ride at over 90% max heart rate for 2+ hours on every ride in the woods.

    For me, that would not be possible without spinning.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  56. #56
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    2,280
    I signed up for a spin/yoga class through my job. Its cheap ($50 for 8 classes) and why the hell not? I've been having some stiff back issues lately and weather has been nasty and keeping me off the bike. I figure just the fitness aspect will make it worth it.

    Each class is spinning for 45 min then yoga for 15 min. I got nothing to loose - even I'm not into it I'll stick it out for 8 classes and get some exercise.
    Vermonter - bikes, beers and skis.

  57. #57
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Crankout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2,755
    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    I donít get spin classes for people that own actual bicycles.

    For the amount of money youíll spend on spin classes three days a week over the winter, you could buy a power-measuring trainer. You could then race Zwift or do TrainerRoad workouts in the comfort of your own house.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Classes are part of my gym membership in my situation. I enjoy the motivation of the crowd and some instructors, and some of the music. I used to ride my trainer but hated being holed up in the basement alone.
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

Similar Threads

  1. what do you guys think of spin classes?
    By shugarbear in forum XC Racing and Training
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 11-18-2012, 06:15 PM
  2. Spin classes in Scottsdale
    By _azmtbr_ in forum Arizona
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 10-06-2012, 07:37 AM
  3. Spin Spin Spin
    By full_circle in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 06-20-2008, 11:47 AM
  4. Spin Classes??? Worth a try?? Waste of time??
    By XCBob in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 12-07-2005, 12:09 PM
  5. dudes at spin classes
    By garboui in forum Riding Passion and Stories
    Replies: 41
    Last Post: 12-09-2004, 02:39 PM

Members who have read this thread: 241

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2018 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.