Smart Bike Trainer or New Bike?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: HappyOne's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    2

    Smart Bike Trainer or New Bike?

    Hi, Debating on whether or not to keep an old Diamondback Sorrento and modify it to work with a new smart bike trainer. Lots of research, and still no closer to slapping the barrel. Not savvy on cassettes, flywheels, hubs, adapters, etc., so the old Sorrento may not even be compatible without me earning a degree in mechanics. I can either buy a Wahoo KICKR Core or Saris H3 on sale and a new compatible bike (with a reasonable price tag to off-set the crazy cost of the trainer), or just take the Sorrento in for its 15th tune-up, and drag it out once in a while. I really like the capability of the new direct-drive units. Fitness goals are mostly leisure, a runner not a cyclists. I am intrigued about the idea of creating my own indoor 24/7, safe, cycling oasis - with a real bike. Price point; no more than 1,500 for the new fitness adventure.

  2. #2
    WillWorkForTrail
    Reputation: Cotharyus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    4,864
    The real question, in my mind, is have you ever used a trainer of any kind before? Or a stationary bike? Some people can do it, and some people canít. I can take a bike out and ride it anywhere. No amount of wizardry can convince my mind to stay on a stationary bike or trainer. I like riding bikes, but there is a huge disconnect to a trainer. A basic trainer with music, TV, movies, netflix, etc - doesnít work for me. I canít do it. Enhancements to allow use with things like zwift - also net nothing in terms of my ability to stay on the bike when itís tied to a trainer. It just doesnít work for me. So for me, the answer to your question will always be something to do with a bike. But Iíve explained why that is - the purpose being to save you some pain if you havenít tried a trainer. Maybe try it and see how it works. Otherwise, maybe the tuneup and invest in the clothing youíd need to be able to ride that bike somewhere near you year around.

  3. #3
    well mannered lout
    Reputation: MOJO K's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,446
    Quote Originally Posted by HappyOne View Post
    Hi, Debating on whether or not to keep an old Diamondback Sorrento and modify it to work with a new smart bike trainer. Lots of research, and still no closer to slapping the barrel. Not savvy on cassettes, flywheels, hubs, adapters, etc., so the old Sorrento may not even be compatible without me earning a degree in mechanics. I can either buy a Wahoo KICKR Core or Saris H3 on sale and a new compatible bike (with a reasonable price tag to off-set the crazy cost of the trainer), or just take the Sorrento in for its 15th tune-up, and drag it out once in a while. I really like the capability of the new direct-drive units. Fitness goals are mostly leisure, a runner not a cyclists. I am intrigued about the idea of creating my own indoor 24/7, safe, cycling oasis - with a real bike. Price point; no more than 1,500 for the new fitness adventure.
    If it's me, I go with wool socks and a fat bike. For so many of us here it's less about fitness and more about getting outside.

    If you can find satisfaction running on a treadmill, indoor cycling might be your thing too. If you hate the treadmill you'll hate the indoor bike too. Also, remember, you can hang more shirts on a treadmill than you can on the bike.
    Well my days of not taking you seriously are certainly coming to a middle.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    8,749
    Your bike is compatible with any direct drive smart trainer. Any old clunky bike will work fine. Smart trainers are great for doing structured workouts and training plans with quantified results. With smart trainers, you get the most fitness benefit in the least amount of time, and of course, it's more likely you'll train in conditions you might not ride in. It is damn tedious. There are many training apps/sites, and Zwift, for example, tries to reduce the tedium by "gamifying" it. Anything that reduces the tedium is worthwhile. Another aspect is that pedaling on an unmoving bike can be a pain in the butt and elsewhere, very literally. Various systems are out there to let the bike rock side to side, and even move in all directions. There are also many plans on line to home-brew setups like these.

    I have a Saris Hammer and use it to due a structured training plan in late winter/early spring to gain fitness for when the riding season starts. I put it away most of the year.
    What, me worry?

  5. #5
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    28,798
    Quote Originally Posted by Cotharyus View Post
    The real question, in my mind, is have you ever used a trainer of any kind before? Or a stationary bike? Some people can do it, and some people canít. I can take a bike out and ride it anywhere. No amount of wizardry can convince my mind to stay on a stationary bike or trainer. I like riding bikes, but there is a huge disconnect to a trainer. A basic trainer with music, TV, movies, netflix, etc - doesnít work for me. I canít do it. Enhancements to allow use with things like zwift - also net nothing in terms of my ability to stay on the bike when itís tied to a trainer. It just doesnít work for me. So for me, the answer to your question will always be something to do with a bike. But Iíve explained why that is - the purpose being to save you some pain if you havenít tried a trainer. Maybe try it and see how it works. Otherwise, maybe the tuneup and invest in the clothing youíd need to be able to ride that bike somewhere near you year around.
    I've thought about a smart trainer for structured workouts for a long time and I keep coming back to this. I HATE riding trainers by myself. I've set up a dumb trainer on Zwift. I've tried watching movies with the dumb trainer. I hate it. The only thing that remotely worked was using a smart trainer in a studio setting with other people and a leader who made the atmosphere fun (and not an hour of masochism). Spin classes are awful because of the frequently masochist instructors and the frequently terrible music. Tried those, too. So buying the equipment for myself isn't what works for me. What does would be paying for a membership to some sort of studio that runs an operation like I'm looking for. And IME, that sort of thing isn't available everywhere.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    264
    i got a smart trainer and my workouts are between 20 and 30 minutes. I sometimes use it as a primer preride or postride torture. I use it for HIIT and quit no base miles or recoveries

  7. #7
    Rod
    Rod is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Rod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    5,769
    As Lone Ranger said, your current bike will work. There are adapters so any modern bike that I am familiar with will work with a Kickr. You will just need a cassette with same number of gears as your current bike. You may need to place a spacer behind the cassette before you put it on the kickr.

    With that said, I like my smart trainer. My wife does too. As others have said, I hated indoor training. I tried trainers and rollers with music, netflix, race footage, etc. Anyways, I enjoy the group rides the most on Zwift. Last Thursday, I did a 5 lap ride with the first 4 laps being calm, cool, and collected, but the last lap was extremely fast with everyone racing to the finish. You can find any event that you want to do. Long slow rides, races, 30 minute rides, dad rides, premade workouts, or ride with pros.

    Edit: Just so we are clear, I much prefer riding outside. There's no comparison, but if you don't have a safe place and want an indoor cycling oasis this is the way to go.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    8,749
    Yeah. Some people like Zwifting. Not me. I ride the trainer solely to build fitness quickly and time efficiently. I basically only do structured training in ERG mode on the trainer following a training plan on Trainerroad or Zwift... Training sessions are typically 1-1.5 hrs, 3-5 times per week.
    What, me worry?

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    906
    If you aren't really into cycling but like the training for fitness I think the smart trainer would be best. There a ton of really good training apps to help you keep a focused workout plan and a few others that are more for entertainment but also help you with workouts like Zwift.

    Most people who like cycling only use indoor training as a last resort or for structured training. It's not much fun compared to actually being out riding.

  10. #10
    jcd's best friend
    Reputation: Battery's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    2,627
    I rode on my trainer for months and did 800+ miles on it. I sold it the following season because I couldn't mentally handle riding on it. I couldn't accept the fact that I was riding stationary and going absolutely nowhere. Plus riding on Zwift for an hour felt like an eternity.

    I decided to just stick with riding outside even if it's cold and rainy.
    Cannondale Synapse Neo | Salsa Timberjack

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: HappyOne's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    2
    Thanks to all for the very informative perspectives. I waited a week to make a decision, and I am going to go with:
    - Putting the money back in my pocket.
    - Tuning up the old bike for outdoors. I cannot mentally force myself to ride a stationary bike, treadmill, or the like. Even on vacation (like we use to do back in the day...) Iím the odd guest running laps round and round the hotel or parking lot.
    - Although the Ďnew apps and fancy wizardryí do seem inviting, Iíll keep the indoor oasis simple, but functional, when needed.
    At some point, I will find a safe place to ride, with not too many distracted drivers, as I really do need to start transitioning from running too much and incorporating cycling into my regimen. Just need my local parks to fully open back up, getting back on the water will help mix it up. Might even upgrade the bike later this summer to something more 2020ish.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    31
    Smart trainer was a game changer for me. Iím on it 2-3 times a week for 1-1.5 hr focused workouts with the TrainerRoad App. However, Iím consistent with it and my inconsistent outdoor rides are much more fun because Iím already fit (From indoor training). I can just play around goofing off or ride hard, but Iím riding for fun, not worried about getting a workout in.

Similar Threads

  1. Full suspension bike on a smart trainer
    By vkixc in forum Bike and Frame discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 12-20-2019, 04:18 PM
  2. New to Smart Trainer, Q's on Drivetrain
    By fomac in forum XC Racing and Training
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 06-11-2019, 03:10 PM
  3. Fat bike on smart trainer?
    By Jefflinde in forum Fat bikes
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 11-06-2018, 03:28 PM
  4. Get rid of road bike power meter since smart trainer has one?
    By westin in forum XC Racing and Training
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-28-2017, 08:31 AM
  5. Zwift / Smart Trainer - Does the Bike Matter?
    By ekraft in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 04-24-2017, 12:54 AM

Members who have read this thread: 41

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.