should i take my bike apart and put it back together?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    should i take my bike apart and put it back together?

    this winter when i can't ride??? what's the worst that can happen?

    i'm a newb....or close to it..

  2. #2
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    If it ain't broke don't fix it!!!

    If you are a noob I would not recommend it.

    Now if it is a cheap bike and you want to get familiar with working on a bike go ahead, it's good way to learn.

  3. #3
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    Sure if you have the time and feel like it, just be sure to have or be wary of all the tools you may need.

    He, he he, he,.................................. (I'd love to be a fly on the wall for this one.)
    If you're not falling, then you're not riding fast enough!
    Specialized Epic Expert Evo
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  4. #4

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    If you want to learn how things on the bike are put together, go for it, but take a lot of care and make sure you know what you do to it. There's plenty of good resources out there to tell you what you're doing and what tools you'd need, such as parktool and sheldon brown.

  5. #5
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    i mean if worse comes to worse i can just put it in a bag and take it to the LBS right haha

  6. #6

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    Assuming you put no excessive force into any of the parts, you could do that. If however you go overboard, and damage something, you'll have to buy replacements.

  7. #7
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    Do it a part at a time. Try a front hub or a seat post clamp. A good way to keep your bike in condition is to do a more complete overhaul/clean etc on one part at a time and work through everything over time. Read up on a part you intend to work on and make sure you have the right tools and fluids (grease, loctite etc) before you start.
    Oh sh!+ just force upgraded to cat1. Now what?
    Best thing about an ultra marathon? I just get to ride my bike for X hours!

  8. #8
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    go for it, its not rocket science.

    www.parktool.com

  9. #9
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    For some reason, I can never figure out how to put my headset on correctly. It;s usually cause I'll forget a spacer or something. But I usually have to go back to the lbs and have them fix it anyway. It's not too difficult, but don't underestimate it at all. Necessary tools are a must. So is a workstand.

  10. #10
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    Do it.
    You will learn muchissimo.
    You only risk a bit of pride/$$ to the shop.

    For tuning drivetrain, a bike stand is a must. A couple of things require specific tools.

    A good book like ZEN is a must too

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by freezen1979
    this winter when i can't ride??? what's the worst that can happen?
    The very worst? You (unknowingly) put your bike back together in such a way that it's unsafe to ride. When you do ride it again, you get severely hurt or worse...

    You may also break parts or strip threads.

    That said, I think it's beneficial to know how everything on your bike works and how to take it apart and put it back together. On the trail, such knowledge can save you from a long walk home. Once you get good at it, your bike will be better maintained than if you took it to your LBS on a regular basis. (You have the luxury of being able to spend arbitrarily large amounts of time tweaking an adjustment or cleaning something so that it's just right. Your LBS can't afford to do this.)

    So, by all means, go for it. Get the proper tools (including suitable torque wrenches) and bike repair literature and have at it. As others here have noted, you'll be better off not taking everything apart all at once and then reassembling. Instead, focus on one area at a time. E.g. make it one afternoon's project to take the stem off the steerer tube and then remove the fork. This will give you access to the headset bearings which will probably need cleaning anyway. Once you've accomplished this a few times, having the fork off the bike will allow you to (more easily) do a damping oil change on the fork.

    You can make similar projects out of taking the hubs apart, taking the bottom bracket and cranks off, etc. In each case, take time to thoroughly clean and regrease as needed.

  12. #12
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    If you have a bit of common sense, why not? I see this scenario all the time on forums:

    Q - "My tires need 2 PSI, What to do now?"
    A - "Take it to the LBS, stat!"

    They're bicycles, not very difficult. I don't think I'd tear open my fork until I did a bit of research, but my word. I've read posts of people taking their bikes to the shop to have the tires changed. I'm not claiming to be Mr. Bike or anything, but some people prefer to DIY.

    Seriously, If you get into a bind, you should be able to find the info online such as this forum.

  13. #13

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    DO IT!

    Get yourself new shifter & brake cables, and go to town, Man!

  14. #14
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    Not only should you do it once, but you should break it down and build it up many times, so that it becomes second nature. That said, do your research and get your tools. a work stand is a must. Avoid breaking into the suspension, well generally don't take apart components. Take them off, just not apart. And leave the headset in place. There is no real reason to remove the cups.

    Make sure you have lots of room and plenty of time. Make sure to put all hardware and components in seperate freezer bags to keep them from getting misplaced. Do not work on the bike for more than an hour or so at a time. If you get frustrated with something, put it down, sleep on it, do more research and go back to it. Also, take detailed pics of the bike before you break it down, so you have a reference when you build it back up.

    If you break it down and build it back a number of times, you will develop a very spiritual bond with your bike and be intimately familiar with it.

    If you are worried that you may have done something wrong, take it to the LBS and have them check it over, but really as long as you stay out of the suspension, a bike is a very simple piece of machinery with only a few moving parts and a handful of nuts and bolts.

    You can do it, just take your time and keep your head.

  15. #15
    i am, therefore, i ride
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    Go for it and you will learn a lot by doing so !!!!!
    "Life is good..... enjoy it !!!!!"

  16. #16

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    Um...why? I see no reason to take it all apart and put it back together again unless you really want to learn or are just bored.

  17. #17
    Your bike is incorrigible
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    GET TOOLS!!!!

    Then go for it. I think you'd be surprised at just how many tools you need to completely break down your bike. AlliKat was on the money: do small things first. The front hub is a decent place to start. Or take the fork out and clean the headset. Take your pedals off, clean and regrease them.

  18. #18
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    really want to learn.
    yeeeeesssss

    or are just bored
    winter is coming.....

  19. #19
    jrm
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    "theres allways parts left over"

    Quote Originally Posted by freezen1979
    this winter when i can't ride??? what's the worst that can happen?

    i'm a newb....or close to it..

    i dont know why but there allways are..

  20. #20
    Bike Breaker.
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    I have learnt over the years from the Park Tools Website and that gut instinct of "Not sure if i should do this", oh and a Quality torque wrench might help.

  21. #21

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    I would do it, just take notes on the more complex parts to make sure you put it back together properly... But, it's a great way to learn about how components work.

  22. #22
    the catalan connection
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    Highly recomended!Wrenching is beautiful.
    It can be a bit expensive habit though, as you´ll probably find yourself "forced" to buy tools each time you face a special nut, spline, groove...And bikes have plenty.
    But a good set of hex wrenches will get you fairly deep.

    A must have tool for this forum is a digital camera , so you can show people here what´s going on whenever can´t figure it out by yourself.
    "Blessed is the man who, having nothing to say, abstains from giving us wordly evidence of the fact." George Elliot

  23. #23
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    i just built my first bike and it wasnt that hard - already had most of the tools, just needed a couple specific ones.

    if you're going to do this, I would highly recommend scouring the forums, the web, and park tool's site for all the walk throughs and read, read, read before doing anything.

    best to take pictures as you go too - might remind you were something went when you are putting it back together.

    frankly, it probably would be a good thing - take everything apart, re-pack bearings with fresh grease, torque everything back together to spec and tune it up - then when the nice weather hits you can just jump on and ride.

  24. #24
    Bicyclist
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    So, how did it go?
    Did you completely overhaul your bicycle?

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