Seat Position Move Forward or Tilt- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Seat Position Move Forward or Tilt

    I have a Fabric Scoop Radius. Having had saddles shaped like this before, I find that as I ride I am sliding forward very slightly. I also keep pushing myself back to the original position. If I tilt the nose upward, it keeps me in that position by shape of the well. However I am thinking maybe I am being pulled forward by my body wanting to be more forward so maybe I need to move the saddle forward instead. Back when I had an SQlab 611, they said people tended to move that saddle forward to keep the sit bones in the proper place.

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  2. #2
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    Probably best to start with your preference as it may require a tilt adjustment anyway if you move it forward.

    I feel that you'll know what is right when you sit on it before us yahoo's tell you what is best for ya.

  3. #3
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    Trial and error is the only way to do this. Take measurements and experiment. I find that I need to get the saddle level using the front and rear tips of the saddle for reference, then tip the nose up just a tiny bit. You probably want your body to be cradled "in" the saddle, not perched on top of it.

  4. #4
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    FWIW: I've always preferred my saddles to be angled upward a few degrees...not much, just the nose slightly higher than level. It's not that uncommon to do.
    Do the math.

  5. #5
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    Just another factor for you to consider. But a good rule is if your seat is too high you will find yourself sliding forward on it. Maybe try lowering it just a bit.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  6. #6
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    We have a bit to play with. A saddle too forward or backward will hurt your knees.
    Find a way with happy knees(painfree). If you cannot try an other saddle.
    I had lots of saddles and lots of bikes and flat is the rule, you might be an exception.
    Any wrist or elbow pain?. A good position is stable there is no need to fight it.
    It is normal to instinctively vary a bit, there is no reason ti fix yourself in 1 position for 5 hours but the fact you are asking means there is something to resolve. Listen to your body, we can only make suggestions.

  7. #7
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    I have the same saddle on all of my bikes. I have it flat and forward and back position is dependent on the bike. I noticed that if I have the nose down I slide forward a little. Works nice for climbing but not great everywhere else. Slight nose up, I slide back which isn't that great either. Flat works best for me. Try flat and see if it works well. I noticed that with this saddle, even slight nose up or down makes a noticeable difference in your seated position and comfort.
    I no longer like to party. But I like the idea of it.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    FWIW: I've always preferred my saddles to be angled upward a few degrees...not much, just the nose slightly higher than level. It's not that uncommon to do.
    ^ this. You may need to lower your seatpost slightly to compensate.

    Please ignore any comments from anyone who asks if your elbows hurt when the subject at hand is saddle position/angle. The two are not related in any way. WTF??
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  9. #9
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    A couple things I've concluded over the years FWIW (for me)

    Saddle to high and you start pulling yourself to the nose..

    Saddle to low and you feel like you're getting back on the tail and pushed into the bars.

    Nose too low and you put more weight on hands and don't use enough hams.

    Nose too high and you try to pull yourself forward via hams/arms.

    YMMV

  10. #10
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    Slide the saddle forward. I'd give that a try.

  11. #11
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    Much good advice here.

    Were it me, I'd try one thing at a time provided your reach feels right - slight tilt at nose of saddle a few degrees if it's currently level, then test ride on some topo variety and various levels of adventure.

    Same for seat height -

    Seat rails forward/aft may be just fine if you have ride comfort and are happy with your front center body postion on the frame, maybe leave that for last if needed. Little changes one a time and trial rides worked for me.

    My saddle is a bit slippery so I know it has to be 'just right'. Too easy for my body to shift otherwise.
    bachman must spread some Reputation around before giving it to himself again.


  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    FWIW: I've always preferred my saddles to be angled upward a few degrees...not much, just the nose slightly higher than level. It's not that uncommon to do.
    x3. I used to always ride with the nose down a tiny bit so as to not risk damage to the nether regions. Nope. No good. Raising the nose has always instantly solved any issues of sliding forward and having too much weight on my hands.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    FWIW: I've always preferred my saddles to be angled upward a few degrees...not much, just the nose slightly higher than level. It's not that uncommon to do.
    Same here.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    ^ this. You may need to lower your seatpost slightly to compensate.

    Please ignore any comments from anyone who asks if your elbows hurt when the subject at hand is saddle position/angle. The two are not related in any way. WTF??
    They are related as the saddle too far front puts too much weight on your arms to hold up.
    Stand in front of a mirror and lean forward. You will see that your body pushes the butt back to balance out the upper body forward.
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