Saddles and flexibility- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Saddles and flexibility

    I keep seeing various ads in mags and such about getting the right saddle based on flexibility.
    Has anyone seen an article/chart/info with this kind of info?
    I know it's not the end all be all, but it might give me some good info...
    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    What direction are you heading....

    It seems saddles with a flexy shell are comfy the first hour. On longer rides, hot spots develop. I tend to get lazy on a flexy saddle as well, putting more weight on soft tissue. Rather than on sit bones.

    A firmer shell saddle does seam firm. Especially when you first start riding it. On longer rides they actually tend to be more comfy. I tend to sit more on my sit bones, where your suppost to. On a firmer saddle.

    Also, getting the correct width saddle to fit your sit bones is paramount.

    If your ride a HT and looking for something to take the edge off. Maybe consider a suspension, TI or carbon post. You could also run higher volume tires to help. Running tubes can help slightly as well.

    Perhaps you could share more detail in what goal you are trying to achieve....

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mojo Troll View Post
    It seems saddles with a flexy shell are comfy the first hour. On longer rides, hot spots develop. I tend to get lazy on a flexy saddle as well, putting more weight on soft tissue. Rather than on sit bones.

    A firmer shell saddle does seam firm. Especially when you first start riding it. On longer rides they actually tend to be more comfy. I tend to sit more on my sit bones, where your suppost to. On a firmer saddle.

    Also, getting the correct width saddle to fit your sit bones is paramount.

    If your ride a HT and looking for something to take the edge off. Maybe consider a suspension, TI or carbon post. You could also run higher volume tires to help. Running tubes can help slightly as well.

    Perhaps you could share more detail in what goal you are trying to achieve....
    Hey Toll,
    Actually I'm talking about your body's flexibility verses the flex of the saddle and it's comfort. I know a few companies have promoted "Our saddle X is better for you if you can touch your toes" type of products. Just curious if there is anything out there.
    Thanks

  4. #4
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    I gotcha now. Sounds like you've been visiting the Fizik site latly.

    Every saddle maker has thier own way of researching, engineering, marketing thier product.

    Best advice I can give is. Demo as many saddles as possible. Fizik, WTB and Specialized all make great saddles. Visit a few shops and see if they have demo models you can try.

    Asking for saddle advice in a form is like buying shoes online, without trying them. Every manufactures size runs different. Just as no two human bodies are alike.

    Only your A$$ knows what it likes.

  5. #5
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    Fizik! That the one I was thinking of... thanks!

  6. #6
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    I'm not buying the Fizik philosophy on flexibility and saddle type. This is because I am fairly flexible, yet I'm super comfy on what Fizik prescribes for the least flexible body type. Maybe I'm just a freakish exception, but I'm not convinced flexibility alone can dictate saddle type (among other things, just because you're flexible doesn't mean you utilize your flexibility in your riding position).

    Things that look like they'd be comfortable often are not, and vice versa when it comes to saddles.

    Those who have had their sit bones measured and then chosen a sadlle based on that dimension seem to have good luck.

    Anyone who rides with their sadlle too high, even by just a few mm, will likely have difficulty finding a comfy saddle. Rocking hips = sore rump. Any problem with bike fit could cause an otherwise appropriate sadlle to feel uncomfortable, and this includes crank arm length, stem angle/length, top tube length, etc.

    Some saddle manufacturers have programs that allow you to try different saddles, usually at no cost if you end up buying one of their saddles. People have had good luck with these programs, but they could pose a challenge to any germophobes.

    Good luck,
    Pete
    I can barely get my mouth around it.

  7. #7
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    I'm not entirely convinced their logic is proven either. I'm not flexible, but I like the Arione. They don't seem to take into account the shape of a person's rear end either. You can buy into their info or not, but I still prefer the hands-on approach. In my opinion, you're best off trying to find your first saddle by shopping with a company with a good return policy.
    We sell quality bike headlights and flashlights.
    www.LightJunction.com

  8. #8
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    Yep, saddles are totally a personal preference item. Flex, softness, your condition, riding style and size, and your bikes tires and suspension, as well as terain all play a role. I personaly am not picky about saddles and only find very wide, or very soft uncomfortable on longer rides. i don't think it's the amount of flex as mch as the amount of softness/padding that start to bother on longer rides, because my brooks saddle is very flexy, no padding, and the most comfy saddle i ever used, long or short haul.
    Round and round we go

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