Road Bike to Commuter- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    a.k.a. MTBMaven
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    Road Bike to Commuter

    Got a friend who has a road bike, with 1" wheels, who wants to start commuting with his road bike. His bike is uncomfortable but he is broke due to buying a new home in LA. His commute is about 10 miles.

    I suggested getting a larger diameter tire and a stem with a positive rise rather than negative. Down the road (no pun intended) he could look at getting a flat bar if needed.

    Any suggestions? Any suggestions for larger diameter tires for skinny road tires?

    I don't know that much about road bikes, I only mountain bike.

  2. #2
    ballbuster
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnfiend
    Got a friend who has a road bike, with 1" wheels, who wants to start commuting with his road bike. His bike is uncomfortable but he is broke due to buying a new home in LA. His commute is about 10 miles.

    I suggested getting a larger diameter tire and a stem with a positive rise rather than negative. Down the road (no pun intended) he could look at getting a flat bar if needed.

    Any suggestions? Any suggestions for larger diameter tires for skinny road tires?

    I don't know that much about road bikes, I only mountain bike.
    Cyclocross tires are usually in the 35c range. Regular roadie tires are around 20-25c.

    It also depends on how big a tire you can fit in the frame, fork and around the brakes. I have a Giant TCR compact frame with 25c tires, and there is not another mm of room between the rear tire and seat tube. Sometimes the rear tire picks up tiny pebbles and make a pretty nasty noise as it grinds through the seat tube. You may be able to get a larger tire in there, but you'll prolly have to deflate them to get them past the brake calipers.

    You prolly want a tire with a nice smooth center ridge. Knobby treaded tires are slow on pavement.

  3. #3

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    What's wrong with a racer for commuting?

    Why change anything?

    Road and MTB wheels normally have different diameters, so tires will not be interchangable. Cross-country tires are about the only option.

    By the way, I think that a flat bar would need different brake and gear levers (depending on the setup), so it probably won't be a cheap change.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnfiend
    Got a friend who has a road bike, with 1" wheels, who wants to start commuting with his road bike. His bike is uncomfortable but he is broke due to buying a new home in LA. His commute is about 10 miles.

    I suggested getting a larger diameter tire and a stem with a positive rise rather than negative. Down the road (no pun intended) he could look at getting a flat bar if needed.

    Any suggestions? Any suggestions for larger diameter tires for skinny road tires?

    I don't know that much about road bikes, I only mountain bike.
    Why is the bike uncomfortable specifically? Different sized tires and/or stem may not necessarily cure this. If the bike has never been comfortable maybe he should consider trading it for a different bike that is a better fit and more suitable for commuting.

  5. #5
    jrm
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    commuter

    Quote Originally Posted by mtnfiend
    Got a friend who has a road bike, with 1" wheels, who wants to start commuting with his road bike. His bike is uncomfortable but he is broke due to buying a new home in LA. His commute is about 10 miles.

    I suggested getting a larger diameter tire and a stem with a positive rise rather than negative. Down the road (no pun intended) he could look at getting a flat bar if needed.

    Any suggestions? Any suggestions for larger diameter tires for skinny road tires?

    I don't know that much about road bikes, I only mountain bike.
    I have a 0 degree rise stem, pretty wide bar 44cm and run panaracer tserv for messenger 25c's on my road bike/commuter. Its comfortable, and fast....

  6. #6
    a.k.a. MTBMaven
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    He told me he is too hunched over. I figured that the wider tire would give a more comfortable ride and possibly lessen damage to the rims due to crappy road conditions. I also to thought a 0 rise or possitive rise stem would raise the bars up a bit, producing a more comfortable riding position.

  7. #7
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    He is probably limited to around a 25mm tire. He should get some that are heavy duty with some kind of puncture resistance. They will be heavier, but he will flat less.

    Otherwise, a higher and maybe shorter stem and. He could also maybe raise the handlebars a little bit.

    Make sure the seat is not too far back, maybe even get a seatpost with no set back to bring him closer to the bars, unless it puts him too far forward on the pedals.

    Maybe invest in a comfier saddle. I don't mean one of the gel monsters, just something that works better for his butt.

    He also might consider a carbon seatpost or a suspension seatpost. Specialized sells some of their sport level road bikes with a suspension post, not like the thudbuster, but more like a little telescoping system, though a thudbuster could work too.

    A carbon fork would also eat up some of the road vibration, but that is starting to get a little more pricey. At the very least, make sure he has a steel fork, not an aluminum one. And maybe invest in some good gel bar tape.

  8. #8
    jrm
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    A 0 degree stem..

    Quote Originally Posted by mtnfiend
    He told me he is too hunched over. I figured that the wider tire would give a more comfortable ride and possibly lessen damage to the rims due to crappy road conditions. I also to thought a 0 rise or possitive rise stem would raise the bars up a bit, producing a more comfortable riding position.
    and maybe repositioning the brake hoods further up on the bar will allow a more upright position.

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