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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fattyrider38 View Post
    Nice!
    What bars are those? Canít quite make out the logo on my small screen cell phone.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedalon2018 View Post
    . Trek will not send you a Progect One bike without them cutting the steering tube.
    Yeah, deal breaker for me, too. When I buy a bike, I want the chance to spend the time to get the fit dialed.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I'm not sure exactly what sort of bike you are wanting. Your emphasis on light weight is pointing to an xc bike, but it sounds like you're wanting the geo from a rowdier bike, which is going to encourage the builder to over-build it to make sure it doesn't spectacularly fail.

    I don't think you're going to be able to get exactly what it sounds like you're after.
    I think you are right, and at least for me, that's the problem...(although the unobtainium Unno Aora seems like one exception).

    I think lots of bikes are overbuilt...which I understand in many ways...but take the SC Highball...around 1200g frame with no rider weight limit and lifetime warranty. Seems like you should be able to come close in more rowdy geo bike and not have it be too fragile.
    Riding: '91 Carbon Epic Stumpjumper w/1" Slicks and a Rack on the Back

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by IPA Rider View Post
    I think you are right, and at least for me, that's the problem...(although the unobtainium Unno Aora seems like one exception).

    I think lots of bikes are overbuilt...which I understand in many ways...but take the SC Highball...around 1200g frame with no rider weight limit and lifetime warranty. Seems like you should be able to come close in more rowdy geo bike and not have it be too fragile.
    It comes down to intended use, though. Change the geo on that highball frame and it won't be able to have that lack of weight limit and lifetime warranty at that weight.

    Build it rowdier, and people will ride it rowdier, which requires the mfr to build it heavier.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Nice!
    What bars are those? Canít quite make out the logo on my small screen cell phone.
    Those are Oddity Cycles bars. Made right here in Fort Collins. Get with Burnsey to get yours.

  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by hippymtnbkr View Post
    I think if I had a little more money, I would go for a Moots YBB. Probably the closest I would get to FS.
    If you keep your eyes open for a used YBB you can get a pretty good deal. Often they have little actual trail use on them when you buy them from the original owner. This is how I picked up both of my YBBs. For long trail days and endurance races I like to have a little more squish than my hardtails provide. In the 14 years I've been riding YBB I have bought, ridden, and sold several FS bikes, always opting instead to keep the soft tail.

    Reason Why High End Hard Tails Still Exist??-0521180930a_burst01.jpg

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Nope. Chaz's red Jamis has the first Hollowtech II XT cranks

    Attachment 1224652
    Oooh! That's what I had on my Titus. I loved those cranks!

    I was amazed at the difference in stiffness from the older cranks.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    Cost per mile, fun hardtails pay for themselves. You're riding a compromised bike so you don't need to waste time with the latest standards. Just get a good frame and a tip-top fork from the last 10 years and don't think about it. 9/10sp xt is basically free and works great.


    Ride the full suspension money trap when it's warranted.
    Ha, my FS bike does eat up a fair amount of money, but I really love it.

    I don't know how a 9/10 speed XT is free? I do agree that XT works great though. It's my first choice for drivetrain.

    Pretty much nothing from my old VooDoo would be compatible with a newer frame. For my riding area, a beefy fork and slack geometry would be the ticket for another hardtail.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curveball View Post
    For my riding area, a beefy fork and slack geometry would be the ticket for another hardtail.
    mmmmm, I just bought a MRP Ribbon for my Pedalhead frame.

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    mmmmm, I just bought a MRP Ribbon for my Pedalhead frame.
    Niiiice!

    I love my Ribbon.

    And a Pedalhead would be ever so sweet. I can't wait to see your finished bike.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  11. #111
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    https://reviews.mtbr.com/chris-akrig...with-a-hardtai
    If you develop your skill . . . .Chris Akrigg put a Fox 36 on a Mongoose and can ride anything.

  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    https://reviews.mtbr.com/chris-akrig...with-a-hardtai
    If you develop your skill . . . .Chris Akrigg put a Fox 36 on a Mongoose and can ride anything.
    Oh, I guess you missed post #68.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    Chris Akrigg can ride anything.
    fify

  14. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curveball View Post
    Oh, I guess you missed post #68.
    yes missed a few.

  15. #115
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    Yes Oddity makes some really nice bars, and bikes as well, love those curves! These bars were spendy, but hands down added the most fun factor to my bikes cockpit besides the dropper, I used to ride Jones H bars but I found with a suspension fork 45 degrees is just way to much sweep, I got these custom with 15 degrees of sweep 800mm wide and I just love them.
    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Nice!
    What bars are those? Canít quite make out the logo on my small screen cell phone.

  16. #116
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    To me is about finding the right tool for the job. Hardtails are for climbing fast and smooth trails. Full suspension helps when the trail is rough...I love hardtails because of the simplicity and because they are light. You can also get a better bike for your money. I just got a top of the line carbon hardtail for under 3 grand. It is difficult to get a good FS rig for that price.
    I have both hardtails and FS bikes, and I use them depending on the kind of trail/ride that I'm doing on that particular day. Now, if I could only have one bike, I would probably go with FS since it allows you to enjoy the ride more while riding technical and rocky terrain. But again, it is just a matter of preference. Go and ride whatever makes you happy...

  17. #117
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    I love my hardtail because I ride up to 16 miles of bike path or gravel to get to the trailhead. The 3" tires are more than enough cushion for our local primarily river bottom and floodplain trails. When the trails get rougher/more extreme its time to break out the full suspension. That being said the hardtail racks up way more miles than the FS and the extra spend on components and details is worth it.

    Reason Why High End Hard Tails Still Exist??-img_20171126_161255074-copy.jpg

    Reason Why High End Hard Tails Still Exist??-img_20181019_133905963_hdr_copy.jpg

  18. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    It comes down to intended use, though. Change the geo on that highball frame and it won't be able to have that lack of weight limit and lifetime warranty at that weight.

    Build it rowdier, and people will ride it rowdier, which requires the mfr to build it heavier.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk
    In a few years, you'll be proven wrong. XC bikes will adopt more trail geometry.

    Modern XC frames aren't lacking in strength, the weak points are the wheels and fork.

  19. #119
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    That is a beautiful rigid bike
    Quote Originally Posted by ianick View Post
    I love my hardtail because I ride up to 16 miles of bike path or gravel to get to the trailhead. The 3" tires are more than enough cushion for our local primarily river bottom and floodplain trails. When the trails get rougher/more extreme its time to break out the full suspension. That being said the hardtail racks up way more miles than the FS and the extra spend on components and details is worth it.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Click image for larger version. 

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  20. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I'm not sure exactly what sort of bike you are wanting. Your emphasis on light weight is pointing to an xc bike, but it sounds like you're wanting the geo from a rowdier bike, which is going to encourage the builder to over-build it to make sure it doesn't spectacularly fail.

    I don't think you're going to be able to get exactly what it sounds like you're after.
    Quote Originally Posted by richde View Post
    In a few years, you'll be proven wrong. XC bikes will adopt more trail geometry.

    Modern XC frames aren't lacking in strength, the weak points are the wheels and fork.
    But those little lycra-clad XC racers never ride that hard ;-)
    Riding: '91 Carbon Epic Stumpjumper w/1" Slicks and a Rack on the Back

  21. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fattyrider38 View Post
    That is a beautiful rigid bike
    Thank you very much. Two years and 4000 miles later I still love it as much as the day I got it.

  22. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by IPA Rider View Post
    But those little lycra-clad XC racers never ride that hard ;-)
    Yep , they don't ride hard , they ride fast !
    "There is a big difference between kneeling down and bending over" -FZ

  23. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by fokof View Post
    Yep , they don't ride hard , they ride fast !
    There is actually something to be said for very skilled riders. Very skilled riders do ride fast and not hard. Look at some really good skilled guys and they can fly and float over stuff. Compare that to more normal riders who may "bash" through stuff. That flying/floating is fast, but not hard on the equipment. I would love to say I "float", but moving to a rigid fork on my HT I can feel how sloppy I am on certain bits of trail. I need to work on that.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  24. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    There is actually something to be said for very skilled riders. Very skilled riders do ride fast and not hard. Look at some really good skilled guys and they can fly and float over stuff. Compare that to more normal riders who may "bash" through stuff. That flying/floating is fast, but not hard on the equipment. I would love to say I "float", but moving to a rigid fork on my HT I can feel how sloppy I am on certain bits of trail. I need to work on that.
    After almost a full year on the rigid SS, I can now say I am considerably smoother over chunky/rocky/rooty terrain. So much more so that I actually sold my full suspension bike. I do want to get a new geared bike (with a suspension fork) for really big days (25+ miles with over 6K vert), but the rigid SS is super fun even on those rides.

  25. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by IPA Rider View Post
    But those little lycra-clad XC racers never ride that hard ;-)
    Lol
    You said little.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  26. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    There is actually something to be said for very skilled riders. Very skilled riders do ride fast and not hard. Look at some really good skilled guys and they can fly and float over stuff. Compare that to more normal riders who may "bash" through stuff. That flying/floating is fast, but not hard on the equipment.
    True. I know a few intermediate riders who have destroyed multiple rims riding the same stuff as the experienced guys who never kill rims.

  27. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curveball View Post
    A lot of this is context. In the following video, I have a very hard time accepting that trail would be at all enjoyable on a hardtail.



    But that's at one extreme of the trail spectrum. There are a lot of trail between that and super-smooth where a hardtail can be a heap of fun.
    That's almost as chunky as Goat Camp Trail in Arizona's White Mountains which I ride on a steel single speed sometimes.
    Ripping trails and tipping ales

  28. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fattyrider38 View Post
    Reason Why High End Hard Tails Still Exist??
    Because MTB tech is still stuck in the '50s and '60s.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  29. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by ALimon View Post
    I like hard tails. My ass doesnít. End of story.
    You're riding it wrong ;-P
    Quote Originally Posted by natas1321 View Post
    I personally prefer my hardtail over my fs bikes and would take a hardtail as my only bike if I could only have one. I just prefer the feedback and the feel my gives me over a fs bike.

    Sent from my HTC One M9 using Tapatalk
    Me too...

    If I had to chose between my 29er AM HT or my 650b Enduro rig, I'd choose my HT every day of the week & twice on Sundays ^^

    'Born to ride!'
    "Mountain biking: the under-rated and drug-free antidepressant"

  30. #130
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    They still exist because people buy them, not everyone wants a FS bike. The trails around me are great for hard tails and being decidedly old school a HT was perfect.

    Since I am not the least bit interested in entry level components and place a high value on aesthetics I bought a Marin Pine Mountain 2. I'm a fan of steel bikes and this one looks very good with the bent down and seat tube.

    Did replace the Nailed rear axle with a Robert Axle Project axle. While I can appreciate the engineering that went into the Nailed axle it really is overkill.


    Reason Why High End Hard Tails Still Exist??-fi8vijr.jpg
    Last edited by 351; 2 Weeks Ago at 02:04 PM.

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