Results 1 to 31 of 31
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,607

    Paint in Frame at Headset and Bottom Bracket

    As the heading indicates, my new frame has paint in the headset and (press-fit) bottom bracket. Is it necessary to remove the paint before install?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    152
    The answer is definitely maybe.

    Depends on thickness of paint and the tolerances of the parts. I've seen paint make a simple job a PITA. If the paint breaks away easily, not a problem. But, some paint is like rubber and can make it seem like the metal has galled as it binds things up.

  3. #3
    the discerning hooligan
    Reputation: MOJO K's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,144
    Most frames come with the bottom bracket and head tube machined (faced) after painting. Paint on the inside shouldnít be an issue.
    MERCY! MERCY! MERCY!

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,607
    Quote Originally Posted by MOJO K View Post
    Most frames come with the bottom bracket and head tube machined (faced) after painting. Paint on the inside shouldnít be an issue.
    Unfortunately, mine does have paint. It's powder coat. I don't really want to sand it, but maybe I will. Hoping I could ignore it.

  5. #5
    the discerning hooligan
    Reputation: MOJO K's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,144
    I donít own a headset press so I bring new builds to the shop for that. They always face the head tube before installing the cups.
    MERCY! MERCY! MERCY!

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JoePAz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    4,825
    all paint should be removed from pressfit or threaded surfaces. Paint will add thickness and interfere with the proper fit tolerances on these components. Do not sand it. Let the shop that is pressing in the parts know before hand to be sure they clean the area properly. Sand too much by hand and you will have poor fit due to oversizing the holes.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  7. #7
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    4,900
    My powdercoater has always masked off (or plugged?) those areas so that they don't get paint. He knows what he is doing.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

  8. #8
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    33,146
    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    My powdercoater has always masked off (or plugged?) those areas so that they don't get paint. He knows what he is doing.
    Itís amazing how so many in the industry have lost that eye for detail. Most mass produced frames tend to be released with flaws like what the OP has mentioned.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  9. #9
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    24,402
    "maybe?" lord, no. DEFINITELY face and ream out those pressfit interfaces! you're asking for trouble if you don't!

  10. #10
    Never trust a fart
    Reputation: frdfandc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    4,213
    Yes it's necessary and yes have your local shop do it. They should have the right tools. If you do it yourself, you run the risk of taking too much material off and then your press fit stuff will be too loose and will creak/make noise/not fit.

  11. #11
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    24,402
    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc View Post
    Yes it's necessary and yes have your local shop do it. They should have the right tools. If you do it yourself, you run the risk of taking too much material off and then your press fit stuff will be too loose and will creak/make noise/not fit.
    I'll rephrase this and say ONLY use the proper tools, which are way more expensive than just about any home mech is willing to spend. Not out of the realm of possibility, so if you want to buy them and use 'em right, have at it. Your shop will have them, though. DO NOT use sandpaper or files for this, as you run a far greater chance of doing a piss-poor job of it. Just buckle down and pay a shop to do it.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,607
    Thanks for the advice. Iíll bite the bullet and take it in.

    To Dirtjunkie: the rub with this situation is that itís a boutique bike (no names).

  13. #13
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    24,402
    Quote Originally Posted by Pisgah View Post
    Thanks for the advice. Iíll bite the bullet and take it in.

    To Dirtjunkie: the rub with this situation is that itís a boutique bike (no names).
    So what if it came off the Next sweatshop assembly line or was a one-off full custom bike? You can't prevent paint or powder coat overspray in every spot all the time, no matter how well you mask.

    You pretty much need to face/ream/chase threads on any brand new frame, though some frame manufacturers will do that before shipping the frame. Other manufacturers prefer to have the new owner do it, to avoid the issue of dmaging the prepped surfaces during shipping.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  14. #14
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    33,146
    Quote Originally Posted by Pisgah View Post
    Thanks for the advice. Iíll bite the bullet and take it in.

    To Dirtjunkie: the rub with this situation is that itís a boutique bike (no names).
    Oops! Hope it all works out.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,607
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    So what if it came off the Next sweatshop assembly line or was a one-off full custom bike? You can't prevent paint or powder coat overspray in every spot all the time, no matter how well you mask.

    Chill dude, I wasn't even writing to you. And this is my first bike with this issue.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    You can't prevent paint or powder coat overspray in every spot all the time, no matter how well you mask.
    Pretty goofy thing to say. Proper masking/plugging prevents over spray. They go hand in hand.

  17. #17
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    24,402
    Quote Originally Posted by Pisgah View Post
    Chill dude, I wasn't even writing to you. And this is my first bike with this issue.
    You were writing in a public forum, which opens your comments to other responses. It has always been this way. Some manufacturers prep frames for you, some don't. Either way, you should always have them checked because an already prepped frame might have been nicked or bumped before it got to you.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  18. #18
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    24,402
    Quote Originally Posted by Humpy View Post
    Pretty goofy thing to say. Proper masking/plugging prevents over spray. They go hand in hand.
    My comment was simply that shit happens sometimes. Even when masked, little bits might get by. The only way to have 100% clean surfaces on a frame will be to face/ream/chase those surfaces with sharp tools.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  19. #19
    Pro Crastinator
    Reputation: .WestCoastHucker.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,293
    over 40 years later, and i've still never reamed or chased a new frame or had a single issue...


  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,607
    Quote Originally Posted by .WestCoastHucker. View Post
    over 40 years later, and i've still never reamed or chased a new frame or had a single issue...
    Same here after 26 of years mountain biking and numerous individual frame buys.

    Edit: I've bought from this manufacturer in the past without trouble. So this is probably a one-off. But I am where I am.

  21. #21
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    24,402
    Quote Originally Posted by .WestCoastHucker. View Post
    over 40 years later, and i've still never reamed or chased a new frame or had a single issue...
    Quote Originally Posted by Pisgah View Post
    Same here after 26 of years mountain biking and numerous individual frame buys.
    and yet, sometimes they need it

  22. #22
    Pro Crastinator
    Reputation: .WestCoastHucker.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,293
    can't say i've ever seen one that needed it, my frame or otherwise. you preach it like a frame will explode if you don't...


  23. #23
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    24,402
    Quote Originally Posted by .WestCoastHucker. View Post
    can't say i've ever seen one that needed it, my frame or otherwise. you preach it like a frame will explode if you don't...
    It's something to pay attention to. If the frame needs it, then it needs it. No way around that. Throw bearings into a frame that needs prep work, without doing that work, and you're going to have problems with the bearings.

    I've built a few myself, and have worked in shops that have built a bunch of frames. One of the frames I've built needed the bb shell faced. Others I've built haven't needed it. The bikes at the shops have been a similar story. Many don't need it, but some do.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,489
    I don't understand why this is acceptable. I've gone in and reamed/ chased/ faced headtubes and BBs on several frames, but it always feels ridiculous to do so. If the BB threads and press-fit interfaces are not prepped, the frame has not gone through the whole manufacturing process. Is there something about the manufacturing process that I don't understand, other than laziness?

  25. #25
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    24,402
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    I don't understand why this is acceptable. I've gone in and reamed/ chased/ faced headtubes and BBs on several frames, but it always feels ridiculous to do so. If the BB threads and press-fit interfaces are not prepped, the frame has not gone through the whole manufacturing process. Is there something about the manufacturing process that I don't understand, other than laziness?
    Good question. I haven't seen enough frames that need it to have observed any sort of consistency, which is why I put it into the "shit happens" category.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,489
    How do you know they don't need it? I've done it to all of the frames I have owned and watched it done to many friends' frames. Head tubes look ok, then you hit it with the reamer and say "holy shite that was egg-shaped!" By the time you're done. I'm talking about steel hardtails, mostly, so maybe there is more tendency for precision on aluminum. I suppose reaming carbon fiber is a bad idea too.

  27. #27
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    24,402
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    How do you know they don't need it? I've done it to all of the frames I have owned and watched it done to many friends' frames. Head tubes look ok, then you hit it with the reamer and say "holy shite that was egg-shaped!" By the time you're done. I'm talking about steel hardtails, mostly, so maybe there is more tendency for precision on aluminum. I suppose reaming carbon fiber is a bad idea too.
    Put the tool in and you don't take off any material - it is kinda obvious on those that it has already been done.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,489
    I need a bigger sample, but IME, none of those frames we're reamed before they got to me. All of mine have been "budget" frames but it still seems weird to leave that step out. Why not just send it without any threads in the BB shell at all? I could tap them myself and save production costs!

    Thread derail alert! Why don't we use integated headset cus?aybe there is a good reason, but 45/45 ACB headsets have been the standard on nearly every BMX frame for over a decade, such that many BMX forks come with integrated crown races on the steerer tube. And all of those frames cost a fraction of what an equivalent mtb frame costs.

  29. #29
    the discerning hooligan
    Reputation: MOJO K's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,144
    Having the brake mounts faced is the other one too many people ignore....my Avid brakes never squealed.
    MERCY! MERCY! MERCY!

  30. #30
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    30,433
    Quote Originally Posted by .WestCoastHucker. View Post
    over 40 years later, and i've still never reamed or chased a new frame or had a single issue...
    Same here. If the QC is so bad they can't machine it to the tolerances for the parts that will be fitted, I don't need to be buying it.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    77
    I haven't had to ream or chase but have had to remove some paint.

    One is a machining operation that typically should be done by the manufacturer or to repair a flaw/damage though. The other is scraping away a paint booger with an Exacto knife.

    Even the most primitive Harbor Freight level products usually manage to keep the powder coat off the threaded or machined mating surfaces. It's inexcusable on a bicycle frame unless it's remedied at no cost to the customer.

Similar Threads

  1. Using Bottom Bracket Wrench vs. Bottom Bracket Socket
    By BobaX in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 05-21-2016, 10:36 PM
  2. Replacing a Shimano MTB HT II bottom bracket with a Shimano Road HT II bottom bracket
    By AndrwSwitch in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04-17-2015, 11:58 AM
  3. Angleset Headset and Bottom Bracket height
    By Ottoreni in forum Frame Building
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 11-26-2013, 05:16 AM
  4. Press fit headset and Bottom Bracket
    By dstepper in forum Turner
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-28-2013, 03:39 PM
  5. Hole in bottom of frame on bottom bracket?
    By concrete sledge in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-03-2007, 11:45 PM

Members who have read this thread: 98

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.