Results 1 to 78 of 78
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    446

    Overbiking - for safety?

    Maybe a dumb question, but....

    Anyone overbiking on purpose - for safety?

    I just was released from the hospital after having a pulmonary embolism. Since this is the second incident, looks like I'll be on anti-coags for...ever.
    Being on these meds, I need to be a bit more crash averse...even minor ones can turn into a PIA.

    B/c of this, I'm thinking up "upping" my bike search parameters from something like the SB130 or Pivot SB to the SB150 or FB29...maybe the Ripmo or new Offering. Not necessarily those specific bikes or brands...but to give an idea of what I'm thinking.

    Now, my terrain doesn't need such a big hit bike, by my thought is that the extra suspension will give a little bit of a safety factor (and piece of mind) for when riding.

    Maybe a dumb idea...but anyone else buy a bigger bike than terrain requires, just for an added safety margin???

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,400
    do whatever you have to do to justify buying a new bike. nothing wrong with that!

    do you think that over-biking yourself will give you a false sense of security? will it allow you to ride more risk-ily than you would otherwise?

  3. #3
    Nat
    Nat is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    13,018
    Any time I get a "bigger" bike I just go bigger while riding. Maybe you'd have better self-control than I do?

    You could wear body armor.

    And get a new bike.

  4. #4
    Thinking about riding.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    1,505
    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    Any time I get a "bigger" bike I just go bigger while riding. Maybe you'd have better self-control than I do?
    I'd be concerned about this, but if you think you've got the self-control then I think your thinking is sound. You can get away with a lot more mistakes on a longer-travel, slacker bike for sure.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    446
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    do whatever you have to do to justify buying a new bike. nothing wrong with that!

    do you think that over-biking yourself will give you a false sense of security? will it allow you to ride more risk-ily than you would otherwise?
    I'm getting a new bike either way...just thinking :bigger" now.

    But, I'd be lying if I said I wasn't worried about false confidence. I have a history of riding stupidly (go fast...hope for the best). But I'm hopeful that, b/c of the consequences, I can be smart enough to reign it in.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Joules's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,242
    Quote Originally Posted by smartyiak View Post
    Now, my terrain doesn't need such a big hit bike, by my thought is that the extra suspension will give a little bit of a safety factor (and piece of mind) for when riding.

    Maybe a dumb idea...but anyone else buy a bigger bike than terrain requires, just for an added safety margin???

    They must have gave you some crazy drugs if you honestly believe a little more suspension travel is going to prevent crashes. I'm going to bet no, no one has ever done that because it doesn't make the slightest bit of sense. That's like buying a sports car in an effort to drive slower.
    Seriously, that might take the cake as the dumbest idea I've seen expressed on here, and that's saying a lot.

    If you want to crash less, you need to take fewer risks. You can do that by riding easier trails, and slower or by becoming more skilled. Get some coaching if you need to spend money. Or some pads.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    581
    I think you'd be better off getting your suspension dialed in better than having more of it. Even though a few more mm of suspension does allow you to hit bigger stuff, 5 minutes on youtube would show just about anyone that 150/130 bike will do what most people would dare to try.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,400
    Do you ride alone or with friends? Instead of buying a new bike for your self, buy a bike for a friend so you always have someone to bail you out.

  9. #9
    Thinking about riding.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    1,505
    Quote Originally Posted by Joules View Post
    They must have gave you some crazy drugs if you honestly believe a little more suspension travel is going to prevent crashes. I'm going to bet no, no one has ever done that because it doesn't make the slightest bit of sense. That's like buying a sports car in an effort to drive slower.
    Seriously, that might take the cake as the dumbest idea I've seen expressed on here, and that's saying a lot.

    If you want to crash less, you need to take fewer risks. You can do that by riding easier trails, and slower or by becoming more skilled. Get some coaching if you need to spend money. Or some pads.
    Not only are you an ass for your delivery, but you're just wrong anyway. Try casing a jump on a hardtail, then try it on an enduro rig... Guess which time you'll crash?

    I've spent a lot of time doing DH and freeride stuff on trail bikes and while I can do just about anything on a 120mm bike that I can on my 150mm, I get away with a lot lazier technique on the bigger bike. On the short travel any little mistake sent me to the ground, now I'm shocked by what I get away with some days.

  10. #10
    Thinking about riding.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    1,505
    Quote Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post
    I think you'd be better off getting your suspension dialed in better than having more of it. Even though a few more mm of suspension does allow you to hit bigger stuff, 5 minutes on youtube would show just about anyone that 150/130 bike will do what most people would dare to try.
    Can barely understand this post, but assuming I do... I think you're missing the point. It's not about what can be done, it's about what mistakes can be ridden away from without crashing. You can absolutely ride away from bigger mistakes when you have more travel and a stiffer bike.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    446
    Quote Originally Posted by Joules View Post
    They must have gave you some crazy drugs if you honestly believe a little more suspension travel is going to prevent crashes. I'm going to bet no, no one has ever done that because it doesn't make the slightest bit of sense. That's like buying a sports car in an effort to drive slower.
    Seriously, that might take the cake as the dumbest idea I've seen expressed on here, and that's saying a lot.

    If you want to crash less, you need to take fewer risks. You can do that by riding easier trails, and slower or by becoming more skilled. Get some coaching if you need to spend money. Or some pads.
    I guess that's one "no" vote. But when you do disagree, are you always such a dick?

  12. #12
    Thinking about riding.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    1,505
    Quote Originally Posted by smartyiak View Post
    I guess that's one "no" vote. But when you do disagree, are you always such a dick?
    "Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge."

    -Chucky Darwin

  13. #13
    Nat
    Nat is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    13,018
    Quote Originally Posted by smartyiak View Post
    I have a history of riding stupidly (go fast...hope for the best).
    That's troubling.

    Get body armor.

  14. #14
    Nat
    Nat is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    13,018
    Quote Originally Posted by Joules View Post
    They must have gave you some crazy drugs if you honestly believe a little more suspension travel is going to prevent crashes. I'm going to bet no, no one has ever done that because it doesn't make the slightest bit of sense. That's like buying a sports car in an effort to drive slower.
    Seriously, that might take the cake as the dumbest idea I've seen expressed on here, and that's saying a lot.

    If you want to crash less, you need to take fewer risks. You can do that by riding easier trails, and slower or by becoming more skilled. Get some coaching if you need to spend money. Or some pads.
    Now that wasn't very nice.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    446
    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    That's troubling.

    Get body armor.
    I think I was a bit inarticulate. What I mean is: it's not that I don't have any skills or can't pick lines, rather in the past, I haven't generally let fears of crashing prevent me from taking a line or trail that looked fun.

    I'm thinking that will be different now and I'll have to take "potential for fail" into account. Maybe go slower...maybe pick my way down. Whatever it is, I imagine it will be different.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    18
    Best solution for safety: Hire a skills coach, take skills clinics, and use online coaching resources.

    Do that in conjunction with ensuring your bike is in great working condition and the suspension is set up for you.

  17. #17
    mbtr member
    Reputation: scottzg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    5,158
    I tend to ride to the same perceived level of risk regardless of what bike i'm on. A burly bike just makes me feel safer so i adjust my riding accordingly. It's like the bike changes my vision. Another NO vote for me.





    On the other hand, i'll wear kneepads for XC; they don't make me feel safe.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  18. #18
    Nat
    Nat is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    13,018
    Quote Originally Posted by smartyiak View Post
    I think I was a bit inarticulate. What I mean is: it's not that I don't have any skills or can't pick lines, rather in the past, I haven't generally let fears of crashing prevent me from taking a line or trail that looked fun.

    I'm thinking that will be different now and I'll have to take "potential for fail" into account. Maybe go slower...maybe pick my way down. Whatever it is, I imagine it will be different.
    On the other hand, will riding while consciously thinking about the penalty for failure lead to more crashing if you're not "in the zone" so-to-speak?

    I'll admit I consider the penalty for injury more now that my wife is semi-retired, I have kids approaching college, and I'm the sole provider. I bought a bigger enduro bike (160/160) and when I swap back to my 150/140 trail bike I see that have much more control on the bigger bike, but at the same time that increased confidence encourages me to hit bigger jumps and go faster overall. D'oh.

    I rarely ride without knee guards now, and have a lightweight enduro full-face helmet that I can use on challenging trail rides.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: d365's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,001
    I think going from a 100mm XC bike to a 130mm trail bike, is not a bad idea at all. Slacker HA, and a bit more travel will undoubtably give more room for error, while still pedaling well enough to keep your trails from getting boring. I would definitely look at bike with increased front travel, if nothing else.

  20. #20
    Nat
    Nat is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    13,018
    Hey, good point. Bigger bikes not only have more travel, they also tend to have more forgiving geometry. New bike time!!!

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JoePAz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    4,710
    Quote Originally Posted by smartyiak View Post
    Maybe a dumb question, but....

    Anyone overbiking on purpose - for safety?
    Safety comes down to what trails you ride and how you ride them. If you ride at or above your skill level you are more likely to crash. Even then you can still crash in silly spots.

    Personally I am more likely to crash on my 5" trail bike than my HT single speed. The reason is that on my 5" bike I am encouraged to try tougher lines and more crazy trails I would simply walk on my HT. The only exception is when I am racing my HT or my XC bike. Racing involves pushing the limits and crashes can happen doing that on any bike. I am mostly likely to crash hard in an Enduro race where I have to take nasty techy features at speed.


    So it might be best to get a Rigid 29+ singlespeed. The plus tires mean a little more grip in the turns and lack of suspension keeps the speeds down so any crash is simply slower. Plus you will simply walk the crazy tech lines and not crash. Big big means bike speeds over rough terrain so when you do crash it will not be a small one. Or look at it this way Who wears the most armor? DH racers or XC racers.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  22. #22
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    4,736
    I've been a blood thinners for life rider for awhile now. I ride a 120/100 full suspension 29er and a 80mm hardtail 26er, both XC steep geo bikes. I ride faster than ever now, but that is due to better skills and a dropper on my fully, with one for the hardtail arriving next week. The dropper allows me to descend faster but I still feel like it is much safer overall. I sometimes remind myself that a bad crash could lead to me no longer riding; I'd rather play it a bit safer and be sure I stay on the trails for years to come. I don't ride skinnies or things with a really high cost of failure unless it is something I'm confident on.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

  23. #23
    Bikesexual
    Reputation: jcd46's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    5,974
    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    Hey, good point. Bigger bikes not only have more travel, they also tend to have more forgiving geometry. New bike time!!!
    Plus its always implied, that if you are overbiked, you are "cheating" right?

    So it has to help with safety, I fall far less on my trail bike than I did with my first BD bike.
    The Orange Fleet:

    '16 SC Heckler
    '14 All City MMD
    '12 Kona Unit Rigid

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    721
    Quote Originally Posted by smartyiak View Post
    Maybe a dumb question, but....

    Anyone overbiking on purpose - for safety?

    I just was released from the hospital after having a pulmonary embolism. Since this is the second incident, looks like I'll be on anti-coags for...ever.
    Being on these meds, I need to be a bit more crash averse...even minor ones can turn into a PIA.

    B/c of this, I'm thinking up "upping" my bike search parameters from something like the SB130 or Pivot SB to the SB150 or FB29...maybe the Ripmo or new Offering. Not necessarily those specific bikes or brands...but to give an idea of what I'm thinking.

    Now, my terrain doesn't need such a big hit bike, by my thought is that the extra suspension will give a little bit of a safety factor (and piece of mind) for when riding.

    Maybe a dumb idea...but anyone else buy a bigger bike than terrain requires, just for an added safety margin???
    Ummm, not just a PIA, but a flat fatality. Coumadin and Warfarin are serious stuff, you don't even want to get a bad bruise on those, much less a concussion or cut.

    I would seriously consider dialing back my riding, or quitting altogether.

  25. #25
    Rides all the bikes!
    Reputation: Sidewalk's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    2,388
    A bigger bike makes me just go bigger. And has the side effect of making me go bigger than I should when I step back down on to my XC bike again.

    Sadly, my 160mm 29er has me currently underbiked at the bike park. But is just right for most of my riding.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: One Pivot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    7,787
    I bought a bigger bike and I suppose I do go bigger, and I'm absolutely safer. My injuries this season were a scraped arm which didnt even put me off the bike a day.

    Im not going to pretend the bike doesnt cover up my hack skills. It totally does! And its a lot of fun. I ride longer, harder, further, and safer all season long.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jeremy3220's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    992
    Quote Originally Posted by smartyiak View Post
    Now, my terrain doesn't need such a big hit bike, by my thought is that the extra suspension will give a little bit of a safety factor (and piece of mind) for when riding.
    That depends. On normal singletrack I don't think there's any significant advantage to an enduro bike over a mid travel trail bike. It's still just as easy to accidentally clip a tree, slide out in a loose turn, etc. The safety factor of those bikes is going to come in when you're hitting big drops, jumps, rock gardens at speed, or some other more extreme riding situation.

  28. #28
    Trail Ninja
    Reputation: Varaxis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    5,096
    I'd go bigger more for the geometry than any preconceptions about what travel does.

    "Overbiked" is a vague descriptor. From what I gather, it's your ability to make your frame and parts to flex to unexpected/unwanted levels, perceived to be inefficient. If your suspension & tires are overly compliant (squishy/draggy) = overbiked. If your frame, fork, wheels, etc. are overly compliant (flexy) = underbiked.

    The perception is the key. If you fool yourself to see it differently, you can't be overbiked. Others can convince you otherwise though, but their arguments tend to just cherry pick very few points. Our senses are initially dull, so whatever you're feeling is often mis-attributed to the wrong cause. You gotta break down the ego and prove it to be wrong and a piece of shit before you get trained up to be smarter; it's like putting your mind through military boot camp. What could feel like an inefficient bike, could just be bad bearings somewhere. What could be a creak in the headset or BB area, could be at the axles...

    In the weekly group I ride with, the tall riders are on short travel bikes, while the short riders are all on Enduro bikes. It's no coincidence... it's the geo (wheelbase at around ~1180). I'm very reluctant to go for a XC bike, since their geo is so old fashioned and doesn't suit my slightly less than average height, even new ones like the Sniper and SB100. As long as it feels stiff enough in all the right places and spins freely...
    We're all on the same ship, and it's sinking.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    446
    Quote Originally Posted by TwiceHorn View Post
    Ummm, not just a PIA, but a flat fatality...I would seriously consider dialing back my riding, or quitting altogether.
    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    I've been a blood thinners for life rider for awhile now. I ride a...
    Chazpat, my doctor, and I all disagree with you. My first PE was in 2011. Both then and now, my Dr. said it was OK for me to ride...I just need to be cautious.

    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    It's still just as easy to accidentally clip a tree, slide out in a loose turn, etc. The safety factor of those bikes is going to come in when you're hitting big drops, jumps, rock gardens at speed, or some other more extreme riding situation.
    That's a good point...and I don't think I'll be doing big drops or extreme stuff anymore...mostly just plain old single track.

    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    I'd go bigger more for the geometry than any preconceptions about what travel does.
    Another good point.

    And to those that recommend body armor...I'll start looking for some elbow and knee pads that I can tolerate. Anyone using shorts with hip pads? How about packs with back protection???

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by TheDwayyo View Post
    I've spent a lot of time doing DH and freeride stuff on trail bikes and while I can do just about anything on a 120mm bike that I can on my 150mm, I get away with a lot lazier technique on the bigger bike. On the short travel any little mistake sent me to the ground, now I'm shocked by what I get away with some days.
    I'm not as skilled as many on here, but even so (or maybe because of that) I can say that yeah a more forgiving bike can make a huge difference. I have way more fun on my trailbike than I ever did on my old XC bike, and a big part of that is that I'm not worried about crashing every time my wheels leave the ground.

    I think it's kind of hard to overbike these days anyway, so long as you aren't concerned about your times or doing long XC rides. There's a lot of very capable bikes out there that still pedal pretty decently.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    721
    Quote Originally Posted by smartyiak View Post
    Chazpat, my doctor, and I all disagree with you. My first PE was in 2011. Both then and now, my Dr. said it was OK for me to ride...I just need to be cautious.



    That's a good point...and I don't think I'll be doing big drops or extreme stuff anymore...mostly just plain old single track.



    Another good point.

    And to those that recommend body armor...I'll start looking for some elbow and knee pads that I can tolerate. Anyone using shorts with hip pads? How about packs with back protection???
    Hey, that's fine, I'm not a doc. I have had two relatives die on Coumadin after relatively minor falls (brain bleeds). Just be super careful.

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jeremy3220's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    992
    Quote Originally Posted by prlundberg View Post
    I have way more fun on my trailbike than I ever did on my old XC bike, and a big part of that is that I'm not worried about crashing every time my wheels leave the ground.
    I don't think that's quite the same as the situation OP is in. He's comparing an SB130 to an SB150, not an old XC bike. Once you're on a bike that's well matched to the terrain, going to a bigger bike doesn't have much of a benefit outside of maybe being able to go a bit faster on the descents. A bmx bike is better suited for leaving the ground than an XC bike.
    Last edited by jeremy3220; 10-06-2018 at 05:22 AM.

  33. #33
    Make America Bike Again
    Reputation: richj8990's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    1,410
    I underbike for safety. No desire to go more than 15 mph downhill on one of those fancy long-travel full-suspension bikes. Zero desire, no joke.
    Coffee, Ted?
    Ted's from a dysfunctional family.
    Oh...so no coffee...
    ---Samuel L. Jackson, Loaded Weapon I

  34. #34
    Make America Bike Again
    Reputation: richj8990's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    1,410
    Quote Originally Posted by smartyiak View Post
    Maybe a dumb question, but....

    Anyone overbiking on purpose - for safety?

    I just was released from the hospital after having a pulmonary embolism. Since this is the second incident, looks like I'll be on anti-coags for...ever.
    Being on these meds, I need to be a bit more crash averse...even minor ones can turn into a PIA.

    B/c of this, I'm thinking up "upping" my bike search parameters from something like the SB130 or Pivot SB to the SB150 or FB29...maybe the Ripmo or new Offering. Not necessarily those specific bikes or brands...but to give an idea of what I'm thinking.

    Now, my terrain doesn't need such a big hit bike, by my thought is that the extra suspension will give a little bit of a safety factor (and piece of mind) for when riding.

    Maybe a dumb idea...but anyone else buy a bigger bike than terrain requires, just for an added safety margin???

    Hey smartyiak. Google Vitamin E Quinone as an anticoagulant. Just don't mix too much E and your prescription meds. One or the other.
    Coffee, Ted?
    Ted's from a dysfunctional family.
    Oh...so no coffee...
    ---Samuel L. Jackson, Loaded Weapon I

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    354
    On my XC hardtail, I won't send it on big jumps or ride overly aggressive because I don't want to break the frame. So it's a hell of a lot safer than when I'm riding a long travel bike where I will just launch off of everything.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    190
    Quote Originally Posted by smartyiak View Post
    Chazpat, my doctor, and I all disagree with you. My first PE was in 2011. Both then and now, my Dr. said it was OK for me to ride...I just need to be cautious.



    That's a good point...and I don't think I'll be doing big drops or extreme stuff anymore...mostly just plain old single track.



    Another good point.

    And to those that recommend body armor...I'll start looking for some elbow and knee pads that I can tolerate. Anyone using shorts with hip pads? How about packs with back protection???
    Shinguards. After years of no problems, i just gaffed my shin two weeks ago. No amount of bike would have prevented it, i was starting from a stop and foot inexplicably slipped off. Perfectly dry, level, wide, smooth trail.
    So yes, its hot but id pad up.

  37. #37
    Formerly of Kent
    Reputation: Le Duke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    9,905

    Overbiking - for safety?

    So, the OP is on blood thinners, and we’re talking about wearing things that will actively thicken his blood.

    You know, through increased heat retention, thermal stress and accelerated dehydration. And, you’ll also increase your time spent climbing!

    Brilliant!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Death from Below.

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation: plummet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    389
    If you get more head angle slackness and suspension you will indeed be able to go the same speed/track safer. You can indeed go faster and still be safer.

    But you can still find the limit of yourself and the bike. That will be at a higher speed/tech than your current bike.

    The interesting thing that a bigger bike does is increase the range of what is now considered safe riding. You will be able to hit bigger lines more tech and still be withing the comfort zone.

    The down side is that you will give away some of the snap of a lower travel, steeper head angle bike. The normal track may become mundane for you. If you are more xc orientated and like the snap and climbing acceleration of less travel a bigger bike may reduce your fun factor.

    Also you need to commit to speed to get the most out of big travel. It wont help you out much if you are tootling along at standard trail bike speeds. Big bikes demand you commit to speed and smashing hard through sections. Do that and they reward you with safety and awesomeness blowing through and out the otherside of section that would normally punish you. Tootle through, non commited, not fast enough then you will just have a slow wollowy bike thats no safer than what you have now.

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    446
    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    So, the OP is on blood thinners, and we’re talking about wearing things that will actively thicken his blood.

    You know, through increased heat retention, thermal stress and accelerated dehydration.

    Brilliant!
    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Yeah...I thought of that. I’m gonna try and find some lighter, we’ll ventilated ones.

    I usually use a camelback anyways; maybe the back protector ones arent be that much extra weight/heat. Those new SBs do take a water bottle though!

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    361
    I think the idea has merit.

  41. #41
    WillWorkForTrail
    Reputation: Cotharyus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    4,248
    I've never personally bought more bike than I needed for...well, any reason really. Now, I DID put my wife on a 130/130 bike a couple years back even though she really only rides easy XC trails. Why? Because she isn't worried about going fast, but she does get intimidated when things start to "feel" rough. See, she likes riding, she just doesn't have a great deal of confidence, and no real desire to "attack" - so while it's more bike than she needs, it allows her to be more confident because it makes the trails she rides seem easier.

    Now then. Having said that, I feel certain that there could be problems with you buying a bigger bike. Have you considered.....a rigid single speed?

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,018
    A modern trail bike is incredibly capable to begin with. If a change is getting there I don't see it as overbiking.

    There are probably lessons in my seeing Trek engineering and design acquaintances only ride bigger bikes for serious stuff most
    riders do not do. Air time and landing most do not do.

    Not too many years ago I would not think the specs of my modern trail bike would do about anything but it's honestly more capable as a 130/140 reverse mullet setup than my last AM type bike. We did a family trip in CO this summer so had rental bikes too. The reality was the bigger rental bikes were for the most part only appropriate for bike park and truly expert stuff. My modern Fuel EX was better on expert trails than my last generation AM bike with more travel.

    With kids, a fleet of bikes, different price points and a whole bunch of riding AND old age I see most safety, performance and capability is from my bike engine once I'm on a modern bike.
    ƃuoɹʍ llɐ ʇno əɯɐɔ ʇɐɥʇ

  43. #43
    CEO Product Failure
    Reputation: bingemtbr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    928
    Skimming through the thread and I'm not familiar with all medical terms--if the worry is about bruising and bleeding (kinda the same thing) then get/wear armor and pads. My recommendation would be G-Form pads but wear whatever works for you. Regarding bike type, to each their own. Try several: big hit, XC, all mountain, enduro and see what you're most comfortable with.

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    446
    Quote Originally Posted by bingemtbr View Post
    Skimming through the thread and I'm not familiar with all medical terms--if the worry is about bruising and bleeding (kinda the same thing) then get/wear armor and pads....
    Specific to me, that's the major concern...but I was asking more generally ... whether b/c of clots, frail bones, head/neck injuries, or just feeling safer on a bike.

    I was just curious of others' experience.

  45. #45
    the discerning hooligan
    Reputation: MOJO K's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,035
    I went with bigger tires. This is one situation where it's hard to argue against more traction. I do use a set of padded downhill undershorts (Rockgardns that I picked up cheap) to protect my hips. The bigger part of it has been making the adjustments to my "acceptable risk" parameters. There's a time to push the boundaries and a time to pull them back in.
    MERCY! MERCY! MERCY!

  46. #46
    LMN
    LMN is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,248
    I find that most crashes happen for two reasons.

    1. The most common case is what I call a random. You were riding and got too close to a bush that twisted your bars, or you clipped your pedals, or the apex of turn had no grip. With experience these happen less but they never disappear.

    2. The other kind is when you are pushing your ability level. Would over biking help prevent these? Honestly I don't think so. The best way to avoid these is with good decision making.
    Last edited by LMN; 10-08-2018 at 06:24 PM.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation: d365's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,001
    Quote Originally Posted by LMN View Post
    The best way to avoid these is with good discussion making.
    talking about it never stopped me from crashing...

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    113
    I'm in favor of overbiking for safety -- in my experience, I've found that it's much safer to be over the bike than under it. Most of the time that I'm over the bike, I'm pedaling. I'm usually only under the bike if I fall over or crash.

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mike Aswell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    448
    I could be wrong (have a parent on blood thinners, know enough to be dangerous) but the things I would be most worried about are: major head impact and a really significant cut or impact.

    While I think things like armor, bike choice, etc are all important, the only way to really lower your chances of these events is to avoid certain situations. Which means riding more cautiously, unfortunately.

    People have already mentioned this but my most common "oh shit that was close" occurrence is nearly clipping a small (but immobile) tree. My worst head impact ever was a crash on a fire road.

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Darth Lefty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    891
    This thread reminds me of the motorcycle salesmen who convince utter newbies to buy 200hp literbikes

  51. #51
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    310
    Quote Originally Posted by LMN View Post
    I find that most crashes happen for two reasons.

    1. The most common case is what I call a random. You were riding and got too close to a bush that twisted your bars, or you clipped your pedals, or the apex of turn had no grip. With experience these happen less but they never disappear.

    2. The other kind is when you are pushing your ability level. Would over biking help prevent these? Honestly I don't think so. The best way to avoid these is with good decision making.
    I agree with point 1, but don't with point 2. I've had some experience that would suggest that a bigger bike will prevent crashed when pushing it.

    I rode some of the same trails at a downhill park recently on a rented dedicated downhill bike and on my 150 trail bike. No crashes with the downhill bike, two with the trail bike. The downhill bike just sucked up and rolled over things that tossed the trail bike.

    Similarly, when I upgraded from an old steep hta hard tail to a more modern trail bike, my crashes dropped immediately and precipitously. My skills hadn't gotten better over night. I just had a much greater margin for error. To be fair, the difference between a low and mid travel modern trail bike is nowhere near the jump between my first and second bikes (when I jumped again from a 120 to 150 trail bike, I didn't notice any decrease in crashes as I already was almost never crashing). Still, my experience does suggest that riding a bigger bike will keep you upright at times if you're riding similarly to how you would with a shorter travel one.

  52. #52
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    47
    I could make the case the a heavier bike will tire you out quicker and you're more likely to make a mistake and hurt yourself when tired than having an extra 30mm of travel...

  53. #53
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    310
    Quote Originally Posted by briank View Post
    I could make the case the a heavier bike will tire you out quicker and you're more likely to make a mistake and hurt yourself when tired than having an extra 30mm of travel...
    But is the weight really likely to be a big deal? I can't find the weight difference for the SB130 vs SB150, but for the 2018 Bronson vs. 5010, the weight difference was pretty darn minimal. Transition actually lists weights on their website and the difference seems to range from half a pound to a pound for similarly specced bikes with 20-30mm of suspension travel difference. That's not a huge amount and depending on what terrain he's riding, he might be less tired with the bigger bike as it would be soaking up more of the rough stuff.

    I do agree with someone who said earlier that geometry has much more to do with it than suspension travel, though they tend to correlate.

  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    47
    Fair point. I recently had a discussion about a Specialized camber and stumpy and the weight difference (or lack thereof) between them.

    I think you are right geometry has a bigger impact. A 29er with a slack geo is going to allow you to be sloppier and just roll over stuff. Probably safer than an XC race bike...

  55. #55
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mr Pig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    10,347
    Quote Originally Posted by smartyiak View Post
    Anyone overbiking on purpose - for safety?
    Yes, I kinda did and agree with your logic.

    Most of the trails I ride can be handled perfectly well on a hard-tail. What I found though was that my poor riding skills were getting me into trouble. For example, I regularly landed small jumps badly and was almost bucked off the bike.

    Getting a full-sus gave me a safety net. I could ride the same trails at the same speed and the bike would deal with mistakes I would not have gotten away with on the hard-tail.

    Here's the thing though, I don't crash any less! I now fly down trails I would be hesitant to ride at all on the hard-tail. The full-sus is not really safer as I have just upped the speed to regain the thrill.

  56. #56
    www.ninjichor.com
    Reputation: ninjichor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    544
    Good geo keeps you from crashing. You're golden one you find that "magic" balance in which you can just relax in your pedaling position and let the bike do most of the work. On such geo, most of the mistakes are you own, since it gives you more opportunity to manhandle the bike, trying something new. If you try to relax on a bike that has poor geo, it'll either send you OTB (nose-heavy bike) or the front wheel will get kicked off its intended line (rear-heavy bike). Both need you to put in effort to compensate for the poorly balanced geo, getting your weight low and back on a nose-heavy bike, or aggressively tucked with your chin over the stem on a rear-heavy bike. Relaxing is akin to dropping your guard. Go into a jump without a warm-up to get the feel right, and you'll risk going splat from "stinkbugging" (ass-end high) on the nose-heavy bike. The rear heavy bike is nicer on jumps.

    A modern bike like a SB150 in M, has this "magic" balance dialed. If you ride the SB150 in small and the SB150 in large, you'll probably notice that they'll feel slightly off. You won't be able to figure it out, unless you had the knowledge, but the size M will just feel more comfortable out of the saddle, as if you can relax more and have more confidence, naturally. That's why I call it "magic". It's not magic, but math. These bikes hit these marks through trial and error. It's just chance now that short folk can enjoy dialed geo.

    P.S. size up to the large Ripmo. M Offering is dialed too. Ripmo's on the top of my list, personally. I just need to get off my lazy butt and sell, instead of writing posts.

  57. #57
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    5,108
    Overbiking? How about just ride what you like for comfort and the trails you ride. MA guy. 6" on the enduro is perfect for all rocks, roots, chunk and trees that are on most of the trails.

  58. #58
    Rides all the bikes!
    Reputation: Sidewalk's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    2,388
    I'll be doing an accidental experiment shortly. My new girlfriend has taken an interest in cycling, and MTB in particular. She really likes my Enduro, but we can't both ride it at the same time. So far she has ridden on a fireroad, and faster than I was comfortable with her going...

    I am putting together my old trail bike, which is virtually a modern XC bike (same geo with 130mm travel). So I will be able to compare directly a new rider on a less capable bike to a more capable bike.


    Quote Originally Posted by MarcusBrody View Post
    I rode some of the same trails at a downhill park recently on a rented dedicated downhill bike and on my 150 trail bike. No crashes with the downhill bike, two with the trail bike. The downhill bike just sucked up and rolled over things that tossed the trail bike.
    Not what I consider a fair comparison. My first time at Snow Summit bike park I was on a borrowed XC hard tail. My next time back, on my Enduro. I didn't crash on the HT, but I did on my Enduro. AND, when I did crash, I crash at a MUCH higher rate of speed.

    The DH bike you rented was 'safer' for you because your intensity didn't go up to match the abilities of the bike. If you were to ride at the same level intensity, you would have just crashed twice at a higher rate of speed (or, higher elevation if you like to jump).

    I was only getting a couple of feet off the ramp on the HT. On my Enduro, I am getting WAY higher.

  59. #59
    Thinking about riding.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    1,505
    Quote Originally Posted by Sidewalk View Post
    The DH bike you rented was 'safer' for you because your intensity didn't go up to match the abilities of the bike.
    So? That doesn't matter as it relates to his direct question. All other things (riding style/intensity/whatever included) being equal, it is safer to ride 'overbiked.' I don't understand why so many are unwilling to concede that seemingly obvious point.

    Put an average (not by our standards, but by the whole world's) rider on a road bike and then on a DH bike and have them ride over some small bumps, curves and such... Which bike are they more likely to crash on? I dare you to try and argue for the DH bike. Double dog.

  60. #60
    Rides all the bikes!
    Reputation: Sidewalk's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    2,388
    Quote Originally Posted by TheDwayyo View Post
    So? That doesn't matter as it relates to his direct question. All other things (riding style/intensity/whatever included) being equal, it is safer to ride 'overbiked.' I don't understand why so many are unwilling to concede that seemingly obvious point.

    Put an average (not by our standards, but by the whole world's) rider on a road bike and then on a DH bike and have them ride over some small bumps, curves and such... Which bike are they more likely to crash on? I dare you to try and argue for the DH bike. Double dog.
    I already answered that in my post, you chose to ignore it.

    The bike isn't safer, the rider is more passive.

    Put me on a DH bike, and I am not safer. I will go faster, and get bigger air than I already get with my Enduro.

    If you want to be safer, ride safer.

    See his below quote:

    Quote Originally Posted by smartyiak View Post
    But, I'd be lying if I said I wasn't worried about false confidence. I have a history of riding stupidly (go fast...hope for the best).

  61. #61
    Rides like a girl
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    266
    OMG, you guys. The OP wants to spend some $$ on more bike than he needs just 'cuz he WANTS to.

    If you can afford the bike, buy the bike.

    Next topic.......
    17 Kona Hei Hei Trail 27.5
    15 Framed Minnesota 3.0XWT

  62. #62
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    310
    Quote Originally Posted by TheDwayyo View Post
    So? That doesn't matter as it relates to his direct question. All other things (riding style/intensity/whatever included) being equal, it is safer to ride 'overbiked.' I don't understand why so many are unwilling to concede that seemingly obvious point.

    Put an average (not by our standards, but by the whole world's) rider on a road bike and then on a DH bike and have them ride over some small bumps, curves and such... Which bike are they more likely to crash on? I dare you to try and argue for the DH bike. Double dog.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sidewalk View Post
    I already answered that in my post, you chose to ignore it.

    The bike isn't safer, the rider is more passive.

    Put me on a DH bike, and I am not safer. I will go faster, and get bigger air than I already get with my Enduro.

    If you want to be safer, ride safer.

    See his below quote:
    I'm with Dwayyo on this one. Obviously if you ride at the very limit for the bike, you're going to crash similarly, but the whole premise of the original question is riding the same trails (roughly similarly). The fact that the OP notes that he'd have to be careful not to fall into the false confidence trap with the bigger bike doesn't change that.
    Last edited by MarcusBrody; 10-15-2018 at 05:01 PM.

  63. #63
    Rides all the bikes!
    Reputation: Sidewalk's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    2,388
    Quote Originally Posted by HotHead View Post
    OMG, you guys. The OP wants to spend some $$ on more bike than he needs just 'cuz he WANTS to.

    If you can afford the bike, buy the bike.

    Next topic.......
    Buy bike.
    Get off internet.
    Ride bike.

    Problem solved

  64. #64
    Nat
    Nat is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    13,018
    Quote Originally Posted by HotHead View Post
    OMG, you guys. The OP wants to spend some $$ on more bike than he needs just 'cuz he WANTS to.

    If you can afford the bike, buy the bike.

    Next topic.......
    Yeah, he probably already bought the bike along with a whole bunch of new accessories -- for safety of course. That old helmet was probably cracked even if it looked fine...

  65. #65
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bigdrunk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,223
    Don’t overlook over-tire’ing either. Buy a nice modern trail bike and slap a Maxxis DHR on the front and a DHR II and the rear. I bet having real tires will bail you out of trouble the same or more than reasonably traveled trail bike.

    Sick with the SB130

  66. #66
    www.ninjichor.com
    Reputation: ninjichor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    544
    Random question: How many here have actually ridden a DH bike or a bike with 170+mm travel on anything remotely challenging, compared to what you usually ride?

    Tell me how you thought it would feel, before you actually experienced it? Tell me how your actual experience differed from your prejudice.

    To me, the DH bike was a rental and I thought it would be clapped out... it was, but it was super safe and confidence inspiring nonetheless. The front end was so kicked out compared to what I was used to, that I was skeptical of getting along easily. I intended to start off taking it easy, but I just never felt a need to rein it back, letting it build up speed, and it only got better. I can't attribute any of that to the suspension, being in such disrepair. It only made me want to ride bikes that offered a similar feel, but with actual working components. I started thinking how I could get the best of both worlds--the new Enduro bikes are like that. If anything, it exposed just how physically demanding XC bikes are when they don't have to be (a few geo tweaks can make them so much more capable)... it's weird how people spend $$$$ in a battle against gravity and keep going back for pain/suffering, when there's a whole discipline that uses it as fuel for actual enjoyment.

    Things I learned: I absolutely hate clunky and clanky bikes. A heavy bike doesn't handle that badly at all. I can still pedal it up a hill, but accelerating on a bike from a near stand-still with non-functioning dampers just felt like a buzz kill when you see your buddies pedal off ahead of you. Changing to a sit-and-spin strategy worked out to keep up fine, though I doubt I could do that for hours. When the bike is so long and not overly reactive to the ground, it feels like things are in slow-mo. I had to reprogram my habits of anticipating obstacles so far in advance. The bike could probably handle them without me doing anything, but I unweighted the wheels out of habit. It felt way more balanced on jumps, almost effortless. I was just tricking off of jumps cause I needed something to do. Didn't have to preload or pull back--just go fast and be light on the bike, letting it float, perhaps doing the laziest version of a bunnyhop to not get in the bike's way. I felt like I finally understood what the pros were saying... they don't over think it and it just happens. It's the damn bike's geo being dialed for them. The fortunate few that happen to be the right size/shape and get the bike size that was dialed in--they don't know the suffering of very short people on short travel bikes and very tall people on long travel bikes.

    For real, it's the damn geo. I thought it was old age, losing "skill" I once had when I was riding 26ers, having switched to 29ers. Used to think small wheels were for style and 29 for speed, but now with geo getting better on 29ers... won't need to be looking at long travel 29ers if they keep getting longer. People are probably tired of "slacker, longer, lower" being echo'd, but that's not even the point. It's the balance that matters. I don't care for the HA or whatever, I want to a bike that has roughly equal space forward and behind a pedal positioned at 3 o'clock (to the axles, or tires if they're the same size). I bet the smaller folks are excited, but don't know why, and bet that there's sure to be grumbling from tall folk who have been needing to size down. The people who already felt dialed perhaps are sizing down after trying different sizes. Makes me wonder how people expect to build a solid foundation of skills on such compromised bikes... it's no wonder people make fun of teams like "Sho-Air" calling them "No-Air", not to make fun of their riders/team, but the XC racing discipline itself.

    I want a long wheelbase rigid 29er just for kicks now... wonder if I can just have a random Asian factory make me a sample if I send them a 2d drawing.
    Last edited by ninjichor; 10-12-2018 at 08:06 PM.

  67. #67
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    446
    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    Yeah, he probably already bought the bike along with a whole bunch of new accessories -- for safety of course. That old helmet was probably cracked even if it looked fine...
    Or not....but: whatever.

  68. #68
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    23,898
    I absolutely don't agree with the belief that a mtb with more suspension is safer, in any way. The problem is that longer travel bikes frequently ALSO have frame geometry that IS "safer" for general riding (puts the rider into a more stable and centered position, allowing them to adjust to a wider range of terrain), and it's taking some time for that geometry to trickle down into other bikes.

    My current 100mm FS bike is WAY less crash-prone than my old 100mm FS bike (from 2003, so a VERY big difference in frame geometries). Has nothing to do with the amount of suspension, since that was equal between both bikes. My riding skills were not suddenly different when I got the other bike built up, either.

    I DO have some reference to health scares changing my mentality on the bike, though. I was diagnosed with leukemia nearly 10yrs ago now, and a major lingering side-effect I have is chronically low platelet counts, so my clotting times are longer. Not identical to taking blood thinners, but not entirely different, either. I ABSOLUTELY have become more risk-averse in my riding. I have handled it a couple of ways.

    For one, I'm a LOT less afraid to say "nope" when I encounter a section of trail that makes me uncomfortable. Most of it is honestly stuff I have the skills to ride, but my problem is with the consequences. Typically, that's related to how far I'd have to fall before I hit the ground, or what the ground is composed of, giving me a list of likely injuries in the event of failure. It's also related to speed. Consequences of hitting the ground go up a LOT with increased speed. So yeah, I do think about that stuff a lot more on my rides now than I used to.

    I also have spent more time on fundamental skills. I've worked with coaches, taken some clinics, and even got certified as a skills coach. Learning fundamentals has made me better at pretty much everything on the bike. That, in combination with more focus on mini risk assessments throughout my ride, as well as riding a bike with a more forgiving geometry, has me crashing a WHOLE LOT LESS than I used to.

    I also tend to ride with people who take fewer risks while riding, because I don't want to be pressured to take more risk. I have legit medical reasons for that, and frankly, I want to be able to ride again the next day and not be nursing some injury or fixing some broken part.

  69. #69
    Nat
    Nat is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    13,018
    Quote Originally Posted by smartyiak View Post
    Or not....but: whatever.
    What's the hold-up? We need new bike porn!

  70. #70
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jeremy3220's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    992
    Quote Originally Posted by ninjichor View Post

    To me, the DH bike was a rental and I thought it would be clapped out... it was, but it was super safe and confidence inspiring nonetheless.
    If you're talking about renting a DH bike at a DH park then that's just using the appropriate amount of bike. OP is talking about overbiking. An enduro bike isn't going to help on tame singletrack. It might even be more dangerous. The longer bikes are more cumbersome on tight terrain. I could see someone crashing more easily trying to navigate a tight hairy switchback on a longer bike.

  71. #71
    Nat
    Nat is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    13,018
    Quote Originally Posted by ninjichor View Post
    Random question: How many here have actually ridden a DH bike or a bike with 170+mm travel on anything remotely challenging, compared to what you usually ride?
    I have. DH bikes let me ride some crazy lines that I wouldn't have attempted otherwise. Bigger safety margin.

  72. #72
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sturge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    810
    I go with geo being more of a factor for preventing crashes. Picture shows difference between my '12 SC Heckler (26") and '18 Kona (27.5).
    Both in XL frame size. Both have similar travel (Heckler 5"/Kona 6"), both are 2.4 tire width running tubeless at about 22psi.
    Overbiking - for safety?-img_0324.jpg

    I didn't crash on the Heckler very often but it did happen every year or so. On the Kona, combine the geo difference with having my first dropper and I'm riding harder, faster, and I feel like I'm less on the hairy edge in the same technical terrain I've always ridden. That being said, we all know that crashes will happen. If I'm riding harder and faster that just means my next crash is going to be epic. And that's not a good thing when you're 59. Pick your poison?
    12 Santa Cruz Heckler
    18 Kona Process 153 AL/DL (27.5)...

  73. #73
    www.ninjichor.com
    Reputation: ninjichor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    544
    Yikes, you bought that Kona Process 153 (27.5) in XL? Hope you love rear wheel, cause that front wheel is gonna come up often. xD That wheelbase will give you confidence to go mach silly... definitely is in the zone when you're charging forward, but will bite back if you suddenly get defensive. It'll let you know by letting a rock/root kick your front wheel off line, landing in a way you'll struggle to recover from if you don't have momentum and clear space to push through. One of those bikes where you wonder if the chainstays are too short or wheels too small, unless you're a member of 50:01. xD

    Well, better than the nose-heavy Heckler, in practically all ways except acceleration and general agility at lower speeds.

  74. #74
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    446
    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    What's the hold-up? We need new bike porn!
    Purely practical....nothing fun. First, I’m waiting for follow up appt to get treatment plans and find out what drug(s) I’ll be taking Xarelto or changing to something else.

    And, second, I’ve been debating btwn a few (mostly Smuggler and SB130...maybe the SC Hightower). But I do love the Firebird29 and wouldn’t mind trying the SB150 (those being the “overbiked” category). I want to see if the SB130 develops any “new frame issues” before dropping that kind of $$$$...especially when I can build a fully custom carbony goodness Smuggler or HT w/ SC wheels for the $$$ of a GX-SB. Just boring old paralysis by analysis.
    Last edited by smartyiak; 10-15-2018 at 09:14 AM. Reason: spelling

  75. #75
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    354
    For me, the key to not crashing is having the appropriate bike for the appropriate terrain, and becoming familiar with the bike and its limits. This is why I don't like having too many bikes. It confuses the muscle memory when pushing it. Harder to become "one with the bike" when you have too many bikes. I have an XC hardtail right now that I ride everywhere and pretty hard too (I'm pretty much at max heart rate whenever I ride). Only crash I've had in a year was a low speed crash trying to avoid a hiker who popped out of nowhere.

  76. #76
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MikeDee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,862
    I used to overbike, but being one year short of being officially considered a senior citizen, what I'm doing now could be considered underbiking. YMMV :-)


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  77. #77
    Barely in control
    Reputation: Schulze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    1,835
    I don't over-bike but I do over-tire a bit.

  78. #78
    Thinking about riding.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    1,505
    Quote Originally Posted by Sidewalk View Post
    I already answered that in my post, you chose to ignore it.

    The bike isn't safer, the rider is more passive.

    Put me on a DH bike, and I am not safer. I will go faster, and get bigger air than I already get with my Enduro.

    If you want to be safer, ride safer.

    See his below quote:
    So he is capable of riding safer on his current bike, but he's not capable of riding safer on a bike that's geometry and features make riding safer easier... Because then he'll ride less safe, because of the perceived safety. Am I getting that right?

    You all have lost your minds. The answer is obviously 'yes, bikes generally considered more aggressive will be safer to ride all else being equal' however you can't help but make the question far more complex than it needs to be.

Similar Threads

  1. Old O/A torch setup safety
    By nato_the_greato in forum Frame Building
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-14-2011, 06:23 PM
  2. Bicycle Equipment Safety Tips
    By Ryan G. in forum California - Norcal
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 03-26-2011, 11:19 AM
  3. Need Clear Lens / Safety Glasses Reco
    By VO2 Lax in forum Apparel and Protection
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 03-15-2011, 10:27 PM
  4. Replies: 12
    Last Post: 02-18-2011, 08:01 PM
  5. NCDOT seeks input on bicycle and pedestrian safety
    By bandit350 in forum North & South Carolina
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 01-15-2011, 06:44 PM

Members who have read this thread: 298

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2018 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.