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  1. #1
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    New Member w/ new bike (Love it but it creaks) Chromag Wideangle

    Hello- my name is Devin from Iowa- I spend a lot of time reading around here but this is my first time posting.

    I recently purchased a Chromag SLX Spec. Wideangle from JensonUSA for general trail duties (mainly around the Midwest) and goofing around with the kids. About 20 miles on it so far.

    Loving the bike but a couple creaks are bothering me. When I rock forward/rearward during a trackstand, I often get a creek that seems to be the rear brake pads shifting in the caliper. If really mash the brake lever it will not creak. I this normal on a new bike? Will it go away on its own?

    Also; I'm running new Crank Brothers Stamp 2 pedals. Another creak during slow speed riding from the pedals or bottom bracket. I would love it to be silent. Would new pedals need greased?

    Appreciate the help!

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    new pedals would need to be greased- the threads where they screw into the cranks, that is. if you installed them dry, take them back off immediately and grease them.

    who assembled the bike? was the seatpost greased? where the bolts properly tightened to the appropriate torque? common sources of creaks that come to mind are:
    dry seatpost in frame
    dry bolt threads, especially pedals
    improperly treated and torqued threads- bottom bracket, cranks, chainrings, seatpost, seatpost clamp, pedals, etc.
    dry headset cup/bearing interface

    is the bike creaking or are the brakes squeaking? if it's the latter, you need to center the caliper, true the rotors (they are not expected to be perfectly true right out of the box), face the brake posts, and bed-in (burn-in) the pads before a hard ride. if you already glazed the pads over because you ignored the bed-in procedure described in the brake manual, you need to remedy that.

    all of the above are things that the mechanic who assembled the bike should have done.

    Quote Originally Posted by fastkahrs View Post
    I would love it to be silent. Would new pedals need to be greased?
    verbs are awesome. please use them. reading that irked me. I can forgive.

  3. #3
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    Whats a verb? Is it like a noun? Or more like a pronoun?

    JensonUSA built the bike. They have a fairly thorough "BUILT. TESTED. TUNED. Bicycle Assembly QC and Pre-Delivery Checklist" that was performed. The rear brake creaks, does NOT squeak. I see there is some movement of the pads in the caliper when I apply and rock, is this normal?

    Will grease the pedals, thanks!

  4. #4
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    Warning: All of this is incredibly hard to diagnose over the internet! A live, skilled mechanic who can look at the bike in person would be 100 times better at this.

    Pads moving in the caliper sounds normal. If they make noise, there are half a dozen or more things you need to do with the system.

    Can you make a video with that sound?

    If the bike came to you in a box, no matter what marketing drivel Jenson puts out, it needs a final once- over by a mechanic. I have built dozens of bikes that were already "professionally assembled" somewhere else before coming to the bike shop. My process took over one hour per bike. The same may be true with your bike.

  5. #5
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    okay
    Last edited by tealy; 10-27-2018 at 08:14 AM.
    "You can be clipped in and be boring or ride flats and have a good time." - Sam Hill

  6. #6
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    I'm sitting on the seat rocking bike forward/backward.

    https://youtu.be/PiX6P5XdvTA

  7. #7
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    does it do that when you're riding? are you holding the brake while you rock it or does it just do that regardless of braking?

    if you're holding the brake, that sounds like the pads are not really biting. that's a sign that the pads are contaminated and/ or they were not bedded in with the rotors properly.

    could also be improperly torqued bolts on the seatpost, the clamp, caliper bolts, rotor, axle, or a dry seatpost. could be spoke tension, as 99% of the bikes that I built have wheels that are under-tensioned after the rim has been de-stressed and a tire installed.

  8. #8
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    Yes, I'm holding the brake. I can see the pads shifting forward/rearward in the caliper. The pads are grabbing securely on the disc. Pads do not feel contaminated, they will lock up using one finger. I have previously torqued caliper & adapter bolts. If I pull real hard the pads won't shift and that noise is not there.

    I seem to remember using a product like this back when I use to do my brake jobs at the caliper/pad mating surface. https://www.amazon.com/Permatex-8007.../dp/B000HBNUFY - anything ever applied to the back of bike brake pads?

  9. #9
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    I would not use that product on your mountain bike brakes.

    it might be hard to see, but if the rotor is slipping between the pads at all, that noise is the sound of a slightly contaminated rotor/ pad losing it's bite. that's what it sounds like to me, but I am sure seeing it in person is a totally different story.

    when I ask about "torquing" bolts, I mean using a calibrated torque wrench to tighten each bolt to the appropriate torque, as prescribed by the manufacturer or general bolt specs. most people think this is overkill, but I use a torque wrench 90% of the time on every bolt that I touch on my own bike, moreso when I worked on other people's bikes in the shop. noises like that usually come from bolts that have not been tightened enough, but it's not hard to over-tighten some bolts and cause more damage.

    otherwise, it could be a TON of different things. did you grease the rear hub thru-axle shaft and threads? did you check it for grease?

  10. #10
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    This thread seems to cover the same topic: http://forums.mtbr.com/brake-time/xt...ng-814826.html

    It appears the pad fixing bolt from an XT should fit my SLX and may partially improve the noise. https://www.jensonusa.com/Shimano-XT...BoCuVAQAvD_BwE

    Ill see if local shop has these on hand..

  11. #11
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    good find. I have that silly cotter pin thing on my SLX brakes and they don't make that noise though. I have been meaning to replace that part with a nicer Shimano pad axle but it's just not urgent. let us know how that works.

  12. #12
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    Local shop tech said that noise is extremely common and no way to make it stop. Humm.. They did not have the pin in stock but he happily ordered me a few; supposed to have them for me tomorrow.

  13. #13
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    if holding the brake and rocking the bike back and forth is the only source of noises, that's fine. how often do you expect that noise to be a problem when riding?

  14. #14
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    I spend a lot of time tooling around the driveway/block with my young boys. Very basic, trials maneuvers on curbs, small stair sections, boulders, etc.. We'll see what this pad axle does for it.

    My 15' Rockhopper comp 29 is dead quiet.

    It just sounds like something is about to fly off.

  15. #15
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    Does your rear wheel have a quick release on it? If so, it's possible your rear brake creak is actually your QR lever. A drop of 3-in-1 on the cam will usually quiet it.
    Why Johnny Ringo, you look like someone just walked over your grave.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    Does your rear wheel have a quick release on it? If so, it's possible your rear brake creak is actually your QR lever. A drop of 3-in-1 on the cam will usually quiet it.
    No, its a standard maxle. It is however dry, Ill put a little grease front and rear there as well.

  17. #17
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    minor point- I would not use 3-in1 oil. some people swear it's fine. probably better than nothing. the cam might need a drop of Triflow once in a while, but my concern would be the dry threads and dry dropout/axle interface, which need a thin coat of grease.

    that makes me wonder what else they forgot to grease. I quickly lost count of the number of bicycles I built that had bone-dry threaded BB interfaces. yes, I pulled the cranks and BB off of every bike I built and checked.

  18. #18
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    ^^ I actually like Tri-Flow better, too.
    Why Johnny Ringo, you look like someone just walked over your grave.

  19. #19
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    While preparing for my pad axle I inspected the rear caliper. Unfortunately the SLX BR-M6000 brakes do not have a threaded axle hole so the Shimano XT part I ordered will not work with my calipers. The cotter key hole in the brake pads is a fair bit larger than the caliper hole which is allowing pad movement. Back to the drawing board.

  20. #20
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    This may be ill advised but figured it was worth the risk...

    New Member w/ new bike (Love it but it creaks) Chromag Wideangle-img_20180704_022428900.jpgNew Member w/ new bike (Love it but it creaks) Chromag Wideangle-img_20180704_022913035.jpg

    A dab of JB Kwick on two edges of the pad. After cured I sanded until it fit with minimal play to allow for proper pad movement. Nice and quiet now. JB Kwick has a 300* F working limit... Not sure what pads typically see but I haven't exceeded that in my 20 miles of use so far.

    Now that I know it works, I'd use JB Weld next time for 500* F working temps.

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