Is my riding position good?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Is my riding position good?

    I felt cramped on my 17" Hardrock so I decided my new bike would be a size 19" so that I can be a bit more stretched out without using a long stem, but now I'm thinking that may not have been the best decision.... It feels fine on the road, but could there be any problems when I decide to finally go try some easy trails?

    https://i59.tinypic.com/2dtd3mc.jpg

  2. #2
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    Your seat looks too high in that pic, hard to tell for sure though because you have no shoes on. That doesn't necessarily mean the frame is a bad fit.

  3. #3
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    Thanks.

    When I get my shoes on, the saddle is fine. I just ride alone so there's nobody to take photos of me when I'm all dressed up.

    I also only have 17 cm of exposed seatpost and barely any standover clearance (though I do have some), is that fine too?

    I originally wanted to use a 50 mm stem, I need to try that as well (BTW I'll need to sort out the Hardrock as well, but to get a reach equivalent to this bike with the current stem, I'd need a >120 mm one - that's what I don't like, I rode a bike with a 110 mm stem on it for a while and felt so weird...).

  4. #4
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    Yeah. Put some shoes on. Also put on some shorts so we can see how your legs are bent. Particularly wear whatever you wear when you ride. The baggy sweatshirt makes it difficult to see the positioning of your upper body, also.

    The frame size generally looks okay at this point, but it's impossible to tell any of the finer details like seat height.

  5. #5
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    When the pedal is at the 6 o'clock position, my leg is slightly bent, that's the way it's supposed to be, right?

    AFAIK saddle too high = rocking side-to-side while pedaling (struggling to reach the pedals) - that's not my problem. I can pedal for over an hour without any problems (haven't done a longer ride yet).

    I'll try to get a better photo but I'm not sure how long it's going to take.

  6. #6
    thecentralscrutinizer
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    Your position looks okay, but the important thing is that you are comfortable and that you have the balance you need on the bike.
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  7. #7
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    Don't worry much about standover clearance. In most cases, the few seconds you are actually standing over bike, it will be leaning to one side or the other. As long as you can touch the ground with both feet (even if it's on your toes), you're fine.

    My main bike, a 26" FS, has a good 1"+ of standover. My 29er HT SS has none...meaning I'm "on" the top tube when standing over the bike. I've never had any trouble with either.

  8. #8
    B.Ike
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    that bike doesn't look too small for you.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by praivo View Post
    When the pedal is at the 6 o'clock position, my leg is slightly bent, that's the way it's supposed to be, right?

    AFAIK saddle too high = rocking side-to-side while pedaling (struggling to reach the pedals) - that's not my problem. I can pedal for over an hour without any problems (haven't done a longer ride yet).

    I'll try to get a better photo but I'm not sure how long it's going to take.
    Usually you see if your heel can touch the pedal at 6 o'clock. They say you shouldn't be able to raise off the seat. Personally I like to go about 3/4-1" lower than that position.

  10. #10
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    I poached your image and lightened it.

    The size looks fine. You may find that you need to become accustomed to a different feel as you had adapted to your smaller frame as "normal." Give it 5-10 rides. Looks like you have some spacers on top of the stem to play with for a bit more upright position and then you might look at a shorter stem if need be.

    All-in-all, though, you have great start.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Is my riding position good?-2dtd3mc.jpg  

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  11. #11
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    Looks like a good fit to me.. had to see where you were from since maxbike is a brand i've never heard of. Czech Republic? Jaromir Jagr, Patrick Elias.. some of my favorite hockey players
    Last edited by crewjones; 03-07-2015 at 10:11 AM.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkeley Mike View Post
    I poached your image and lightened it.

    The size looks fine. You may find that you need to become accustomed to a different feel as you had adapted to your smaller frame as "normal." Give it 5-10 rides. Looks like you have some spacers on top of the stem to play with for a bit more upright position and then you might look at a shorter stem if need be.

    All-in-all, though, you have great start.
    I've already done way more than that, the bike now has about 750 km on it, but never in any "good" terrain. So I did know it feels okay on the road but wanted to know if there's something that could cause me problems when I finally decide to go off the road.

    Quote Originally Posted by crewjones View Post
    Looks like a good fit to me.. had to see where you were from since maxbike is a brand i've never heard of. Czech Republic? Jamir Jagr, Patrick Elias.. some of my favorite hockey players
    Yeah. And Remerx (rims), Rubena (tires), Force (various components), and some more bike makers like Leader Fox, Author, Olpran (BSO) etc.

    When I went into a LBS for a shorter stem, the guy immediately said something like "You're an idiot, why spend $1k for this when you could have a Rockhopper with lifetime warranty for the frame, 2 drivetrain, tapered head tube, 29" wheels..." But the reason I bought this bike is that it has some nice components on it (all-SLX except deore crankset and brakes) and it's a 650b (I originally wanted a 26" but then I thought this will be more "future-proof"). I'm not rich so I prefer a frame without lifetime warranty to the need to change low-end components after a few hundred kilometers (the rear derailer on my Hardrock lasted less than 1.000 km, both rims went badly out of true after I went OTB when my front wheel got stuck in some gravel at about 30 km/h etc.).

    And they also make some nice frames - but that one is about $100 more expensive and I didn't have that much money - and next time I buy a bike, it will probably use through-axles, so if they don't make a TA frame before that, I'll have to choose another brand. But maybe I will do a frame swap on this bike at some point because I really like the other frame.

  13. #13
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    Looks like your seat is a little high to me as well.

  14. #14
    B.Ike
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    Quote Originally Posted by praivo View Post
    I've already done way more than that, the bike now has about 750 km on it, but never in any "good" terrain. So I did know it feels okay on the road but wanted to know if there's something that could cause me problems when I finally decide to go off the road.

    Yeah. And Remerx (rims), Rubena (tires), Force (various components), and some more bike makers like Leader Fox, Author, Olpran (BSO) etc.

    When I went into a LBS for a shorter stem, the guy immediately said something like "You're an idiot, why spend $1k for this when you could have a Rockhopper with lifetime warranty for the frame, 2 drivetrain, tapered head tube, 29" wheels..." But the reason I bought this bike is that it has some nice components on it (all-SLX except deore crankset and brakes) and it's a 650b (I originally wanted a 26" but then I thought this will be more "future-proof"). I'm not rich so I prefer a frame without lifetime warranty to the need to change low-end components after a few hundred kilometers (the rear derailer on my Hardrock lasted less than 1.000 km, both rims went badly out of true after I went OTB when my front wheel got stuck in some gravel at about 30 km/h etc.).

    And they also make some nice frames - but that one is about $100 more expensive and I didn't have that much money - and next time I buy a bike, it will probably use through-axles, so if they don't make a TA frame before that, I'll have to choose another brand. But maybe I will do a frame swap on this bike at some point because I really like the other frame.
    I would never patronize a lbs that made me feel like an idiot much less one that called me one. slx/deore are great components made to last. f..k that lbs and find yourself a new one.

  15. #15
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    There's two more there (though I only go to one yet). He didn't really call me an idiot, but when I asked him how much would bleeding my brakes cost, he rode the bike down the street and back, said that my brakes were fine (they were NOT) and that he was afraid the frame would break with him on it (he doesn't look much heavier than me). Then he said I should have bought a "big S" because of the lifetime warranty on the frame. "Low-end components? Just change them when they break."

    But he did sell me a new stem for 100 Kč (about $10)...

  16. #16
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    If you still feel a bit uncomfortable, try lowering your seat a little more, even some more than everyone said. That way, you might get a better posture, and moreover improved control while standing. Still, you should not make it too low since it may bring uncomfortable pedaling or knee injury.

  17. #17
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    The LBS guy sounds like a male specific sex organ. I wouldn't give them another penny (or whatever denomination) of my money.

    The bike fit looks ok 'cept for a couple of minor adjustments, seat height and maybe a bit of stem length based on your preference. You might also get a bit more upright by twisting your brake levers back just a hair. Hard to tell with the long sleeves, but looks like your wrists are on the verge of rolling forward over the bar.
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