Mtn biker looking for his first road bike- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1

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    Mtn biker looking for his first road bike

    Hi,

    This is my first post here, and I'm sure this question has been asked plenty of times before. I have been mountain biking for about 2 years now, and I'm loving it. Anyway, last summer, I decided to try road biking out with a local club, but I used my mountain bike with slicks. Needless to say, I did finish the ride, but 50 miles with roadies on a mountain bike was one of the most miserable experiences of my life.

    This summer, I'd like to get back out there with the club and do more riding on the road, as well as do some road training for my mountain biking. I'd like to get a bike around $1000, and I was looking specifically at the Giant OCR1. I'm a lightweight rider, about 145 lbs, so I don't need a real beefy frame. Right now I ride a Giant XTC, and it works really well for me. Are there any other recommendations at this price point? I have a real problem with spending money upgrading this and that, so I'm trying to get a bike that has decent components to start with (i.e. ultegra on the OCR1).

    Any suggestions would be appreciated, thanks!

  2. #2
    paintbucket
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    At a grand you can get a solid ride that will do its job. But the fit of a road bike is everything so don't even begin to narrow your choices until you've ridden every bike in your price range you can. Then pick the one that feels the best. If you've got a shop that you already like, thats the place to start. But still check out the competition before plunking down your hard earned cash.
    When the going gets weird its bedtime.

  3. #3
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    supergo has good deals on ultegra bikes

    Quote Originally Posted by VT_Hokie
    Hi,

    This is my first post here, and I'm sure this question has been asked plenty of times before. I have been mountain biking for about 2 years now, and I'm loving it. Anyway, last summer, I decided to try road biking out with a local club, but I used my mountain bike with slicks. Needless to say, I did finish the ride, but 50 miles with roadies on a mountain bike was one of the most miserable experiences of my life.

    This summer, I'd like to get back out there with the club and do more riding on the road, as well as do some road training for my mountain biking. I'd like to get a bike around $1000, and I was looking specifically at the Giant OCR1. I'm a lightweight rider, about 145 lbs, so I don't need a real beefy frame. Right now I ride a Giant XTC, and it works really well for me. Are there any other recommendations at this price point? I have a real problem with spending money upgrading this and that, so I'm trying to get a bike that has decent components to start with (i.e. ultegra on the OCR1).

    Any suggestions would be appreciated, thanks!
    sure they are "after market" frames made in Taiwan but Taiwain makes some decent frames.

  4. #4
    "Mr. Britannica"
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    If you can find a full ultegra-equipped bike for $1000, buy it. More than likely you'll get 105 (at best) at that price point. Remember to factor in pedals, shoes, and any other doo-dads that the shop might or might not throw in for free (cages, bottles, seat pack, pump and/or CO2, etc). And don't be afraid to consider a used bike either.

  5. #5
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    Scattante 2003 CFR Carbon w/ Double Ultegra

    is going for 1250, an excellent buy in my opinion. HTe frame is monocoque carbon (martec in taiwan) and an excellent ride.
    Go for it.

  6. #6
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    Just chiming in to say, there's no shame in using 105. It's very good equipment. I have over 10,000 miles on shifters and a rear derailleur and they're going strong. Chain and Cassette are gonna wear out anyway, so don't worry about those. I race on Dura Ace, which is great stuff, but not functionally much more impressive than 105 or Ultegra. You'll probably have a lot more choices looking for a bike by including 105, so I'm just saying don't be afraid of it. It won't slow you down and it's durable stuff, it's just a little heavier and uglier than the higher groups. And like roadiegonebad said, don't forget to factor in accessories. They should easily run you a few hundred. Sorry to break it to you, but when you hit the road this hobby gets twice as expensive. But it means you will probably ride twice as much too, and that is twice as good.

  7. #7
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    But those Scattante carbon are butt ugly! And the name?

  8. #8
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    If it's your first road bike spend some time getting a good fit. I often recommend used in that price range because you can get some very good and well equipped used bikes. However, used is not always a good idea for a first time road bike because you need to know what you want and what fits. Colorado Cyclist, among others, has good fit instructions. Take some time to measure. Go to a good bike shop that carrys several brands of road bikes and talk to them. You might even consider paying for a fitting. Correct frame size is much more important on a road bike because you spend alot of time in basically the same position. You better be comfortable or you'll be miserable. It's alot more important than which group you get (105 or Ultegra). You'll be tired of the color before you wear out either group and both will perform about the same. If you want to buy mail order check out GVHbikes.com. Gary Hobbs has a great selection of frames and very good prices. He'll spend alot of time with you on the phone making sure you're well taken care of.

  9. #9
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    If you can afford a little more check out the Giant OCR Elite. I noticed they cut the price quite a bit this year. The big deal with the Giant OCR Elite is the relaxed geometry, Giant has raised the head tube about an inch on the Elite bike. I checked a lot of bikes out before settling on the Elite. The only other bike I was comfortable on was the Lemond bikes, they also have a little more relaxed geometry.

  10. #10
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    great idea...

    did the same recently... mountain biking for almost 15 years, started doing more road biking this past year with a used cannondale R600 triple/rsx componentry (bottom of the line) i got off ebay for $550, upgraded the wheels to ultegra/mavic open for $130 for some speedier trainign wheels.

    it's been fantastic. i ride more because no more driving to the trails and squeeze in a mornign ride 2x/week. makes my weekend mountain bikes so much better and i've gotten back down to my college weight.

    have fun. $1000 is plenty for a first road bike. you can always upgrade components or to a new bike if you decide to get into it. i use the same pedals so i can use the same shoes on both.

    john

  11. #11
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    Check out Specialized's Allez lineup. I have an Allez Comp Cro-mo and my gf has the Allez sport 27. Both are incredible deals in that you get a whole lot of bike for the money. Maybe check out the Allez Elite model. It's all 105, which like the others have stated is a good group, and it lists for just a little over 1k, but you can get it for a couple hundred less usually. Don't be afraid to go over to www.roadbikereview.com and ask for their advice. There's even a "what bike to buy" forum, you should check it out. And look at the reviews of some of the bikes you're considering. Good luck in your shopping endevours!

  12. #12
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    i bought my road bike from an online shop owned by a great guy who retired from business, got into building road bikes and turned it into a business. he's very knowledgeable, has a great selection of frames/components and (at least for me) was very helpful in going through fitment issues over the phone. not the same as in person but i would highly recommend checking him out.

    i bought a new raleigh r700 from him about 18 months ago, he was running a special and the bike (full ultegra, shimano r535 wheelset) was $1k...

    www.gvhbikes.com

    owner is gary hobbs...

  13. #13
    Birdman aka JMJ
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    How about these?

    Quote Originally Posted by VT_Hokie
    Hi,

    This is my first post here, and I'm sure this question has been asked plenty of times before. I have been mountain biking for about 2 years now, and I'm loving it. Anyway, last summer, I decided to try road biking out with a local club, but I used my mountain bike with slicks. Needless to say, I did finish the ride, but 50 miles with roadies on a mountain bike was one of the most miserable experiences of my life.

    This summer, I'd like to get back out there with the club and do more riding on the road, as well as do some road training for my mountain biking. I'd like to get a bike around $1000, and I was looking specifically at the Giant OCR1. I'm a lightweight rider, about 145 lbs, so I don't need a real beefy frame. Right now I ride a Giant XTC, and it works really well for me. Are there any other recommendations at this price point? I have a real problem with spending money upgrading this and that, so I'm trying to get a bike that has decent components to start with (i.e. ultegra on the OCR1).

    Any suggestions would be appreciated, thanks!
    Bianchi Imola (cromoly)
    Specialized Allez Elite (cromoly)

    Shimao 105 for the most part, about $1000, smooth riding steel frames, carbon forks.

    I just bought an Allez, and my wife acquired an Ultegra-equipped Bianchi Vigorelli last year.

    JMJ

  14. #14

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    thanks everyone for your replies.

    i went to my LBS and checked out some bikes. they had a 03 Fuji Roubaix Pro on sale for a little under $1K. Since it was pouring down rain when i got there, i didn't get a chance to ride it. i'll go back there tomorrow and see it again. reynolds 853 steel frame with 105 components, it seems like a pretty decent deal.

    also, going on a little tangent, the bike does not come with pedals. i ride eggbeaters on my MTB, and i was wondering which pedals would work well to start out on.

    thanks again.

  15. #15
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    Eggbeaters

    Quote Originally Posted by VT_Hokie
    thanks everyone for your replies.

    i went to my LBS and checked out some bikes. they had a 03 Fuji Roubaix Pro on sale for a little under $1K. Since it was pouring down rain when i got there, i didn't get a chance to ride it. i'll go back there tomorrow and see it again. reynolds 853 steel frame with 105 components, it seems like a pretty decent deal.

    also, going on a little tangent, the bike does not come with pedals. i ride eggbeaters on my MTB, and i was wondering which pedals would work well to start out on.

    thanks again.
    I'm no roadie, just a bit of common sense here. If you shell out $60 for a new set of eggs for the road bike, you'll save yourself the $100 you'd have spent on new shoes.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by upNdown
    I'm no roadie, just a bit of common sense here. If you shell out $60 for a new set of eggs for the road bike, you'll save yourself the $100 you'd have spent on new shoes.

    i was definitely contemplating that, but i was unsure whether i should get a pair of road shoes with stiffer soles and a pedal with, well, a little more pedaling area...i've heard of people road biking with eggs, anyone else have any thoughts?

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by upNdown
    I'm no roadie, just a bit of common sense here. If you shell out $60 for a new set of eggs for the road bike, you'll save yourself the $100 you'd have spent on new shoes.
    True, initially....I used to road bike with mountain shoes and pedals and it worked fine for a while. As I got more into road biking and was riding longer distances, it began to get uncomfortable, I would get kinda "hot spots" and my feet would feel really tired. Just this spring I finally got some proper road pedals and WOW what a difference! I am using LOOK pedals and they have a large contact area that eliminates hot spots and makes it much more comfortable. I also feel a lot more stable when I'm standing up climbing now. Just my 2cents.

    By the way the 03 Fuji Roubaix Pro is a fine bike. I would have bought one from my LBS this year but they didn't have any to fit me and couldn't get one from thier supplier. Oh well I'm happy with the bike I ended up with. For less than $1k I'd say that it's a great deal.

  18. #18
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    Nothing wrong with going with Eggs to start with. As you put in more road miles you'll find out whether they'll work over the long haul for you. Some people get hot spots with small platform pedals like Eggs while others don't. What kind of shoes do you have? Many top of the line MTB shoes are virtually as stiff as good road shoes. I'd try some Eggs and see what happens. As for myself, I like road specific pedals and shoes. I've tried many including Shimano and their clones, Looks and Keywin. The best I've found are what I ride now, Time Impacts. Good sized platform. Easy in and out while offering secure retention. Good float. No squeak like Looks. Fairly light. Best of all the cleats have rubber bumpers which are replaceable. They protect the cleat and make walking secure, but still awkward. All in all the best road pedal I've ever owned.

  19. #19
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    Whoa, whats with the Shimano link?

    Quote Originally Posted by meloh1
    Nothing wrong with going with Eggs to start with. As you put in more road miles you'll find out whether they'll work over the long haul for you. Some people get hot spots with small platform pedals like Eggs while others don't. What kind of shoes do you have? Many top of the line MTB shoes are virtually as stiff as good road shoes. I'd try some Eggs and see what happens. As for myself, I like road specific pedals and shoes. I've tried many including Shimano and their clones, Looks and Keywin. The best I've found are what I ride now, Time Impacts. Good sized platform. Easy in and out while offering secure retention. Good float. No squeak like Looks. Fairly light. Best of all the cleats have rubber bumpers which are replaceable. They protect the cleat and make walking secure, but still awkward. All in all the best road pedal I've ever owned.
    I didn't put that in. Looks like MTBR is doing a little promo with Jenson. Don't know if I care for being used to advertise for companies with plenty of advertising dollars of their own. This implies I'm endorsing these companies when I'm not. Pretty sneaky if you ask me.

  20. #20
    paintbucket
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    I run EBs on my roadie all winter long, mostly because I don't have room for socks in my road shoes. The EBs don't cause me any problems at all. Go for it to start, and see how they feel.
    When the going gets weird its bedtime.

  21. #21
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    I would ride the same pedals as the MTB bike

    Quote Originally Posted by VT_Hokie
    thanks everyone for your replies.

    i went to my LBS and checked out some bikes. they had a 03 Fuji Roubaix Pro on sale for a little under $1K. Since it was pouring down rain when i got there, i didn't get a chance to ride it. i'll go back there tomorrow and see it again. reynolds 853 steel frame with 105 components, it seems like a pretty decent deal.

    also, going on a little tangent, the bike does not come with pedals. i ride eggbeaters on my MTB, and i was wondering which pedals would work well to start out on.

    thanks again.
    You'll notice a little more slop on the road with MTB pedals but I've just swticed my road bike pedals back to MTB Shimano 515 pedals, the road bike pedals (Ultegra) & shoes (Nike) have less float and I can't adjust the funky cleat where it needs to be on the shoe, yeah I wasted 170.00 on road shoes and pedals but proper ergonimics and knee health are the most important thing.

  22. #22

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    I just bought a Specialized Allez Sport, 750, but then added another $100 for pedals. I went with mountain pedals, Shimano M-540's, so I wouldn't have to buy another pair of shoes. By the time you add tax, as well as spare tubes and "stuff," you'll get out the door for just under $1,000. There are a number of bikes in this price range, however, so look around. I selected the bike as much by the service at the store as by the bike itself.

  23. #23
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    Check out Candys

    Even better than Eggbeaters are Candys by Crank Brothers. The platform makes a big difference in eliminating hotspots and giving you more stability on the road. They use the identical cleat, so you can use the same shoes. I use them on my cyclocross bike, which I ride 5 to 6,000 miles a year, mostly on the road. My rides average somewhere around 2 1/2 hours and I have no problems with foot pain or the bars digging into the sole of the shoe. I have Eggbeaters too on one of my mountain bikes, trust me, the Candys work a lot better on the road. They have a little slop and movement because of the small cleat, but unless you are racing that shouldn't be a problem. Large platform road pedals are ideal, but then you have to buy another pair of shoes and learn how to flip the pedal over at stops, it can be more trouble than it sounds like.

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