• 06-29-2016
    Procter
    Mountain biker killed by bear @ Glacier
    Requiescat en pace. Be safe out there, especially you northerners.

    Grizzly bear kills mountain biker - Local/Montana - Mobile Adv
  • 06-29-2016
    DIRTJUNKIE
    Wow very sad. Prayers and thoughts with family and friends. He may be a mtbr regular.

    R.I.P. Brad
  • 06-29-2016
    nvphatty
    RIP Brad Treat.
  • 06-29-2016
    HPIguy
    Damn, that's brutal. RIP Brad
  • 06-29-2016
    Nat
    Noooooooo. That's so awful. Very sad.
  • 06-29-2016
    rockcrusher
    RIP, sad scary.

    sent
  • 06-29-2016
    jcd46
    Terrible stuff, RIP
  • 06-30-2016
    Finch Platte
    I recently rode around Downieville, lots of rides by myself, and bears were always in the back of my mind. Never saw one, but I'm sure they saw me. Some riders did see a bear while I was there: Downieville Gathering is almost here. June 24-26 - Page 4- Mtbr.com

    RIP.
  • 06-30-2016
    LyNx
    That is very sad and scary, but have to ask, as a person who worked for Fish & Wildlife, how do you manage to startle a bear? I'd assume he would have had on a bear bell on his bike and known the area has bears and to make sure and keep lots of noise on the trail, for just such a reason.
  • 06-30-2016
    evasive
    I didn't know him, but I see on FB that we have some mutual friends. Montana isn't that large a community. Tragic. I don't know if he had a bear bell on his bike or not, but many of the people I know who regularly ride in griz country don't have them. They're careful to make noise regularly, but a constantly clanking bear bell is damn obnoxious. More people use a commuter bell, and chime it regularly. Even with a bell, it's pretty easy to startle a bear on a bike. Dense vegetation, sounds of running water, etc. can all mask the sounds, and unless you're climbing, closing speeds put you on them in a hurry.

    There are black bears, mountain lions and wolves in my home area, but grizzlies are effectively absent (although DNA on fur snags shows they pass through). I don't give them a second thought. But when I ride in griz country, it's in a group, and we talk and make noise regularly. Landscape and vegetation inform how loudly or frequently.
  • 06-30-2016
    fc
    4 Attachment(s)
    I wrote a story on it and found some video.

    Grizzly bear kills mountain biker Brad Treat in Montana - Mtbr.com
  • 06-30-2016
    Brodino
    Very sad.

    RIP Brad
  • 06-30-2016
    Cleared2land
    Perhaps the good side of this sad story is its ability to raise our awareness and allow us to review some of our possible complacencies when we ride where these threats exist.
  • 06-30-2016
    Engineer90
    As sad as this was, I really hope they don't put that bear down. We all need to be careful with bears.

    RIP Brad
  • 06-30-2016
    ColinL
    RIP :(

    I would think it's easy to surprise an animal on a MTB because you're often going much faster than an animal walks, especially if you're pointed downhill.

    I'm leaving for vacation in Colorado in one week and we ride singletrack all around the Breckenridge area, plus the lifts at Vail and Keystone. We do it annually, and a year or two ago we saw a pair of juvenile bears running in the open at Keystone, basically across a green ski run. We have friends in Frisco that see bears in town multiple times a year. So, they're out there.

    Waiting for someone's "what's in your hydration pack" thread post to include a .357 magnum...
  • 06-30-2016
    targnik
    Ride In Paradise Brad...

    -----------------------------------------------------------
    Damage: 14' Kona Process 134, 12' Transition Bandit 29er
  • 06-30-2016
    tim208
    The bears have made a comeback big time, time to delist them off of the endangered species list.

    RIP Brad
  • 06-30-2016
    DIRTJUNKIE
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by evasive View Post
    I didn't know him, but I see on FB that we have some mutual friends. Montana isn't that large a community. Tragic. I don't know if he had a bear bell on his bike or not, but many of the people I know who regularly ride in griz country don't have them. They're careful to make noise regularly, but a constantly clanking bear bell is damn obnoxious. More people use a commuter bell, and chime it regularly. Even with a bell, it's pretty easy to startle a bear on a bike. Dense vegetation, sounds of running water, etc. can all mask the sounds, and unless you're climbing, closing speeds put you on them in a hurry.

    There are black bears, mountain lions and wolves in my home area, but grizzlies are effectively absent (although DNA on fur snags shows they pass through). I don't give them a second thought. But when I ride in griz country, it's in a group, and we talk and make noise regularly. Landscape and vegetation inform how loudly or frequently.

    Nice to put it in perspective. Few realize how easy it is to surprise a Griz. Black Bears and Mountain Lions are a completely different scenario. They run from any noise and avoid humans. Griz not so much. They take anything situational as a threat and turn when startled.

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by fc View Post
    I wrote a story on it and found some video.

    Grizzly bear kills mountain biker Brad Treat in Montana - Mtbr.com

    Great job on that. :thumbsup:

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    Perhaps the good side of this sad story is its ability to raise our awareness and allow us to review some of our possible complacencies when we ride where these threats exist.

    We all need to learn what threats are in the area we are riding in and be fully alert at all times. Especially in Griz country.

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ColinL View Post
    I would think it's easy to surprise an animal on a MTB because you're often going much faster than an animal walks, especially if you're pointed downhill.

    I'm leaving for vacation in Colorado in one week and we ride singletrack all around the Breckenridge area, plus the lifts at Vail and Keystone. We do it annually, and a year or two ago we saw a pair of juvenile bears running in the open at Keystone, basically across a green ski run. We have friends in Frisco that see bears in town multiple times a year. So, they're out there.

    Waiting for someone's "what's in your hydration pack" thread post to include a .357 magnum...

    Black Bears are hardly a threat to humans even in a surprise scenario. They run away instead of standing their ground. Of course there are always those that don't. Best to be on guard no matter, just to be safe. Where there are Black Bears there are most likely mountain lions. Both are are a distant threat compared to a Griz.


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tim208 View Post
    The bears have made a comeback big time, time to delist them off of the endangered species list.

    RIP Brad

    Not!

    Just because a few unfortunate human encounters does not warrant them removed from the endangere species list.

    R.I.P. Brad

    I can almost guarantee Brad having worked for the Fish and Game would agree.
  • 06-30-2016
    jcd46
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tim208 View Post
    The bears have made a comeback big time, time to delist them off of the endangered species list.

    RIP Brad

    Don't forget we are in their territory.
  • 06-30-2016
    Cleared2land
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    Don't forget we are in their territory.

    Bingo!
  • 06-30-2016
    tim208
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    Don't forget we are in their territory.

    yea, we always have been and always will be, but that does not mean that the endgangered species act has worked and the bears are no longer endgangered.

    I am not saying go kill the bears, just celebrate the fact the ESA has worked and remove the grizzlies from it. Same as the wolf, the ESA worked and it took to long to remove them from the esa. Don't confuse removal as wanting to kill them all.
  • 06-30-2016
    tim208
    I personally think it is awesome we have all the big predators. I am waiting on the trail dog getting killed by wolfs on a bike ride headline.
  • 06-30-2016
    DIRTJUNKIE
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tim208 View Post
    yea, we always have been and always will be, but that does not mean that the endgangered species act has worked and the bears are no longer endgangered.

    I am not saying go kill the bears, just celebrate the fact the ESA has worked and remove the grizzlies from it. Same as the wolf, the ESA worked and it took to long to remove them from the esa. Don't confuse removal as wanting to kill them all.

    I think that decision is made by Fish and Game and statistics. Just because an outsider looking in thinks it's time doesn't mean it's time. There is a lot more to it than an unfortunate human encounter or two.

    Grizzly Bears once ranged almost the entire lower 48. Very few pockets remain in the northern U.S.A. We as humans need to know what dangers are in the wild areas we enter. Unfortunately these attacks happen and often are unavoidable but we are encroaching upon their territory. What constitutes taking them off the endangered species list? Because they have populated some very small pockets of the north. I don't think that constitutes this descion at all.
  • 06-30-2016
    tim208
    I would like to see them removed so people living where the bears are can live and not live in fear for protecting there lives or the lives of there family members.
    A guy killed one in his yard, where his kids where just playing minutes earlier. It took the governor of Idaho to step in so the guy would not go to jail. It is not always about hunting, but allowing people to protect themselves with out fear of going to jail. I would love to drop some of the big predators off in all the big cities and see how people react. But that is me.
  • 06-30-2016
    tim208
    I also need to state, that I have been bluff charged by a sow grizzly with cubs and have thrown rocks at grizzlies to get them out of my camp. I have also watched in fascination as this one griz layed on the moose it had decided it was dinner. I have done first aid on a guy that got between a sow griz and cubs. I have startled them on trails while on my bike. They are very cool animals, that need to be respected. But they have also made a huge comeback in the last 20 years.
  • 06-30-2016
    jcd46
    ^^ Back to DJ's point "invasion" you can't move to an area that has dangerous animal population and expect not to have tragedies. Just because Joe wanted to build a house along the hills for his perfect view doesn't mean he doesn't need to respect and take all precautions to protect his family. Food, Trash is what attracts these animals closer to humans and the animals don't know any better, they are also protecting themselves.

    I used to camp quite a bit overnights in the Sierras, Los Padres you name it, even the desert that has its own dangers. If you get into the woods, you can expect anything to happen. Anyways this thread was for a fallen rider and should be back to that.
  • 06-30-2016
    tim208
    As far as living with the animals. Are you folks referring to there historical home range or todays home range. What if you bought your house 10 years ago and there where no bears around and now the bears(or any species) have come back. Maybe it was due to human intervention(relocating of species) maybe it was because there population is just growing. What about that? Alot of animals have made humumgous rebounds and are in places they have not been for decades. Should joe blow not be able to protect himself or worse yet be locked out of land he has roamed for his entire life because the animal has made a come back?

    alot of us where here before the animals.
  • 06-30-2016
    DIRTJUNKIE
    Obviously there's different opinions on this. Let's keep this thread a tribute to a lost comrade and not a political endless black hole.
  • 06-30-2016
    BumpityBump
    RIP Brad, that sucks. Also, nice post by evasive, you were more succinct and tactful toward the armchair quarterbacking than I would have been.
  • 06-30-2016
    tim208
    sorry for the derailment, out of respect for brads family i won't talk about bear delisting.
  • 06-30-2016
    John Kuhl
    RIP Brad.
  • 06-30-2016
    Shark
    Rip, sad incident for sure.
  • 06-30-2016
    Jayem
    Saw 8 black bears out on trails about a month ago within a 2-week time-span. Several of them I came upon while riding. We all ride with loud bells here though, so they didn't seem "surprised", in some cases, they were already running away when I came around the corner. In another case, they were coming up the trail (but slow enough I was able to do an emergency stop and turn around). In the strangest one, I passed within about 10-15 feet of a mother and cub that had decided to just "freeze" and pretend/hope that I couldn't see them standing there, as I passed at a moderate speed. We all ride with bear-spray too. We have brown bears too, but there are not as common.
  • 07-01-2016
    Engineer90
    There were black bears hanging out around the hotel I was staying at in NH. Didn't see one on the trails, but in the Hotel parking lot, we saw 2. They paid no attention to me or my wife. The youngest walked about 6 feet from me and looked at me but walked away. The bigger one got about 10 ft from me and didn't even look at me. But once all of the hotel guests gathered around to see them, they both climbed the trees, they were more scared of us than we were of them.

    My point is this: we have to understand each other.
  • 07-01-2016
    Jayem
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Engineer90 View Post
    There were black bears hanging out around the hotel I was staying at in NH. Didn't see one on the trails, but in the Hotel parking lot, we saw 2. They paid no attention to me or my wife. The youngest walked about 6 feet from me and looked at me but walked away. The bigger one got about 10 ft from me and didn't even look at me. But once all of the hotel guests gathered around to see them, they both climbed the trees, they were more scared of us than we were of them.

    My point is this: we have to understand each other.

    The biologists here say some of the Bears in high-human population areas are normalized to humans and they tend to ignore us even if we are close, BUT, and this is big, the second a human stops out of caution, it can confuse these bears and they have been known to attack. In other words, ignore the bear and pass within 6 feet, maybe nothing happens. Stop 6 feet from a bear or freak out, you are going down.
  • 07-01-2016
    Engineer90
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    BUT, and this is big, the second a human stops out of caution, it can confuse these bears and they have been known to attack. In other words, ignore the bear and pass within 6 feet, maybe nothing happens. Stop 6 feet from a bear or freak out, you are going down.

    I couldn't agree more since I've heard the same. Them being predatory animals have the "flight-or-flight" instinct. I wouldn't wanna test it on a bear, even a juvenile black bear can easily kill you, let alone a full grown male Grizzly, you're f***ed.

    From what I heard is that they understand body language. If you show you're scared or if they perceive it, then they will make you a target. When I saw the bears, I wasn't scared, I just looked at them without showing emotion and moved normally. Running away would have been a mistake.