Jump bike turned into a commuter- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Jump bike turned into an (electric) commuter

    So with my aging body and declining knees I just can't take the jumps and hits like I used to. Back in my heyday I would ride 4 hours a day 7 days a week (before a family and the end of college). I just hated seeing my favorite jump hardtail sit in the corner for years and years, the Le Toy II made by 24 bikes. Overbuilt, heavy, and dated by today's DJ bike standards. So what is the best use for a bike that I can't pedal around anymore? Make it my faster commuter! With some electric oomph of course.

    Now on those days when I don't have enough time to ride at 15mph, when I am too wore out from a previous ride, or when I just don't feel like taking a car I pull out this bike. This sums up every day of my life really, I just love two wheels.



    This is her in full kit. The batteries are mounted in the ammo can. Wheels are 17" moped with DOT rated tires. Plenty of pep to cruise around 30mph, plenty of stout to jump down stairs, and enough stopping power to nose wheelie the beast

    Just thought I would share what happens when a man gets too old to ride a bike like it is intended, but can't let go of the frame. He just makes a new toy that sits next to his other pedal bikes
    Last edited by johnrobholmes; 12-09-2010 at 04:54 PM.

  2. #2
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    So I go to get ready for a ride, and notice that the front quick release is loose. You can actually see it dangling in the pic, taken before I noticed. I go to tighten, and it looks like the other 1/2 is missing. Bummer. I look a bit closer, and the lower stanchion is broken! This fork hasn't got but a few hundred miles on it, has never hit anything, and is in beautiful condition. Totally ruined! Luckily I have a Boxxer here that I can slap on, but now I gotta get another fork.

    Ruined my day.


    I'm surprised I haven't gotten any "your cheating" posts yet. I suppose many of you would ride an electric bike or moped if you had the need.

  3. #3
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    That ammo box is awesome.
    Pugsley, Bullit

  4. #4
    Big Gulps, Alright!
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    Maybe it's the small wheels, but that thing looks raked.
    Axle Standards Explained

    Founder at North Atlantic Dirt, riding & writing about trails in the northeast.

  5. #5
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    Sharp eye there. The frame was designed for 5" travel forks and it is running 7" in this pic. I am thinking of dropping the front wheel to 16" (20" bmx) size and get the trail back in check. It kinda handles like a bag of runny crap like this, although not near as bad as the A2B bike I have. Fine at 30mph, but below 10mph I can't really take both hands off.

  6. #6
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    That thing is pretty epic. I wish I had one for bumming around campus. Much better than a full size moped (that people often run up on the sidewalks and between classes lol).

    Anyway I 2nd dropping the travel/getting a different fork setup. It would probably be more stable

  7. #7
    I dig trails!
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    Old school meets new school. I dig it.

    <object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/DJLDF6qZUX0?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/DJLDF6qZUX0?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>

  8. #8
    the test dummy
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    sick bike i kinda really want it now
    Quote Originally Posted by craftworks750
    Riding a mtb is like a reset button, 10 mins in and there is nothing else in the world that matters.
    my bikes
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    Ben

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the kind words. I'm still waiting for the "cheater cheater pumpkin eater" crowd to come in. Just in case they do, I am working on a tow so that I can take this bike to local trails with my SuperLight in tow. Then when they drive their SUV to the trail head with bike on top I can show them just how much I am cheating About 1 penny per mile charge cost VS the 15mpg that most SUVs get (including my own).

    So, to the task at hand. I am in action of replacing my front shock right now. Going from the Marz Super T Pro to the Boxxer WC is loosing a pound of the front end. Not so big of a deal considering the bike is 73.4 lbs or 33.3 kilos. Soooo, this has me on a sort of weight weenie goal here. Certainly, using a hub motor is the last way to make a light build, but I do have other hubs here that aren't quite so beefy.

    1st place to lose weight- wheels. The front wheel is 10.6 lbs with the beefy tire and moto rim. I have a bmx front with a dual sport DOT tire that will shave 4.5 lbs. I could swap on a bmx tire for another pound or two of savings, but I just dont trust some bicycle parts with the sheer awesome this bike sees. The rear hub motor is ridiculous heavy, so I may be able to save another 4 pounds there, plus weight savings of using a lighter rim and tire.

    I guess beyond the wheels there really isn't much else I can lose. Looks like I can save 10 to 15 lbs anyway. The rest is kit that I need. Going to a divorced drivetrain instead of hub motor could save another 9 pounds I bet, but that is a project for another day.


    So now the big question. Keep with a 16 or 17" moped wheel set, or maybe swap to 26" or 24s for some big time speed with light wheels? Lacing wheels is a lot of fun for me, always new challenges to be had.
    owner, Holmes Bikes

  10. #10
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    Assisted bikes are for communists and revolutionaries

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=658868

  11. #11
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    As much as I would love to say this thing is an assist bike, I don't pedal the damn thing at all. Three horsepower makes my attempts at locomotion pretty feeble. If I had to put a name to it, it would just be the funnest moped I have. It beats the pants off my other 50cc rides.
    owner, Holmes Bikes

  12. #12
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    Wow, what rotten luck with parts lately. I was installing the Boxxer 2010 WC onto the bike, and when cinching down the Maxle the cone nut let go. Threads just pulled out, easy as pie. What a frigging bummer. I needed this bike ready for Wednesday to let an engineering group ride, in hopes I could bribe them to make me some parts in exchange for some fun rides
    owner, Holmes Bikes

  13. #13
    Big Gulps, Alright!
    Reputation: Berkley's Avatar
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    I don't mean to be a d!ck but that bike seems like a waste of a perfectly good fork.
    Axle Standards Explained

    Founder at North Atlantic Dirt, riding & writing about trails in the northeast.

  14. #14
    local trails rider
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    If it were mine... I'd go for a rigid DJ fork with 20mm axle. At least Identiti and DMR make those. I have an Identiti 1420 XL (a bit taller than most DJ forks) on my "trailbike".

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  15. #15
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    Maybe you guys/ gals like to hit potholes at 35mph on rigid or cheap forks, but I value my life too much to use anything else. You gotta remember, this isn't an assisted bike. This is a legal (73 pound) moped that keeps up with traffic. Sometimes bumps sneak up and I need the front end to be stiff and plush.


    Edit: I need to keep in mind that 99% of you have never ridden anything like this and don't know what to expect or what a safe and reliable build entails. If you have questions about particulars of component selection don't hesitate to ask up, you will get no judgement from me.
    Last edited by johnrobholmes; 12-11-2010 at 11:30 AM.
    owner, Holmes Bikes

  16. #16
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    Got the bike back together after some overnight delivery service. The air fork is showing more brake dive, but I have plenty of overhead for pumping it up and stiffening it. So far it rides nice, but I do need to swap out the front for a 16" to get the rake and trail under control. I think the Le Toy's days may be numbered, I am itching to convert it back to a normal bicycle and fab up a frame to get around all this battery box nonsense. I have quite a few designs in mind, and have built 4 frames so far.


    Crappy night time cell phone pic.

    owner, Holmes Bikes

  17. #17
    Big Gulps, Alright!
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    Dude, you are asking for it with that much leverage on the headtube. I would not want to hit a pothole at 35mph, for that reason alone.

    Nothing about that frame was ever designed for a motor, or a DC fork.
    Axle Standards Explained

    Founder at North Atlantic Dirt, riding & writing about trails in the northeast.

  18. #18
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    No bicycle frame is designed for a motor. When I sit on the frame I am about 35% sag, which puts it right at the same ride height that the "Berkley approved" 5 inch travel forks sit. When I checked with 24 bikes they stated that 7" of travel was no problem. The front end is one huge gusset, the frame in general was way overbuilt as compared to the frames they produce now.

    Thanks for your concerns. As I said, I will be building another frame soon to replace this one, so don't worry too much.
    owner, Holmes Bikes

  19. #19
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    A bit better pic



    The new fork rides so much better than the old. Even with a lot of sag it is very predictable. I have the compression turned up pretty high, and brake dive is not noticeable. It is nice and stable. This bike is my daily driver for most of the year, and until I build a replacement frame I will continue to ride it any chance I get.
    owner, Holmes Bikes

  20. #20
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    Still no replacement frame, but about 400 miles have been kept off my car since December. Mostly thanks to this bike.

    Latest build. I dropped quite a few pounds and now she sits at 59lb.




    Mods, feel free to move this to the "assist" forum if you need. Although I can admit there is very little assist happening, this bike is just a recycled moped.
    owner, Holmes Bikes

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