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  1. #1
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    hydration pack advise for a noob! :)

    Allo all! this may have been ask/answer a lot before... but i'm a noob into MTB, we (6 of my friends in mid 30's - 45) all started last summer and we all bought new bikes for trails, nothing hardcore mostly green/blue trails for now.. anyhow, i was curious what pack i should get? i'm 6' 270lbs and i sweat a lot.. gotta start get in shape somehow right? heh so we usually do 1.5 - 2hrs trails. i was checking amazon and saw some cheap brand like Teton sport oasis 1100... and other brand dirt cheap! also was looking into real brand like Osprey Raptor 10 etc.. just few question i was wondering myself.. do i need big or small? since never used that before. i wanna start getting tools/accessories, but wanna start with backpack

    1- what should i look for? lots of mix reviews.. hard to guess (some reviews could get paid also)

    2- cheap brands on amazon.. price is awesome but will they do the job? (breath/comfy/bladder etc..)

    3- price range $200CND max

    if any other advise, i'll be glad to hear from you!! i'm falling in love with this sport and my daughter(7yr old) came with me last 2 rides before winter and she loves it!! so this summer i plan riding almost every day or 2.. with the group & daughter once in a while!!

    thanks in advance! happy holidays

    cheers!

  2. #2
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    I have 2 hydration packs. A small hip pack(Camelbak Repak LR4) with a 1.5 liter reservoir for after work and short rides. And a backpack(Mule LR 15) with a 3 liter reservoir for long days. I also carry a bottle but itís filled with hydration mix. Both are Camelbaks and are pretty good quality. Iíd avoid discount brands since they wonít last long in mountain biking. Youíre going to crash, get mud, dirt, and grime on them. My packs have been through everything Mother Nature can throw at me and they havenít broke yet.

    It really all depends on how much you ride and how much effort you exert. As a bigger guy, you might want more water. A backpack fits the bill. Some people are adamantly against packs of any kind but I honestly donít mind. I can carry my stuff and never be thirsty. Of course, there are smaller vest style hydration packs with 2 liter reservoirs as well.
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  3. #3
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    I am a big hydration pack fan. Starting using a Camebak in 1994 and have owned many different sizes and versions over the years. When Camelbak first starting using the bladders with the large screw on type lid, they had an issue with the seal. Tighten them enough to not leak and it was a real PITA to get the lid open. About that time, I was in a local shop and my wife saw me checking out the Ospreys. Two weeks later, she got me a Osprey Viper 10 for my birthday and I have been a Osprey fan since. I have been using that thing for years and love it. Her sister got me a orange Viper 9 this year for Christmas, so I am going to retire my old Viper 10 to family hikes.

    Items for flat repair, mult-tool, small LED light, and minor probems have a permanent place in the pack, as well as room for my wallet, truck keys and phone. During the cooler months and shorter rides, I do not use the bladder, preferring water bottles. On longer rides when I use the bladder, I will still use bottles, but save them for some sort of energy drink use. I only use water in the pack, because it easier to keep clean.

    I would recommend, if possible, finding a local shop that gives you the opportunity to try on a pack first hand. See how it feels and fits. My Viper 10 has tons of slack in the straps when adjusted for me, but my Viper 9 might not fit a large person.

    I want to add, that other than the lid issue that they later corrected, I never had an issue with Camelbak quality. I still have a well-used Pakster from 1996 hanging in a closet somewhere. The elastic straps are stretched out, but other than that, it still is still as good as ever. My wife has several Camelbak packs that get used on a regular basis.

    $200 CDN is easily within the price range of some vary nice packs.

    And glad you are loving it, as well as your daughter! They grow up so fast. Seems like I woke up one day, my oldest is 16 year old, no longer looks like a little girl and passing on offers to go fishing or riding. My 12 year old still loves it.
    Last edited by BrianU; 2 Weeks Ago at 07:36 PM.

  4. #4
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    At that weight, you are going to burn through a lot of water, that's just a fact of life IME. Modern camelback brand hydration packs are great, as are a few other brands. There isn't really any defining feature that makes one brand better, I've found quirks with all of them. Make sure you have enough room in it to fit a tube, mini-pump, some tools and food in the form of at least a few nutrition bars. I would not recommend a hip-pack or something too minimalist. The biggest (interior volume) camelbacks are a bit on the large side for riding that will only last a few hours, but that's also just a few ounces of fabric too. I'd go for something in the middle-of-the-road as far as interior volume, like a Mule or similar size from one of the other manufacturers.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  5. #5
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    I have multiple Evoc packs and they all work great, actually use Camelbak bladders in the backpacks. One thing I like about them is that some offer back protection and offer lifetime protection on the plate.

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  6. #6
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    I have back issues and it aggravates my back to have the weight of a camelbak on me.

    I just use a couple of waterbottles and a ziplock in my middle jersey pocket for a tube, co2 inflator and multitool.
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  7. #7
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    I have a Camel (my second Blowfish, first ruined by accident and no fault of the pack) but we got an Osprey for my kid. I like the original Camel valve best but the magnet on the Osprey is nicer and I like the pack better. Iíd get something hi viz next time.

  8. #8
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    ď Bigger is always better unless itís your CellmateĒ!

    At your size I say look for a biggin. Iím only 215, but I burn thru water fast. Nothing worse than running out on the trail on a hot day and cramping up. Been there, done that.
    I have always run Camelbacks, no preference just what I have purchased.

    I would love to ride with the freedom of a water bottle and nothing on my back but I never have and never will.

    Itís ok to go home with a bit of water in your pack, it really stinks when you want some and your packs dry.
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  9. #9
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    I have a 3 camel packs of different sizes and got a osprey one intended for biking for Christmas. I always have trouble with the lids sealing on the camel back. One is super bad and I spill water by the time I get it. I like the fold over top of the Osprey. The bite valve is a bit different, but like the magnet. Holds 3 liters but have only filled it to two so far and I still dump most out.

  10. #10
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    Here is a post I wrote about this subject not too long ago. If you desire...

    https://forums.mtbr.com/oregon/pack-...l#post13892415


    You don't need a large pack unless you plan to carry (or shed) extra clothing.
    Ideally you need water (as much as you feel adequate), tool storage for a few small tools. Random bits of crap like a phone. Wallet. Snacks. Blah Blah. Whatever it is you feel you'd like to carry for any given situation. I like to have a few pockets for random stuff so it's not all loose in the bottom where you need to dig for your favorite snack.

    One thing that may sway your thought process is finding a pack that comfortably fits you as a bigger fella. A riding friend is probably 250? I don't know, I'm not good at weight guessing but he rides with a normal sized Camelbak. I assume it is comfortable or he wouldn't be wearing it for the years he has.

    You can easily save money buy getting an off brand as long as it has storage capacity for your needs. Read reviews on the hydration system water delivery system to ensure the bite valve works well and hose is size adequately. The well known brands seem to have done their homework. The Osprey valve is less than desirable in my opinion but is effective. It may not last a lifetime like the Camelbak I have has.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianU View Post
    I am a big hydration pack fan. Starting using a Camebak in 1994 and have owned many different sizes and versions over the years. When Camelbak first starting using the bladders with the large screw on type lid, they had an issue with the seal. Tighten them enough to not leak and it was a real PITA to get the lid open. About that time, I was in a local shop and my wife saw me checking out the Ospreys. Two weeks later, she got me a Osprey Viper 10 for my birthday and I have been a Osprey fan since. I have been using that thing for years and love it. Her sister got me a orange Viper 9 this year for Christmas, so I am going to retire my old Viper 10 to family hikes.

    Items for flat repair, mult-tool, small LED light, and minor probems have a permanent place in the pack, as well as room for my wallet, truck keys and phone. During the cooler months and shorter rides, I do not use the bladder, preferring water bottles. On longer rides when I use the bladder, I will still use bottles, but save them for some sort of energy drink use. I only use water in the pack, because it easier to keep clean.

    I would recommend, if possible, finding a local shop that gives you the opportunity to try on a pack first hand. See how it feels and fits. My Viper 10 has tons of slack in the straps when adjusted for me, but my Viper 9 might not fit a large person.

    I want to add, that other than the lid issue that they later corrected, I never had an issue with Camelbak quality. I still have a well-used Pakster from 1996 hanging in a closet somewhere. The elastic straps are stretched out, but other than that, it still is still as good as ever. My wife has several Camelbak packs that get used on a regular basis.

    $200 CDN is easily within the price range of some vary nice packs.

    And glad you are loving it, as well as your daughter! They grow up so fast. Seems like I woke up one day, my oldest is 16 year old, no longer longer looks like a little girl and passing on offers to go fishing or riding. My 12 year old still loves it.
    Nice post, and yeah, C-bak quality is hard to beat.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by abaughman View Post
    I have a 3 camel packs of different sizes and got a osprey one intended for biking for Christmas. I always have trouble with the lids sealing on the camel back. One is super bad and I spill water by the time I get it. I like the fold over top of the Osprey. The bite valve is a bit different, but like the magnet. Holds 3 liters but have only filled it to two so far and I still dump most out.
    Camelbak has fixed the leakage issue on their bladders.

  13. #13
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    I prefer 2 bottles on the bike most of the time, but if I'm on a long ride in hot conditions or if I am on duty patrolling the trail systems I'll ride with a pack. Get one that is cool on your back, that doesn't flop around or fall to one side, that has enough capacity to carry the water you need and room for additional items you may wish to carry. I use reservoirs from Source Tactical Gear and have been very impressed with them. Their 3L reservoir fits all of my packs.

    My 1st generation Osprey from 1997 is small enough that it doesn't fit much once the water is in it, but the quality and stability are top notch. My wife also has a newer Osprey that she really likes.

    Sometimes I'll ride with my REI Flash 18 when I need more capacity, but it is not as stable or cool on the back.

    My Ortleib COR13 has good capacity and room to attach jackets or extra gear on the outside. It is pretty stable and suspended to allow for some cooling.

    One of my most used packs is a department store Outdoor Products hydration pack. I took out the cheap reservoir and drinking tube and use the Source Tactical reservoir with it. It has good capacity (even with 3L of water) with plenty of pockets for organization, places to stuff and secure additional gear, and has a decent air flow channel for cooling. With it fully loaded, it isn't as stable as I would like on the really rough trails, but the waist strap and chest strap help.

    While it is often a challenge to buy online, you might check Sierra Trading Post and REI Outlet because they often have a good selection of closeout hydration packs.

  14. #14
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    Is it actually possible to wear a pack and not get a sweaty back?

    Realistically and honestly.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forest Rider View Post
    Is it actually possible to wear a pack and not get a sweaty back?

    Realistically and honestly.
    I don't think I've ever ridden with a pack that I didn't get a sweaty back. That is one of the reasons why I prefer to have my water and gear on the bike instead of on my back.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forest Rider View Post
    Is it actually possible to wear a pack and not get a sweaty back?

    Realistically and honestly.
    Sure, I have one on here, under my jacket. 1st blue helmet from the left.

    hydration pack advise for a noob! :)-susitna-100-february-17-2018-0028.jpg

    In that situation, I drink out of the bladder first, then rely on filling bottles with warm water/drink mix at the aid stations every 20 miles or so. The bladder is a backup though, in case the bottles freeze. I got lucky because my bike was mounted outside a vehicle for an hour and a half or so driving to the start and it was around -10 or so, the insulated bottles were right at their limit, but once I was able to refill em it worked out good. On some races, the bladder makes a lot of sense because it won't freeze and you don't need tons of water, logistically a lot easier than getting a bottle out in the winter sometimes.

    Anyway, I ride in the summer in plenty of warm temps too, I find the sweating thing to be over-rated. If it's hot out, you are going to sweat all over anyway, your head, face, arms, legs, etc. If it's cooler, you might avoid it a bit, but you'll still sweat out your chamois and pits pretty well if you are working hard, even when it's cooler. It's not a big deal for my back to get a little sweaty, as long as I clean my gear. Getting weight off my back is nice, but that's a balance, on some rides the camelback is just right and it's nice to have your gear all co-located in one spot, rather than having to have 3 sets of stuff mounted on 3 bikes (or switching it every time you want to ride). Much easier to just grab a camelback and go. If your rides are short and you are fit, you don't need much, maybe a waterbottle or two, but those things vary significantly as far as the length of the ride, terrain, fitness, etc. Another technique I use on some of my endurance races is to load the bike with everything except water, and then the water goes in a bladder-only camelback that is very minimalist (the same one I wear under my jacket/jersey in the winter). Then I've gotten some weight off my back and it's a lot easier to cram other stuff on the bike than water-bottles that take up too much volume of space or prevent being able to run frame-bags.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  17. #17
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    I currently have 2 Camelbaks (Rogue and Classic) and 2 Ospreys (Raptor 10 and Viper 3). All four are fine hydration packs and work extremely well. The Classic has one small thin pocket, the Rogue and Viper 3 are similar with minimal storage and the Raptor 10 has a few pockets and significantly more storage.

    I actually prefer to ride without a pack but when I'm out for more than about 1.5 hours, I bring one of the packs. I have a single bottle cage and a small seat bag to hold a spare tube, levers, tool, band-aids, etc.

    Here in FL it is hot much of the time so the packs are hot on the back. I find the Ospreys a little bit better than the Camelbaks for this. The bite valves are different but both very effective. I use the Raptor 10 mostly in "winter" when I have a layer or two to shed when it gets warmer throughout the morning and afternoon. Most of the year I'm riding in shorts and short sleeve jersey from early in the morning so the mid-size packs work well for water, snacks, phone, small camera, etc.

    Osprey makes a model called the Syncro that utilizes a farmed mesh webbing on the back that suspends the pack away from your back a bit. It is supposed to be really effective at keeping the back cool. I'd like to try one and see how it works.

  18. #18
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    Oh good, I was beginning to think I was a freak of nature. All the people talking about hydration packs that vent well to prevent sweating got me wondering!

    I had a long sleeve Sombrio jersey this morning, 50 degrees and the fancy back venting thing from Osprey and I was still soaked. ha

    I guess the point is that if a person is shopping for a pack, the "these breathe better" advertisements should not be taken as a serious purchase point.

  19. #19
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    I sweat at the best of times. I've recently started using Camelbak's Skyline pack. Similar in storage to my older Camelbak Consigliere? But much lower down my pack. It doesn't stop me sweating, but the top of the pack must be just lower than my shoulder blades, so it feels a lot less restrictive. And the bladder being low on the back is nice.

    But I think everyone has covered the points, go for a goldilocks size, not too small that you can't fit your mandatory bits in, and not so large you take too much. My old one was about 8 litres for storage, which was cozy, but my newer Skyline is only 7L but I've not noticed the difference. It's perfect for my rides which aren't generally in the heat, and are less than two hours. It's got a three litre bladder but I only half fill it and rarely finish it. And they can last a long time if you look after them too.

  20. #20
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    I've had many packs over the years ,mostly Camelbaks, Had one of the early OSPREY'S ,didn't like the sealing system, Had some cheap one from Costco that I didn't like from the get go ,took it back right away. Had something from a online store that was okay ,it wore out fast. Been using a Mule for a few years ,has enough storage for me ,can add or subtract clothing to the elastic bands ,if I'm not going for a long ride ,I don't fill it up.

  21. #21
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    Dakine makes some great packs as well.

    I'm also in the no pack team, unless is a group ride which are usually longer.

    Frame bag, and bottles on the bike work great for me.
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forest Rider View Post
    Is it actually possible to wear a pack and not get a sweaty back?

    Realistically and honestly.
    it depends on the pack. Check out Osprey Syncros series of packs. They have a standoff frame with mesh panel to allow ventilation to your back.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    it depends on the pack. Check out Osprey Syncros series of packs. They have a standoff frame with mesh panel to allow ventilation to your back.
    I have one, I don't find that it eliminates sweating. I do find that adjusting your clothing in general to the climate is the best prevention, like taking the time to take off a layer, unzip, etc. That at least will minimize it. Then you ride in AR in the summer time and you don't have to do anything, because you'll be soaked from head to toe anyway.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  24. #24
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    Camel, LR series - that's the way to go if you run a pack.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    I have one, I don't find that it eliminates sweating. I do find that adjusting your clothing in general to the climate is the best prevention, like taking the time to take off a layer, unzip, etc. That at least will minimize it. Then you ride in AR in the summer time and you don't have to do anything, because you'll be soaked from head to toe anyway.
    If we could just figure out a way to capture that sweat and refill the bladder as we rode we could ride on and on.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  26. #26
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    I've had a few camelbaks and now have an Ospray Raptor 10. The CamelBak rogue was indestructible but it's from about 8 years ago. I never liked camelbak's bladders and I could only fit a 2L in the rogue.

    I love the Raptor 10. Plenty of space and the dedicated tool pouch is excellent. The bladder doesn't turn my clean water into plastic flavored water like the camelbaks I've had.

    Whatever you get make sure it's a 3 liter bladder. If it's a short ride just don't fill it all the way. When you need it you'll be very glad you had the extra capacity.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Camel, LR series - that's the way to go if you run a pack.
    Agreed. I love my Skyline LR. At times, I actually prefer wearing it, to going packless.
    Last edited by mtnbkrmike; 2 Weeks Ago at 07:10 AM.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    If we could just figure out a way to capture that sweat and refill the bladder as we rode we could ride on and on.
    The Stillsuit.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    The Stillsuit.
    Ha, nice reference.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    The Stillsuit.
    Iíve got to catch up on my sci-fi movie watching.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  31. #31
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    I too live large. You will want to go the shops and try on the packs as an ill-fitting pack pulling your shoulders and digging at your arm pits is true misery. Wear whatever top you usually ride in, and try them on at the shop. Keep it on for a while.


    The better packs will last a good long time ( my Camelback HAWG has served me for 18 years) so don't buy your second choice pack just to save $30...buy the one you like.
    MERCY! MERCY! MERCY!

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by MOJO K View Post
    I too live large. You will want to go the shops and try on the packs as an ill-fitting pack pulling your shoulders and digging at your arm pits is true misery. Wear whatever top you usually ride in, and try them on at the shop. Keep it on for a while.


    The better packs will last a good long time ( my Camelback HAWG has served me for 18 years) so don't buy your second choice pack just to save $30...buy the one you like.
    Funny how long the Camelbak brand lasts. Iíve had the Mule model for 18 years as well.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  33. #33
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    And the new Camelbacks have a lot of good features, like pockets inside and so on. There was a time when people said the Osprey or Dakines were way better, but I find that Camelback has stepped up their game significantly and all of them make good stuff without a clear leader IMO.

    One thing I would like to have on ALL packs is the hose INSIDE of the shoulder strap with a zipper, like a few winter (backcountry skiing) packs I've had. To be able to get the hose out of the way completely is nice or let it be exposed when you want it exposed. Keeps it out of the dirt and anything else when transporting and so on.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Iíve got to catch up on my sci-fi movie watching.
    Movie is not that good, read the book.

  35. #35
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    I have an old basic CamelBak 70 oz that is not a back pack also, (looks a lot like the newer Teton Trailrunner 2.0) and a newer $39 cheap back pack 70 oz unit. I usually use the CamelBak bladder in the back pack, but the cheap one allows for the drink tube to go over either shoulder so I can put both bladders in on longer rides. Usually ice and water in one and ice with sports drink or tea in the other.

    What ever you get consider going to the local UPS store and buying a couple of cheap padded shipping envelopes. I fold them in half and put one on each side of the bladder to keep the ice from melting too fast.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by armii View Post
    I have an old basic CamelBak 70 oz that is not a back pack also, (looks a lot like the newer Teton Trailrunner 2.0) and a newer $39 cheap back pack 70 oz unit. I usually use the CamelBak bladder in the back pack, but the cheap one allows for the drink tube to go over either shoulder so I can put both bladders in on longer rides. Usually ice and water in one and ice with sports drink or tea in the other.

    What ever you get consider going to the local UPS store and buying a couple of cheap padded shipping envelopes. I fold them in half and put one on each side of the bladder to keep the ice from melting too fast.
    Take your bladder after each ride and fill it about a 1/4 full of water and then throw it in the freezer. Now itís ready to use for your next ride bacteria free plus as you fill it the water stays cold throughout the ride.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  37. #37
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    Maybe you can find a sale from REI for their year end clearance.
    https://www.rei.com/rei-garage/c/bac...ks&outlet=true

    I saw the Raptor 10 (Osprey) on page 1, haven't gone further into other pages.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    it depends on the pack. Check out Osprey Syncros series of packs. They have a standoff frame with mesh panel to allow ventilation to your back.
    I've got the Osprey 10 and I'm pretty sure I sweat as much wearing that pack as with my 16-18 year old Camelbak. Maybe if I left the back empty the back venting thingy wouldn't be pressed to my back. haha



    If I had to do it again, I think I'd opt for the Raptor 14. The physical dimensions are marginally larger, but I feel it has a better assortment of pockets. I dislike the minimal secure pockets on the 10. At purchase I thought less pockets than I had in the Camelbak would be better but I prefer more now that I've got the experience of both.

    The large compartment has an elastic mesh pocket that quickly fills up. I have first aid stuff stored in it and it's hard to fit a CliffBar or ProBar in the mesh pocket.
    I store the ProBar in the large external pocket with the single closure. I don't store anything of great value for fear of it bouncing out. The hip pockets fit ShotBlocks and Gel pack's perfectly.
    The arched top external pocket is good to toss in a snack too. Both external pockets are equally accessible once the pack is removed. The 14 has a couple external pockets that you can access without removing the pack.
    The mesh pocket with the key lock is sort of silly in my opinion. A secure key storage location filled with holes that can be torn with a sharp key -just seems like a solid closure is more suitable (I think previous model years was in fact closed).

    For me personally, another secured internal pocket would be useful for a wallet. Then as I stuff random junk in the main compartment, I wouldn't risk pulling the wallet (or other valuable item) out when pulling out a base layer, for example.

    The Raptor 10 is great, just wish it had more pockets (my own wrong selection). Water delivery is fine. Volume is sufficient. Very easy to operate and is functional. And the dedicated tool warp is perfect. Keeps the tools together and the weight is low!

  39. #39
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    I'm one of those that really likes the pack. I go through too much water for a bottle, it's easier and faster to get a drink, and it acts as a bit of protection if I crash.

    I just replaced my 14 year old Camelbak HAWG with a Osprey Raptor 14. The HAWG has worked great through the years, but it was starting to show it's age. It was still on it's original bladder!

    Something that pushed me to the Raptor was the organization. My old HAWG only had two pockets. That made it difficult to get keys, wallet, phone, tools, bike pump, clothes all organized nicely. Specifically in a way that would ensure my phone doesn't get scratched by my keys or bike tools, but still be able to easily reach something if needed. The Raptor is 100 times better in that regard. Some of the newer Camelbak's are a lot better too.

    As for advice, bring the tools and gear that you normally bring to the shop and try fitting them in various packs. Does your bike pump fit in the tool pouch, or is it too long? Are the hip belt pockets big enough to fit a snack or phone? Can you fit your jacket in the main pouch? Can you find a spot for each piece of gear?
    This isn't something you can test at a shop easily, but most packs lose a lot of space when you actually fill up the bladder. That big main pouch that seemed roomy earlier now looks very slender with the bladder encroaching on it.

  40. #40
    the discerning hooligan
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    Quote Originally Posted by offroadcmpr View Post
    ... The HAWG has worked great through the years, but it was starting to show it's age. .

    Oh, mine is showing it's age....but so am I.
    MERCY! MERCY! MERCY!

  41. #41
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    well thanks a lot for the reply all! i went and tried a few backpack today.. and of course none of all store i went had the Osprey Raptor 10/14.. i did tried the Osprey Viper and didn't like it because no hip/waist support (maybe because i'm on the heavy side) and other brand i tried had all same problems, i tried the Platypus Duthie A.M 10.0 and that was super comfy at the waist area(because had the waist/hip support). As for the Camelbak brand, most places didn't carry much of them (Because of the Gun thing they support) and none there had the waist/hip support. so since i did like the idea of the Osprey Raptor organisation, i did some searching online.. of course all good website US they dont ship Osprey/Camelbak and other brand to Canada.. restriction US shipping only, it sucks because Rei had good deal on it.. i even talked to them to double check. so i took a gamble and ended up ordering from Chainreactioncycle, i figured why not get raptor 14 instead of 10, since they are both same height.. color gonna be Persian Blue & look like a nice color even tho it's not gonna match my bike color!! since it's silver/orange.. i need new helmet so i'll check for some blue in it to match the backpack hahah 1 store could order it here, but asking 199$CND.. and got it cheaper from chainreactioncycle..
    now time to to gather my wishlist for tools and other stuff to put in bag!! since i got time to waste waiting for spring hahaha i only have a mini-pump so far! :P

  42. #42
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    Multitool (with chainbreak is advisable)
    Spare chain master link
    Tire lever(s) (check your local shops for a decent quality one. On the MTB I carry a single lever that has a metal core (to help prevent breakage).
    Leatherman is nice to include a knife and pliers
    Knife
    Zipties of various sizes
    (2) CO2 cartridges and spring loaded nozzle is a nice one (in addition/instead of pump)
    Tube
    First aid as you see fit. 4x4 gauze pad. random bandaids. eye drops.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forest Rider View Post
    Multitool (with chainbreak is advisable)
    Spare chain master link
    Tire lever(s) (check your local shops for a decent quality one. On the MTB I carry a single lever that has a metal core (to help prevent breakage).
    Leatherman is nice to include a knife and pliers
    Knife
    Zipties of various sizes
    (2) CO2 cartridges and spring loaded nozzle is a nice one (in addition/instead of pump)
    Tube
    First aid as you see fit. 4x4 gauze pad. random bandaids. eye drops.
    ahh thanks for the info.. i'll start a notepad writing down items.. i rather be prepare then being stuck in the wood and walk hahaha it happen to a friend end of season.. broke his chains and had to walk 40mins back to the car!! since none of us had tools etc.. that was a reality check for us since we're all new into the sport! it's like going camping with a tent and nothing else.. need way more stuff hahha!! it's all good loving this anyway!! something to plan/do and get me out the house instead of TV

  44. #44
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    I love my Osprey Raptor 14 bag! It carries 3L of water and it's breathable against your back. If you look around, you can get them on sale. I got mine from Amazon for $115 a while back. It was designed for mountain bikers.

    https://www.osprey.com/us/en/product...-RAPTOR14.html

    hydration pack advise for a noob! :)-20170910-ospreyraptor-0008_7zu232v.original.jpg
    Trek Emonda | Transition Sentinel

  45. #45
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    You're a bigger person than I am, but for folks interested in a solid budget combo that I've been happy with and maybe you/daughter/friends might be:
    * Sports pack - $18 (NOT come with bladder):
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B078RV2QC4/
    * Hydrapak bladder - $28:
    https://www.amazon.com/Hydrapak-Shape-Shift-Reversible-Reservoir-Clear/dp/B01MSVTIHR/
    Last edited by kevin_sbay; 2 Weeks Ago at 02:41 AM. Reason: fix link

  46. #46
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    If I was in the market for a new bag, I think I would try this one https://www.amazon.com/Mubasel-Gear-...+pack+backpack

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by armii View Post
    If I was in the market for a new bag, I think I would try this one https://www.amazon.com/Mubasel-Gear-...+pack+backpack
    You know, it just doesn't make sense for a guy who is buying his first hydration pack to blindly order one off the Internets. I'm surprised you didn't get that gist from the helpful posts above.

  48. #48
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    Deuter EXP Air 10 is what I use here in AZ. 100ml bladder is essential in AZ, and I will often supplement that with another bottle or two depending on the ride. I always like to take at least one extra bottle with me on longer rides since I seem to run into people often who do not have enough water with them, ever since a woman died of heat related dehydration after I had been talking to her and her group not long before. I have given away a couple of bottles like this now. The Deuter has an internal frame and mesh which holds the pack high and away from your back. I always carry a lot of gear with me for most eventualities, since most of the rides here are fairly quiet and remote. You don't really want to get stuck out in the sun for any longer than you need! Your pack reflects you needs for the kind of riding you most do. Research and experience will tell you what is best.
    It's all Here. Now.

  49. #49
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    I'm a little surprised that the OP found the Platypus pack to be the most comfortable but didn't buy it.
    MERCY! MERCY! MERCY!

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockerc View Post
    100ml bladder is essential in AZ, and I will often supplement that with another bottle or two depending on the ride. I always like to take at least one extra bottle with me on longer rides since I seem to run into people often who do not have enough water with them.
    I do the same here in LV, 3L of water in the pack and also a frozen 24oz bottle on the frame. That way when the pack is empty I know to high tail it back to the truck. I've only ran out of water once (was before the frozen bottle), never want to do that again.
    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    some weird crazed desert dweller.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finch Platte View Post
    You know, it just doesn't make sense for a guy who is buying his first hydration pack to blindly order one off the Internets. I'm surprised you didn't get that gist from the helpful posts above.
    I shared my opinion of what from my experience and research would by my pick if I needed a new hydration pack would be. That was clearly stated, I'm surprised you didn't get it!
    And who it F are you to say that the opinion of someone else doesn't make sense and is not helpful.
    Last edited by armii; 2 Weeks Ago at 08:52 AM. Reason: .

  52. #52
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    I just got the Henty Enduro pack, https://henty.cc/shop/enduro-backpack/ only have 2 rides on it so far but it's been awesome. It's part hip bag, part backpack. 3L bladder included now, 9 pockets for stashing stuff, MOLLE webing to put any kind of pouches you want on it, sits low on your hips (once adjusted correctly) but still has thin mesh breathable shoulder straps to keep it stable. No more sweaty back, sore neck or shoulders.

    I retired my MULE it was getting pretty worn out and I couldn't get the smell of pickles and beer out of it give the Henty a look OP!
    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    some weird crazed desert dweller.

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by armii View Post
    I shared my opinion of what from my experience and research would by my pick if I needed a new hydration pack would be. That was clearly stated, I'm surprised you didn't get it!
    And who it F are you to say that the opinion of someone else doesn't make sense and is not helpful.
    Wow, thanks for the neg rep, and Happy New Year.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finch Platte View Post
    Wow, thanks for the neg rep, and Happy New Year.
    Any comment with the neg rep? I always enjoy a good reason for such a childish act.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by MOJO K View Post
    I'm a little surprised that the OP found the Platypus pack to be the most comfortable but didn't buy it.
    i really like the idea of the Raptor design organization, specially with tools section on bottom of bag etc.. but i'm not worried if i dont like the Raptor 14 i order, my friend order a 19 trance 2 29er blue, and he told me if i dont like it, he'll buy my backpack since will match color of bike! & i'll prolly get that Platypus, if that's the case

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by snooky35 View Post
    i really like the idea of the Raptor design organization, specially with tools section on bottom of bag etc.. but i'm not worried if i dont like the Raptor 14 i order, my friend order a 19 trance 2 29er blue, and he told me if i dont like it, he'll buy my backpack since will match color of bike! & i'll prolly get that Platypus, if that's the case
    That, my friend, is a rare thing here....the perfectly reasonable answer. We don't really do "perfectly reasonable" here, so please come back at me with a snarky remark next time.
    MERCY! MERCY! MERCY!

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevin_sbay View Post
    I'm a fan of Hydrapak Shape Shift Reversible Reservoirs. After the ride empty it out, quick-disconnect the hose, turn the reservoir inside-out, & hang it to dry. No brushes, toxic cleaners, or funky taste.

    Hose accessories: quick-disconnect, magnetic clip, high-volume bite-valve are best in the business.

    I like their packs too, but they stopped making them. I own 3 of them. There are still a few NOS on ebay.

    Osprey now uses Hydrapak reservoirs, but not reversible.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with all your might.... (Ecclesiastes 9:10)

  58. #58
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    OMG!
    I just googled the reversible reservoirs.
    They seem like a great idea.
    Is there a downside?
    Do they leak out of the top?
    It also says they are dishwasher safe.

  59. #59
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    i use water bottles on 2 hour rides or less. Camelbak on longer rides

    i carry..

    crank bros m17 multi tool
    pump
    tube
    master link
    electrical tape wrapped around my seat post (to secure broken cables)
    dollar bill (for tire tears, keeps the tube in)

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by nauc View Post
    i use water bottles on 2 hour rides or less. Camelbak on longer rides

    i carry..

    crank bros m17 multi tool
    pump
    tube
    master link
    electrical tape wrapped around my seat post (to secure broken cables)
    dollar bill (for tire tears, keeps the tube in)
    I find a hundred dollar bill works better... my Mum always said I had expensive tastes, but peace of mind always comes at a price...
    It's all Here. Now.

  61. #61
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    The cheap bags are a waste of money because the bladders have a very strong plastic taste. Its more cost effective to just buy a good brand on sale for $60.

    My advice is to not get a full sized pack, start with a small to medium sized one. Unfortunately 90% of packs with decent features are massive full sized multi-day backpacks despite 90% of riders just needing something small for a couple hours. The industry really just doesnt get it. Smaller light weight packs are much better for regular 2 hour rides, especially in the summer. 3 liters is the maximum I would consider (I generally only use around 1 liter for 2 hours), if you need more than 3 liters you would not be asking since youd be a pretty serious rider.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by idividebyzero View Post
    3 liters is the maximum I would consider (I generally only use around 1 liter for 2 hours), if you need more than 3 liters you would not be asking since youd be a pretty serious rider.
    I tend to drink more water than that. If it's more than 80 degrees out I can go through 2 liters of water in a hour long ride pretty easily. 3 liters is ok for 1.5 to 2 hours. If it's colder than 1 liter per hour is normal for me. That's one of the main reasons I do a pack instead of bottles.

  63. #63
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    hydration pack advise for a noob! :)

    Quote Originally Posted by snooky35 View Post
    well thanks a lot for the reply all! i went and tried a few backpack today.. and of course none of all store i went had the Osprey Raptor 10/14.. i did tried the Osprey Viper and didn't like it because no hip/waist support (maybe because i'm on the heavy side) and other brand i tried had all same problems, i tried the Platypus Duthie A.M 10.0 and that was super comfy at the waist area(because had the waist/hip support). As for the Camelbak brand, most places didn't carry much of them (Because of the Gun thing they support) and none there had the waist/hip support. so since i did like the idea of the Osprey Raptor organisation, i did some searching online.. of course all good website US they dont ship Osprey/Camelbak and other brand to Canada.. restriction US shipping only, it sucks because Rei had good deal on it.. i even talked to them to double check. so i took a gamble and ended up ordering from Chainreactioncycle, i figured why not get raptor 14 instead of 10, since they are both same height.. color gonna be Persian Blue & look like a nice color even tho it's not gonna match my bike color!! since it's silver/orange.. i need new helmet so i'll check for some blue in it to match the backpack hahah 1 store could order it here, but asking 199$CND.. and got it cheaper from chainreactioncycle..
    now time to to gather my wishlist for tools and other stuff to put in bag!! since i got time to waste waiting for spring hahaha i only have a mini-pump so far! :P
    CRC is a good resource for getting stuff cheaper than what your LBS offers, you wonít regret it. I order stuff from them quite frequently! Love the free shipping as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by kevin_sbay View Post
    Excellent suggestion! Hydrapak actually makes the bladder for EVOC and Ergon, so the quality is of a comparable standard as that of Camelbakís (disregarding the valve designs).


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  64. #64
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    ^^^ You'll like CRC less now that they made a deal not to sell Shimano in the USA :-p

    I just remembered, Camelbak makes several "mil-spec" models that are much like the regular ones only with molle.

    I mentioned before I want hi-vis... also want molle... they never ever are available together. Also would like a bright interior color, it helps with finding junk in the bottom, learned that from one of the bike packing bag companies but can't remember which.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
    ^^^ You'll like CRC less now that they made a deal not to sell Shimano in the USA :-p
    I live on the other side of the world , and Iíve always preferred SRAM.


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