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  1. #1
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    Humor: How to NOT clean bike parts with acetone.

    Just thought I'd share my little screw-up for your amusement:

    A procedure I do NOT recommend

    1. Carefully pour acetone into a disposable plastic cup until about 1/3 full. Not too full, you don't want to spill or waste anything...
    2. Take old toothbrush that you've already used to clean bike parts and scrub it in acetone to remove any residual grease
    3. Smile to self as grease comes off easily - wow, acetone works great!
    4. Smile fades as you notice weird gooey stuff building up on toothbrush - realize it is the cup rapidly dissolving
    5. Swear loudly as you run into house looking for a glass jar that you should have used in step 1.
    6. Attempt to pour contents of plastic cup into glass jar - realize plastic cup is mysteriously empty
    7. Notice that plastic cup is no longer attached to it's bottom
    8. Observe pool of acetone spreading across table - now melting toothbrush and nearby screwdriver handle
    9. Swear some more
    10. Grab paper towels and clean up big mess
    11. Throw everything away


    Note to self: Acetone melts certain plastics rather quickly.

    What I was trying to do, for those that care, was prep some alloy surfaces (a FSA carbon crank arm) prior to applying loctite 641. Previously, they were (incorrectly) covered with grease which I had already removed with Simple Green. I was going to use the Acetone to get the last bit of greasy film off so that the loctite would stick better.

    At least I didn't spill/drip any acetone on my cranks (arms). It never occurred to me that it could ruin the finish. I haven't tested this theory, but based on my recent experience, I'm not about to try.

    I knew acetone was strong (so I was wearing gloves), I didn't realize it could eat through a plastic cup in less than 30 seconds. Amazing.

    BTW: Anyone have any suggestions on how to clean such parts with Acetone now? I'll probably try q-tips next so that I can keep the acetone away from the carbon finish. Some have suggested rubbing alcohol instead, but I'd read that Acetone was a better degreaser for use prior to applying loctite. Clearly it can melt plastics faster!

    Cheers,

    George
    Last edited by mrthreeplates; 01-05-2011 at 11:00 AM.

  2. #2
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    The only cleaner that ever touches my bikes is isopropyl alcohol.
    Acetone's some dangerous shi t.

  3. #3
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    What the devil do you need acetone for? I agree, it's some nasty ****. Degreaser and isopropyl alcohol are all I've ever needed.
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  4. #4
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    Acetone has been banned at my work.... =\

  5. #5
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    Doh dishwashing detergent and water work just fine

    So does a dab of wd40..

  6. #6
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    WD40 on a rag works great. Really, it does. It gets rid of grease and grime without ruining paint. Just keep it off the discs and pads.
    My name is Chris and I ride a Prophet 650b with a Lefty.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prophet Julio
    WD40 on a rag works great. Really, it does. It gets rid of grease and grime without ruining paint. Just keep it off the discs and pads.

    You also need to keep it away from bearing, fork and shock seals.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkley
    What the devil do you need acetone for? I agree, it's some nasty ****. Degreaser and isopropyl alcohol are all I've ever needed.
    Just so you don't think I'm totally crazy...

    Some have recommended acetone as prep prior to using loctite 641:

    http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...-Clicking-BB30

    Obviously, you need to be more careful with it than I was!

  9. #9
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    Acetone + styrofoam/plastic = homemade napalm.

    edit: or was that gasoline and styrofoam?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtmartino
    Acetone + styrofoam/plastic = homemade napalm.

    edit: or was that gasoline and styrofoam?
    I believe its gas and styrofoam or gas and certain types of bar soap.

    I didnt think acetone was ALL that nasty. I work with it all the time in Organic Lab, there have been multiple things that are worse

  11. #11
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    Acetone's not nasty, it doesn't tolerate disrespect, but it's not nasty.

    I second (third?) using Isopropyl Alcohol. Acetone's for thinning paint, blasting out of blowtorches and treating epilepsy, not very good for cleaning.

  12. #12
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    I like alcohol as a cleaner too (keeping a spray bottle full was one of the best mechanic tips I've ever received) but it just doesn't seem to cut it for really greasy stuff or to work quickly enough either. For nastier stuff I use odorless mineral spirits, either on a rag for most parts or in a sealed container for soaking other parts, as it isn't as nasty as acetone and evaporates like acetone and alcohol.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkley
    What the devil do you need acetone for? I agree, it's some nasty ****. Degreaser and isopropyl alcohol are all I've ever needed.
    Key ingredient in nail polish remover. If you have wife, daughter, girlfriend or are a bit goth, you already have a bottle or two in your house.
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  14. #14
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    Diesel fuel works wonders, or kerosene, which is almost identical. I like the smell of diesel fuel, especially after it has been sent through a good engine, but I don't care for my hands smelling like it for long periods of time.

    For really nasty chains and the like, I use Dawn Direct Foam and an old toothbrush. Works very well, is cheap, a little bit goes a long way, clean up is easy, and the wife gets pissed when I wash diesel down the kitchen sink. With the Dawn, she never even knows.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkley
    What the devil do you need acetone for? I agree, it's some nasty ****. Degreaser and isopropyl alcohol are all I've ever needed.
    "degreaser" can refer to a lot of different chemicals, but most of these need to be rinsed off after use otherwise they will leave residue and break down greases applied afterwards. Hence the desire for something like acetone that naturally evaporates with no appreciable residue, like what most people know alcohol as being good for too. Mineral spirits does a decent job of this too, as does kerosene, without being quite as nasty as acetone.

    Another plus to these solvents over many standard degreasers is that you can filter out the junk and reuse the solvent if you're using it for things like soaking a chain in a jar

  16. #16
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    If you think acetone is good, try petroleum ether. Much better stuff, just wish I could buy it now I no longer work in a lab.
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?

  17. #17
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    As one person pointed out, its the main ingredient in some fingernail polish removers.

    In science class years ago, we had about 1/2 cup of acetone in a jar, and stuffed thousands of styrofoam peanuts into the jar. It dissolved about a cubic yard of them, leaving behind a nasty blob of petroleum byproduct about the size of one peanut.

    and it smells good to!
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  18. #18
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    Get yourself a can of brake cleaner at the local auto parts store.
    No moss...

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffw-13
    Get yourself a can of brake cleaner at the local auto parts store.

    Just don't get any overspray on any plastic or rubber parts. I had some brake cleaner overspray onto my stereo and it ate some big holes in the plastic housing.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott
    You also need to keep it away from bearing, fork and shock seals.
    Why is that? I was in the understanding that WD40 lubricates more than degreases. It has some solvent too hard?

    My brother just sprays all over any part of his bike that needs lubricating. I usually use Finish Line lubs on the chain and pretty much that's it until is sent to major maintenance to the LBS.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mithrandir
    Why is that? I was in the understanding that WD40 lubricates more than degreases. It has some solvent too hard?

    My brother just sprays all over any part of his bike that needs lubricating. I usually use Finish Line lubs on the chain and pretty much that's it until is sent to major maintenance to the LBS.
    According to wikipedia WD40 is 50% mineral spirits (a good solvent) and only 15% mineral oil (a light and not too good lubricant). If you spray WD40 on a bearing or seal you can force solvent past the seal and break down the grease or oil inside

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fix the Spade
    Acetone's not nasty, it doesn't tolerate disrespect, but it's not nasty


    As a young chemist student I once tried to pour acetic acid from a big 15 liter container into a 10 mL graduated cylinder. I wanted exactly 10mL and a fellow student offered to help me. As I started to pour he placed his head and face closely to the cylinder in order to check and say stop when I was done. Of course I ended pouring the acid all over the place including his face and clothes. No permanent harm was done as he quickly got under the emergency shower. But when I later had to explain it to the professor in charge of the lab he responded "No Kasper, It wasn't acetic acid that burnt your friend, it was YOU who burnt him"

    Kasper

  23. #23
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    Acetone on your skin will make it dry - not much more damage. It's awesome for quick drying glass lab equipment, too. But it's very flammable...

  24. #24
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    I use acetone to clean rubber scuff marks off the hull of my boat. Not in love with the smell but a small dab with a rag and the marks come right off.

  25. #25
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    Acetone is a powerful solvent. It will dissolve all plastics and ruin your bike's paint work. It is also what glue sniffers go after. I use kerosene or turpentine paint thinner to clean my bike.

    BTW, adding a little acetone to your gas tank will improve your vehicle's fuel economy but be careful about not spilling it on the paint work.

  26. #26
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    A lot of bad advice in this thread

    The OP is trying to prep mating surfaces for application of Locktite 641
    Locktite 614 PDF

    The instructions call for use of a 'Locktite cleaning solvent'. The most readily available substitute for this would be electrical contact cleaner. Available at automotve parts shops and hardware stores. Contact cleaner dries instantly and degreases without leaving any residue. It will not damage rubber components. For best results with 641, spray the area with contact cleaner. Wipe off excess grease with rag. Spray again with contact cleaner. Do not touch the area with your bare hands!! Even just the oils from your skin can affect the effectiveness of the 641.

    Substances like diesel fuel, mineral oil, wd40, dish soap & water, brake clean, etc.. will leave oily residue behind, resulting in poor performance of the 641.
    Its all Shits and Giggles until somebody Giggles and Shits

  27. #27
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    Hi Brewtality,

    Thanks for the tips. I happen to have this lying around (don't know how many years old it is, but it is at least 10-20 years)...

    See attached.

    Archer (Radio Shack) Cleaner Degreaser

    Contents: Trichlorotrifluoroethane 76-13-1 Trichloromonofluoromethane 75-69-4; Carbon Dioxide 124-38-9 Isopropanol 67-63-0.

    Edit: Sorry, I meant to say: is this the same electrical contact cleaner you mention?

    Thanks!!!

    George
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Humor:  How to NOT clean bike parts with acetone.-img_0411.jpg  


  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fix the Spade
    Acetone's not nasty, it doesn't tolerate disrespect, but it's not nasty.

    I second (third?) using Isopropyl Alcohol. Acetone's for thinning paint, blasting out of blowtorches and treating epilepsy, not very good for cleaning.

    Dude-

    There is a LOT of bad advice here.

    Take a look at this extract from the MSDS sheet for Acetone-

    Potential Chronic Health Effects:
    CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS: A4 (Not classifiable for human or animal.) by ACGIH. MUTAGENIC EFFECTS: Not available.
    TERATOGENIC EFFECTS: Not available.
    DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY: Classified Reproductive system/toxin/female, Reproductive system/toxin/male. The substance is toxic to central nervous system (CNS). The substance may be toxic to kidneys, the reproductive system, liver, skin. Repeated or prolonged exposure to the substance can produce target organs damage."


    I'm leaning toward it not being such a benevolent chemical. But to each their own.
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrthreeplates
    Hi Brewtality,

    Edit: Sorry, I meant to say: is this the same electrical contact cleaner you mention?

    That should work just fine
    Its all Shits and Giggles until somebody Giggles and Shits

  30. #30
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    i normally just put a little MEK (Methyl Ethyl Ketone) in a spray bottle and go to town on my whole bike makes my grips nice and tacky

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brewtality
    That should work just fine
    Super, thanks for the confirmation!

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrishei1
    i normally just put a little MEK (Methyl Ethyl Ketone) in a spray bottle and go to town on my whole bike makes my grips nice and tacky
    FTW
    I can barely get my mouth around it.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by mellowdave
    There is a LOT of bad advice here.
    I'm leaning toward it not being such a benevolent chemical. But to each their own.
    You misread my comment entirely.

    My advice was to use Isopropyl alcohol, acetone is not for cleaning.

    Regards acetone itself, see comment #22
    I am well aware of it's many (many many) health risks.
    But, if used for the right tasks and treated with appropriate respect, acetone is completely harmless, it will never try to mug you down a back alley or attack the postman. The problems begin with the workman, not the tool.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kasper

    But when I later had to explain it to the professor in charge of the lab he responded "No Kasper, It wasn't acetic acid that burnt your friend, it was YOU who burnt him"

    Kasper
    Awesome!

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kasper
    "No Kasper, It wasn't acetic acid that burnt your friend, it was YOU who burnt him"
    You're professor sounds like my kind'a guy.

  36. #36
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    One other data point for using acetone for this application: FSA's assembly procedure actually calls for cleaning with acetone (or similar product) prior to using the Loctite 641.

    In any case, I liked the idea of using the contact cleaner instead as previously recommended. Hopefully, it is as good if not better at the job.

    I've gone ahead and re-assembled my cranks. Now I have to wait 24 hours for the loctite 641 to cure, then I'll test them..

    BTW: While I had the crank out, I also cleaned and used anti-seize on the chainring bolts.

    Hopefully, the bottom bracket "creak" that was driving me crazy was either the crank arm or chainring bolts.

    Thanks to all that have offered their advice.

    Cheers,

    George

  37. #37
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    No good are you sure?

    Quote Originally Posted by caesar148
    ...snip...
    BTW, adding a little acetone to your gas tank will improve your vehicle's fuel economy ...
    That statement doesn't even make sense. Think about it - if it were true, wouldn't someone try to sell the gas with acetone already in it to make $?

    Here is some info: http://www.snopes.com/autos/techno/acetone.asp
    Last edited by debaucherous; 01-07-2011 at 02:24 PM.
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  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by bankerboy
    Key ingredient in nail polish remover. If you have wife, daughter, girlfriend or are a bit goth, you already have a bottle or two in your house.

    Yeah I'm well aware. I still don't use it on my bikes though.
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  39. #39
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    Some pictures for the curious

    Here are some pictures that might make it a bit clearer what exactly I was trying to do.

    The reason I took apart the cranks was to chase a creak. In the process I discovered that the previous installer used grease on the splines (a definite no-no and explicitly warned against by FSA for these cranks in their instructions).

    This was particularly painful because I had to special order loctite 641 from a local industrial supply house ($20). Hardware stores, auto part stores, and electronic shops don't carry it.

    Anyway, as I mentioned earlier, I hope this fixes my "creak".
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Humor:  How to NOT clean bike parts with acetone.-mtb1.jpg  

    Humor:  How to NOT clean bike parts with acetone.-mtb2.jpg  

    Humor:  How to NOT clean bike parts with acetone.-mtb3.jpg  

    Humor:  How to NOT clean bike parts with acetone.-mtb4.jpg  


  40. #40
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    Funny...

    Quote Originally Posted by chrishei1
    i normally just put a little MEK (Methyl Ethyl Ketone) in a spray bottle and go to town on my whole bike makes my grips nice and tacky
    But, now you are trolling.
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  41. #41
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    The key to using "nasty" chemicals is to protect yourself while you use them. Use chemical proof gloves,work in a well ventilated area or wear a respirator. Safty glasses would probally be a good idea also. A little common sense goes a long way.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fix the Spade
    You misread my comment entirely.

    My advice was to use Isopropyl alcohol, acetone is not for cleaning.

    Regards acetone itself, see comment #22
    I am well aware of it's many (many many) health risks.
    But, if used for the right tasks and treated with appropriate respect, acetone is completely harmless, it will never try to mug you down a back alley or attack the postman. The problems begin with the workman, not the tool.
    ha, my comment wasnt directed at you Spade it was just a generalization, and you assume that I or others here have never been mugged by a chemical in a dark alley, I find this hurtful and very assumptive on your part, as do the rest of who live in the silent shame of having been acosted by Acetone, or any of its running buddies...
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  43. #43
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    no grease on crank splines? I've always done it on my Shimano cranks and not had a problem...why would they specify no grease there and do they spec loctite on the splines?

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by mellowdave
    I find this hurtful and very assumptive on your part.
    My apologies, I wasn't aware that Acetone had moved up (down?) in the solvent gangs pecking order. I guess it's friend Acetylene been being a bad influence, hope you make a quick recovery.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by EJ_92606
    no grease on crank splines? I've always done it on my Shimano cranks and not had a problem...why would they specify no grease there and do they spec loctite on the splines?
    "Grease" on crank splines and other bike related components is an old school way of preventing dis-similar metals from galling or siezing together. The term grease is a little misleading however. Grease is a lubricant. For the purpose of preventing galling, anti-sieze would be far better.
    But in the last decade, the market has been flooded with a number of products that are far superior to anti-sieze in their ability to prevent galling and improve the holding grip on cylindrical and splined components.
    Locktite 641 Is a light duty retaining compound that will prevent the softer aluminum splines on the cranks from moving around and wearing out on the harder steel splines of the bottom bracket spindle. Its breakaway yield is low enough to allow the cranks to be dis-assembled for repairs.
    Locktite 609 is a product that I use everyday at work (troubleshooting and repairing industrial diesel engines). It is similar to 641, but much higher in strength.
    Caterpillar Retaining Compound, p/n 4C-9507 is another high strength retaining comound. The Caterpillar product and 609 are usefull in the cycling world for retaining bearings in place in hub bodies or bottom brackets. Also usefull when pressing headset cups into head tubes.
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  46. #46
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    Slightly OT, but is it totally crazy to use brake parts cleaner to clean a chain and RD pulleys? I know I used to use it to clean just about every car part known to man since it leaves zero residue, so it makes sense that it would work well on a bike drivetrain too. Any input is appreciated!
    I like beer.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by dblvanos
    I use acetone to clean rubber scuff marks off the hull of my boat. Not in love with the smell but a small dab with a rag and the marks come right off.
    I use acetone to dissolve fiberglass & clean my rollers and chop gun. Be careful where you use it on your boat.
    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Ninja's Son
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  48. #48
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    "Creak" is gone!

    A followup:

    I took my bike for a test ride after reassembling the cranks and my "creak" is gone. I used to get it when climbing with high torque on the pedals. I figured it was coming from the bottom bracket area since I'd hear the creak regardless of whether I was standing or seated, and regardless of pressure on the handle bars. I had already checked the pedals, spokes and wheel quick releases.

    In any case, no more creak and I rode up several steep hills. YEAH!!!!

    I attribute the "fix" to one of three things I did:

    1) Loctite 641 on the crank spindle splines (v.s. grease before)
    2) Anti-seize applied to the chainring bolts (no grease that I could detect)
    3) Anti-seize applied to the bottom bracket shell threads (v.s. greased before, and over torqued)

    I also made sure I used the correct torque settings during reassembly.

    I "tested" the loctite 641 on a bolt just to see how strong the hold was and how quickly it would cure. Yes, I know loctite 641 isn't a thread locker, but I didn't have another set of crank arms to test it on!

    After about 24 hours I disassembled the bolt and was impressed how much holding power the loctite had. Note how the loctite only "cured" in the areas where the nut and bolt sealed the threads. When exposed to air, loctite won't cure (or does so very slowly). This property is called "anaerobic" curing. Interesting stuff that I didn't know before.

    I hope the creak doesn't come back and if I were to place a bet, I think the loctite 641 was the real fix of the three above.

    Back to riding!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Humor:  How to NOT clean bike parts with acetone.-mtbr5.jpg  


  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brewtality
    "Grease" on crank splines and other bike related components is an old school way of preventing dis-similar metals from galling or siezing together. The term grease is a little misleading however. Grease is a lubricant. For the purpose of preventing galling, anti-sieze would be far better.
    But in the last decade, the market has been flooded with a number of products that are far superior to anti-sieze in their ability to prevent galling and improve the holding grip on cylindrical and splined components.
    Locktite 641 Is a light duty retaining compound that will prevent the softer aluminum splines on the cranks from moving around and wearing out on the harder steel splines of the bottom bracket spindle. Its breakaway yield is low enough to allow the cranks to be dis-assembled for repairs.
    Locktite 609 is a product that I use everyday at work (troubleshooting and repairing industrial diesel engines). It is similar to 641, but much higher in strength.
    Caterpillar Retaining Compound, p/n 4C-9507 is another high strength retaining comound. The Caterpillar product and 609 are usefull in the cycling world for retaining bearings in place in hub bodies or bottom brackets. Also usefull when pressing headset cups into head tubes.
    Great info. thanks. Can I find loctite 641 at Home Depot or Lowe's?

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by EJ_92606
    Great info. thanks. Can I find loctite 641 at Home Depot or Lowe's?
    Not likely.
    Try Grainger or Napa can possibly order it in.
    Its all Shits and Giggles until somebody Giggles and Shits

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickav21
    Slightly OT, but is it totally crazy to use brake parts cleaner to clean a chain and RD pulleys? I know I used to use it to clean just about every car part known to man since it leaves zero residue, so it makes sense that it would work well on a bike drivetrain too. Any input is appreciated!
    It will work, but its highly ineffecient. A can of brake clean is what? $4 - $5? And you might need a new can every time you clean your chain. Brake clean is very hazardous to paint, as well as any rubber or plastic parts. Most RD pulleys are some form of plastic. It would be a real shame to spray down you RD pulleys and then watch them melt away

    A can of mineral spirits and an empty paint can is about $10. Pour half the can of mineral spirits into the paint can. Soak your chain, cassette, chainrings, whatever, in the mineral spirits. Then rinse off with water. The one can will last for years.
    Its all Shits and Giggles until somebody Giggles and Shits

  52. #52
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    Also try Fastenal

    Quote Originally Posted by Brewtality
    Not likely.
    Try Grainger or Napa can possibly order it in.
    I got my loctite 641 from Fastenal. The local store didn't stock it, but was kind enough to order it for me at no extra cost (it just took a week for them to get it).

    You can also order it on Amazon.

  53. #53
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    So, it sounds like electrical contact cleaner could be used as a good general parts cleaner in places you don't want residue and need a quick dry.

    I'm thinking: good for cleaning fork parts during a fork rebuild. Thoughts?

    Just trying to confirm this stuff will be safe on all my fork bits and pieces.

  54. #54
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    As a final degreaser and cleaner you want to be using a Rubbing alcohol and preferably the ethyl alcohol kind as the body can handle it in small doses.

  55. #55
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    I use acetone for most applications that demands a solvent, its the safest solvent there is except water and ethanol. And ethanol usually works like crap. Acetone is produced in your body as we speak...

    LD50 for acetone is more than 2 gram/kg if you drink it.
    Isoprop is 5 gram though.


    Toxicology

    Acetone is believed to exhibit only slight toxicity in normal use, and there is no strong evidence of chronic health effects if basic precautions are followed.[14]

    At very high vapor concentrations, acetone is irritating and, like many other solvents, may depress the central nervous system. It is also a severe irritant on contact with eyes, and a potential pulmonary aspiration risk. In one documented case, ingestion of a substantial amount of acetone led to systemic toxicity, although the patient eventually fully recovered.[15] Some sources estimate LD50 for human ingestion at 1.159 g/kg; LD50 inhalation by mice is given as 44 g/m3, over 4 hours.[16]

    Acetone has been shown to have anticonvulsant effects in animal models of epilepsy, in the absence of toxicity, when administered in millimolar concentrations.[17] It has been hypothesized that the high-fat low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet used clinically to control drug-resistant epilepsy in children works by elevating acetone in the brain.[17]

    * EPA EPCRA Delisting (1995). EPA removed acetone from the list of “toxic chemicals” maintained under Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act (EPCRA). In making that decision, EPA conducted an extensive review of the available toxicity data on acetone and found that acetone “exhibits acute toxicity only at levels that greatly exceed releases and resultant exposures,” and further that acetone “exhibits low toxicity in chronic studies.”

    * Genotoxicity. Acetone has been tested in more than two dozen in vitro and in vivo assays. These studies indicate that acetone is not genotoxic.

    * Carcinogenicity. EPA in 1995 concluded, “There is currently no evidence to suggest a concern for carcinogenicity.”(EPCRA Review, described in Section 3.3). NTP scientists have recommended against chronic toxicity/carcinogenicity testing of acetone because “the prechronic studies only demonstrated a very mild toxic response at very high doses in rodents.”

    * Neurotoxicity and Developmental Neurotoxicity. The neurotoxic potential of both acetone and isopropanol, the metabolic precursor of acetone, have been extensively studied. These studies demonstrate that although exposure to high doses of acetone may cause transient central nervous system effects, acetone is not a neurotoxicant. A guideline developmental neurotoxicity study has been conducted with isopropanol, and no developmental neurotoxic effects were identified, even at the highest dose tested. (SIAR, pp. 1, 25, 31).

    * Environmental. When the EPA exempted acetone from regulation as a volatile organic compound (VOC) in 1995, EPA stated that this exemption would “contribute to the achievement of several important environmental goals and would support EPA’s pollution prevention efforts.” 60 Fed. Reg. 31,634 (June 16, 1995). 60 Fed. Reg. 31,634 (June 16, 1995). EPA noted that acetone could be used “as a substitute for several compounds that are listed as hazardous air pollutants (HAP) under section 112 of the [Clean Air] Act.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  56. #56
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    Back when I was a fireman, we had a fella burn his house down. Was stripping furniture in the house when the acetone fumes found a way into the furnace and proceeded to ignite and burn the house down. He got out okay.

  57. #57
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    I mix acetone with soap to clean my hands after working with my bike, works much better than ethanol and soap, I use a 1:1 ratio or so, it works really well. Plastic grain soap is better though.

    I have not found that paint stripping ability of it, possibly it works on watercolors?? I did however experience a bit of boosting to my dichloromethane stripper (serious cancer ultra edition) when I added some acetone. I read this did wonders ina pdf about paint stripping and it did. Acetone will stain/melt some types of (crap) plastics though.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  58. #58
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    acetone...
    the original baggy high!
    "Be not afraid of going slowly but only of standing still." - Chinese Proverb

  59. #59
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    propper chain cleaning

    Quote Originally Posted by car bone View Post
    I mix acetone with soap to clean my hands after working with my bike, works much better than ethanol and soap, I use a 1:1 ratio or so, it works really well. Plastic grain soap is better though.

    I have not found that paint stripping ability of it, possibly it works on watercolors?? I did however experience a bit of boosting to my dichloromethane stripper (serious cancer ultra edition) when I added some acetone. I read this did wonders ina pdf about paint stripping and it did. Acetone will stain/melt some types of (crap) plastics though.
    im going to layout what i have learned and the equipment i used it on.

    8 speed
    shimano 11x26 cassette
    sram 8 speed chain wih q link
    shimano xt h II crank dual
    sram x7 derailure w tacx pulleys

    run chain cleaner till fliud stays clear. usualy 2 to 4 sessions
    wipe down drivetrain
    spin chain back ward and use dawn liquid dish soap
    take chain off and wipe drow drive train again but more detailed.
    put chain in a metal container and add 1/2 cup of acetone.
    shake lightly 5 times and let sit for 5 mins. shake and drain.
    wipe off and install chain on bike
    let dry at least 30 mins.

    add finishline a wet dry teflon lube.
    be generous and wipe off extra
    do this 3 times
    let sit for 10 mins

    ride.

    this is the best result for removing the shipping grease Also.
    what you can see is not thats important, its what is inside the rollers that matter most.

    the hidden 3 demensional bearing they use.

    or

    clean the chain rings and cassette thuroughly and slap on a new chain and ride it till it starts to grind. repeat.

    i fave all the above methods depending on the application.

    thanks.

  60. #60
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    part 2

    Quote Originally Posted by mjs1231 View Post
    im going to layout what i have learned and the equipment i used it on.

    8 speed
    shimano 11x26 cassette
    sram 8 speed chain wih q link
    shimano xt h II crank dual
    sram x7 derailure w tacx pulleys

    run chain cleaner till fliud stays clear. usualy 2 to 4 sessions
    wipe down drivetrain
    spin chain back ward and use dawn liquid dish soap
    take chain off and wipe drow drive train again but more detailed.
    put chain in a metal container and add 1/2 cup of acetone.
    shake lightly 5 times and let sit for 5 mins. shake and drain.
    wipe off and install chain on bike
    let dry at least 30 mins.

    add finishline a wet dry teflon lube.
    be generous and wipe off extra
    do this 3 times
    let sit for 10 mins

    ride.

    this is the best result for removing the shipping grease Also.
    what you can see is not thats important, its what is inside the rollers that matter most.

    the hidden 3 demensional bearing they use.

    or

    clean the chain rings and cassette thuroughly and slap on a new chain and ride it till it starts to grind. repeat.

    i fave all the above methods depending on the application.

    thanks.
    forgot

    once the chain is stripped it wears fast.

    i think the chains were made to be a tho away part.

    best performance will be a dry lube
    best longivity will be oe grease/wax

    best way is up to you.

  61. #61
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    My chaincleaning consists of this now:

    First soak and shake in white spirit.
    then acetone to get the white spirit off
    then I spray it with starting gas (diethyl ether 50% or so)

    now the chain is ultra clean

    then i soak it and shake it in mix or hydraulic oil/motor oil/some synthetic grease/molycoat/copper paste/teflon containing oil/crc 556

    done.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  62. #62
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    For things like that I use camping fuel. It's less aggressive than acetone, doesn't dissolve plastic or paint during short term use, and evaporates immediately leaving no residue.
    Screw the shuttle, I'm riding to the top. You're all worthless and weak!!!

  63. #63
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    Dear god.

    Use a bucket, long-bristle brush and dish soap. Anything that you can take off (shimano hollowtech cranks) can be easily cleaned with the same. The only difference at the bike shop was that we'd throw parts in a parts-washer, but really you can get the same effect by just cleaning by hand with soap and water. The benefit of the parts washer is we could do other stuff while the parts were being washed.

    I do have some orange bulk degreaser, but that's rare for me to use. Otherwise, just soap and water and a long brush that can get in the nooks and crannys.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  64. #64
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    Acetone works great for removing glue residue after you peel off stickers.

  65. #65
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    Having not read any responses in this thread but just the original post. My question is how old is the OP. I mean really isn't this something you learn as a pre teen and a teenager at the latest. Putting a solvent in a plastic cup. Really!
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffw-13 View Post
    Get yourself a can of brake cleaner at the local auto parts store.
    I'll second that. I had an old cassette that was super dull and nasty. Took it off and sprayed some brake cleaner on it. 30 seconds later, there was black watery stuff that dripped onto the ground and the cassette looked new.

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