Results 1 to 61 of 61
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,950

    How often do you buy a new bike?

    How often do you buy a new bike and what's the typical depreciate hit (assuming you sell your old one)?

    I buy one every 3 years or so. Typically spend about $2.5k on new bikes and depreciates about a grand after 4-5 years.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,488
    I bought a new mountain bike 10 years ago. Everything since then has been a constantly evolving version of that same bike. Six or seven frames, four or five wheels, four forks, a dozen handlebars, three or four cranksets. Never the same bike for more than six months but always the same bike.

    I bought stuff more frequently when I worked in a bike shop, ironically when I made a lot less money. Never paid more than $600 for a frame. Always bought what seemed like the best value for long term durability and future-proof compatibility. I can't even imagine justifying a $2500 bike at the rate they depreciate and succumb to planned obsolescence.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    721
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    I bought a new mountain bike 10 years ago. Everything since then has been a constantly evolving version of that same bike. Six or seven frames, four or five wheels, four forks, a dozen handlebars, three or four cranksets. Never the same bike for more than six months but always the same bike.
    Brings to mind an interesting philosophical question: when does it stop being the same bike?

  4. #4
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    24,373
    Depends. Has been as short as 1yr. Has been as long as 11yrs. I don't always sell the old one, either.

    I just bought a frame (used) for a new build about a month ago. Not selling anything to make room for it or to fund the build. Bought my last bike about 4yrs ago.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,488
    Quote Originally Posted by TwiceHorn View Post
    Brings to mind an interesting philosophical question: when does it stop being the same bike?
    All the time, and never. It's a paradox!

  6. #6
    slow
    Reputation: sgltrak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5,606
    The last time I bought a brand new bike was 1993, when I was working in a shop and got an employee deal. Many years ago when I worked in bike shops I would sell my prior year's bike for the same price as whatever I was buying for the next season, so I never suffered any depreciation.

    Since then my bikes have been evolving, much like Mack's. I have bought two used bikes in the past year for well below their original retail value, prefering to let someone else take the depreciation hit. Both of those recent purchases have already been through a fork change and at least one or two wheel set changes, as well as some crank and drivetrain mods and the usual seatpost, saddle, pedal, stem, and handlebar personalization. Hard to determine when the bike stops being the same bike.
    Last edited by sgltrak; 11-08-2018 at 01:55 PM. Reason: spelling typo

  7. #7
    One ring to mash them all
    Reputation: the one ring's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    1,101
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    All the time, and never. It's a paradox!
    Schrödinger's bike!
    ITMFA

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,950
    Interesting responses so far especially with the bikes evolving. Do you always get deals on parts (or buy 2nd hand)? I know the parts can add up quick.

    I love my youngest bike (2016) and have upgraded/ customized a decent amount. But since it's non-boost and I'd like to eventually upgrade the wheels, I'm torn on whether non-boost will make the wheelset obsolete with new frames these days.

    I usually try to get bikes on closeout so the depreciation isn't as much. Even with the initial expense, I figure t's a lot cheaper than a gym membership or my other hobby - riding stand up jet skis.

  9. #9
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    24,373
    Quote Originally Posted by bank5 View Post
    Interesting responses so far especially with the bikes evolving. Do you always get deals on parts (or buy 2nd hand)? I know the parts can add up quick.

    I usually try to get bikes on closeout so the depreciation isn't as much. Even with the initial expense, I figure t's a lot cheaper than a gym membership or my other hobby - riding stand up jet skis.
    Sometimes I do, sometimes not. I used to be willing to go gray market, but not anymore, with the risk of counterfeits and no warranty and such. I would rather just buy used.

    For my current build, it will have a mix of stuff on it. Some full retail, some used, some online deals, some limited access deals, etc. I don't have much of a parts bin, so it won't really have anything that was on a previous bike of mine.

    Depreciation isn't really a factor for me, since my goal is to keep it for a long time. I also happen to ride one of the most popular sizes, so it is rare for me to find closeouts on anything I want.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  10. #10
    Pro Crastinator
    Reputation: .WestCoastHucker.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,293
    Quote Originally Posted by bank5 View Post
    Typically spend about $2.5k on new bikes and depreciates about a grand after 4-5 years.
    after 4 years you slang a 2.5k bike for 1.5k? gtfo with that. ripoff artist. you bike is barely worth that after you ride it at all...


  11. #11
    Hardtail Steel Forever
    Reputation: jestep's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    1,774
    I don't buy new bikes at all, ever, in history, and I say the same for cars because it's just burning money with how fast things depreciate. The 2 most recent bikes/frame's I've purchased, both in the past 4 years, are a 2012 SC BLT2 and a 1996 Voodoo Djab which is a SS now. Both are my go to bikes depending on what/how I want to ride. Unless I move back to Colorado which I've considered a + or fat bike, I don't really have any intention on buying something else until I break one of these.
    WTB: Med Bontrager Ti Lite, PM Me...

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ghettocruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,530
    For MTBs, 8-10 years

    Depreciation is total, so I try to track $/km since I often use my bikes for general transportation. Oddly, they usually bottom-out at about $0.25/km almost regardless of the initial cost, as drivetrain and consumable replacements take over as the driver of costs vs the initial investment.

    I too have been spooked out of the used market after seeing how convincing some knock-off parts look. Fine for water bottle cages, not happening for frames and handlebars.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,950
    Quote Originally Posted by .WestCoastHucker. View Post
    after 4 years you slang a 2.5k bike for 1.5k? gtfo with that. ripoff artist. you bike is barely worth that after you ride it at all...
    I typically get the bike on closeout (~30-40% off), so it's more like a $3.5k bike. And I often put some $ into it with upgrades. But selling a used bike for over a grand can be a PITA.

  14. #14
    jcd's best friend
    Reputation: Battery's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    1,409
    Hard to say with bikes these days. I was in the market for a Gen 1 Santa Cruz Bronson but everyone wanted well over $2k for their bikes on Pink Bike. I was finding some lower end Gen 2's for that price, both new and used!
    Trek Emonda | Transition Sentinel

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BlueCheesehead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    1,029
    I typically buy used. My last two bikes were purchased 1-2 years old at 60% savings off new. I ride about 300 hrs/year and between my 3 bikes I may experience $200/year depreciation total.

  16. #16
    Barely in control
    Reputation: Schulze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    2,008
    One every couple of years but this year I've bought three. I also broke two so that is a net +1 lol.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    424
    I buy way less often than I want----currently on a 2016 Pivot 429T and would like a new bike but having trouble finding one to fit my needs----seems enduro is the new thing and I need a mid travel 29er and the new models are not enough different---So I will buy when I find one.
    I expect to get less than 50% of what I paid for the Pivot---I see crazy asking prices on craigslist and pinkbike ---but I think reality is used bikes are not worth much

  18. #18
    Snow Dog
    Reputation: sXeXBMXer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    2,180
    I have had 4 bikes in my life:
    1. 1981 Mongoose Supergoose - bought with saved up lawn mowing money
    2. 1987 Mongoose Californian Pro - bought with money from working at Bob Evans
    3. 1994 Trek Mountain Track 830 - bought with money from teaching drum lessons
    4. 2015 Surly krampus - bought with tax return

    still have all but the Supergoose, which was stolen from our garage, so depreciation was sort of irrelevant to me
    " ...the moonlit swamp Krampus is a king among bikes." - geraldooka

    15 Surly Krampus
    LET IT SNOW!

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    3,365
    Typically every two seasons. I spare no expense in my builds and buy what I want. With that I'll buy parts over the winter and shop the best deals I can find for my builds. This makes a BIG difference in the build for the same cost as a high end factory offering. I'm really happy with my current bike and will be strapping some new parts on over the winter. I ride a lot over the summer season and just parts/wear and tear will go $800-$1200. My summer life basically revolves around mountain biking so I try to get the most out of it while my body is still functioning as it should.

    Currently I'm debating building a mid fat or fat bike to try and get in some winter miles. That idea is competing with a new split board kit or possibly even cross country skis which I've never done short of getting up the mtn. I'm a fair weather rider but need to find something engaging over the winter to stay sane. The gym just doesn't cut it anymore and I'm done with resort skiing/snowboarding.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,561
    I have a 2011 and my new bike is a 2014. I don't plan on getting anything new for a long time. Also
    both of my frames were made in the USA.

  21. #21
    Thinking about riding.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    1,581
    New bike every year, one of the benefits of working at a shop. With the discount I can usually break even... But based off MSRP I'm depreciating it nearly 50% after just one year of riding.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Uwibami's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    208
    The wife and myself have been riding for the last year and a half. 10 bikes during that time from a 400.00 Electra to a 7200.00 Kona and all in between. still have 7 of the 10

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    154
    Well I just started biking this year but so far I have bought a 6KU single speed (road bike), built (out of mostly used parts) a Sunday Soundwave (BMX), bought and sold a Cannondale Trail5 and bought a used Niner WFO9. About to buy a hardtail in Dec/Jan (Nukeproof Scout).

    After that I think I will be done for a while other then some upgrades to the hardtail, BMX and 6KU. I built the BMX to last me a long time and 6KU does everything I need from a road bike. The only thing I want is a vintage cruiser built klunker style.

  24. #24
    Super Moderator SuperModerator
    Reputation: AVL-MTB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    1,864
    My last purchase was in November 2014. I recently sold it and going to buy a new FS today or tomorrow. I've been wanting a FS for a while, so I'm pulling the trigger after riding hardtails or rigids for my entire life.


    My next purchase will be a gravel bike hopefully. Hoping to race next year on gravel roads.

    With that I said, I tend to keep my bikes for a long time.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Rock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    656
    Every 5 years.

    I buy new and do not worry about depreciation on a toy. I don't buy bikes based off of selling them, only riding them.
    How can anyone who's been riding as long as I have, be so slow???

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    3,365
    Quote Originally Posted by Rock View Post
    I don't buy bikes based off of selling them, only riding them.
    No doubt.
    I usually make my buds with less disposable income or not as into riding a good deal on my bikes. This has really helped several of them get more into riding and has helped me with a wider array of reliable people to ride with. Sometimes value goes beyond monetary.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dbhammercycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,180
    I'd say I avg a new bike to me every 5 years, give or take. Some last longer, some shorter. I probably tinker with them all and sell some parts to keep the bin reasonable. I never buy new at the moment of release. I tend to buy sale, NOS, discounted or used parts. I've only had one 10spd. Everything I currently have or maintain is 9spd or SS and possibly swapable. I have the desire, but neither the funds nor the head nod from the wife. I do what I can with what I got. It's just how I roll.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,488
    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    No doubt.
    I usually make my buds with less disposable income or not as into riding a good deal on my bikes. This has really helped several of them get more into riding and has helped me with a wider array of reliable people to ride with. Sometimes value goes beyond monetary.
    yes! I don't have enough disposable income to buy new bikes, but I have benefited from buying gear from other riders. we have a local forum with a "pay it forward" thread where we post gear and non-bike that we don't need. in turn, as my career has advanced, I have felt more free to give away stuff that I am not using. I used to be the one always jumping on freebies but lately I have been giving more back than accepting donations. it comes full-circle eventually and the young, broke rider to whom you gave some half-used up tires becomes the biggest trail advocate and trail buddy in a year or two.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Crankout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2,818
    Not enough apparently.
    You can't get a suntan on the moon...

  30. #30
    Bikesexual
    Reputation: jcd46's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    6,147
    I've gone a little crazy, and have 5. The SS which IF the girlfriend continues her interest in riding, it will be hers. 92 GT Karakoram that its in the works ($40 bucks I think I paid at a yard sale)

    The 3 on my signature get all the mileage, however, I'm still want a steel HT. I've been pondering selling my Heckler but that's a tough call.

    I also don't care about re-sale too much, since I've finally have my stable as I want it.
    The Steel Fleet:


    '14 All City MMD
    '12 Kona Unit Rigid
    TBA - There is a hint in the Purchase thread

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    7,379
    Quote Originally Posted by TwiceHorn View Post
    Brings to mind an interesting philosophical question: when does it stop being the same bike?
    Frame change.
    Sinister Bikes
    Wraith Bicycles
    Sunday River Mtn Bike Park
    NEMBA
    Wachusett Brewing Co.

  32. #32
    the discerning hooligan
    Reputation: MOJO K's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,142
    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    Frame change.
    This is actually the rule in racing, right?
    MERCY! MERCY! MERCY!

  33. #33
    EMBA Member
    Reputation: Ladmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,874
    Bought my bike in 2012. The frame has resisted all attempts I've made to break it. I need to try harder evidently, but until then, I expect I'm just gonna keep on keepin on.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Arebee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    650
    I bought an entry-level hardtail in 2012 strictly because it was what I could afford at the time ($1,100 budget). It was my first bike in 20 years, but I only rode off and on over the last 15 years or so.

    I built up the 2012 with a lot of new components over the last six years, added a dropper, upgraded the fork, wheels, bars, 1x drivetrain, etc. It's a fun bike on a really solid frame, but I just bought a full suspension bike last week. I'm really looking forward to a softer ride in the rooty, rocky New England terrain that I ride.

    I plan on putting studded tires on the hardtail and using it as a winter beater.
    AreBee

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation: natas1321's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    357
    Every year, but this year I ended up purchasing two but hopefully I'll hold off for the next two to three years.

    Sent from my HTC One M9 using Tapatalk

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SteveF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    2,190
    More often than I should, less often than I'd like.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Bradym77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    152
    Usually every couple years I will get the "itch" and start looking. I figure out how much I can get for my current bike and base my search on what's out there on that. Sell the current bike and buy the new one. So in regards to mountain bikes I've always been a one quiver bike guy.

    Still have my road bike and bmx to play on and have never upgraded those for last 5-6yrs with no plans to either.

    Thankfully I'm at the point now where I'm able to keep my plus hard tail and also add an Ibis Mojo HD3 to the family! It will be delivered tomorrow!

  38. #38
    Life's a Garden, dig it!
    Reputation: chuckha62's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    3,129
    New bike? I buy old frames that I like and build them the way I want.
    Why Johnny Ringo, you look like someone just walked over your grave.

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cbr6fs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    158
    Unless you in that tiny tiny percentage of MTBers that race, have a good chance of winning and are not sponsored, i don't see the point of all this "new kit mania"

    Surely the vast vast majority of us ride because we enjoy it

    I've ridden brand new bikes friends have lent me, for sure i climbed faster on some, descended faster on others, but when i sat and thought about it my level of enjoyment hadn't gone up, or if it did it wasn't in relation to the amount of money i'd need to spend.

    I bought a Diamond Back Axis TT back in 1994, 3x8 speed, no shocks, no suspension forks, did everything i needed until a injury meant i needed something more stable

    2006 i bought a Trek EX7, 3x9 speed, as consumables wore out if stuff was on sale i'd upgrade, so it's mostly older XT components, added a dropper seat post, again it helps with my injury.

    I think we are bombarded by various media that "new version" is noticeably and exponentially better
    In magazines and on-line media these companies are paying the bills from adverts they are running by companies that are supplying products to them for testing
    So of course they need to hyperbole these products
    Maybe they'll point out some problems with a few in the test, but if you read each yearly review of new bikes, they're always better than the last years but a noticeable amount

    This since MTBing started to become popular in the early 90's
    Yet a mid 90's fully rigid bike will hold it's own against a 2018 fully rigid bike, this in the real world

    Forums don't help either
    When bikes and components cost as much as they do, buyers will feel the need to justify this cost to their peers (other forum members), so again hyperbole will kick off again

    For me it's about enjoying riding my bike
    I don't care if that's a 12 year old 26" 3x9 or a $8k 2018 29" 1x12
    It just doesn't make THAT much of a difference to the feeling i get when i ride my bike
    1994 Fully Rigid Diamond Back Axis TT
    2009 Trek Fuel Ex 7

  40. #40
    Rollin' a fatty Moderator
    Reputation: DiRt DeViL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,820
    Until a while ago had more than one bike and buying and selling was part of the deal, had specific use bikes like DH, AM, XC and SS so changing parts or bikes was usual; now only have one, a fat bike.

    Since getting the fatty sold the 29er and that's the bike I ride year long on any trail and condition. Having said that wouldn't be surprised if at least a frame change happens in the near future but components will be replaced as they wear out or break.

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,488
    Quote Originally Posted by cbr6fs View Post
    Yet a mid 90's fully rigid bike will hold it's own against a 2018 fully rigid bike, this in the real world
    While I agree that the industry and the fanbois of whatever new thing comes along overstate things to justify unnecessary purchases, I think you statement above is quite hyperbolic as well. Anyone can chose the subjective experience they have on any bike, but newer bikes are definitely easier to have fun on. Unless you're a total loon, the advancements made over time make bikes more fun. It's just that the period of time that must pass before you're ready to move on is subjective and individual.

    That does not mean that you should throw your whole bike in the trash every six months, but there's a point that takes less than a decade when the cummulative effects of incremental change make older bikes just not very interesting. I am certain that I would have a miserable time trying to ride my local trails on a 20 year old rigid bike with a 3x8 drivetrain, but a 10 year old hardtail with 9 speed drivetrain and a functioning suspension fork would be fun.

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    8
    See my sig line...
    I buy a bike about every 10 years...I guess I'm overdue...

  43. #43
    Thinking about riding.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    1,581
    Quote Originally Posted by cbr6fs View Post
    I've ridden brand new bikes friends have lent me, for sure i climbed faster on some, descended faster on others, but when i sat and thought about it my level of enjoyment hadn't gone up, or if it did it wasn't in relation to the amount of money i'd need to spend.
    That plus the impact spending that money will have on your finances is all that matters. At the end of the day, riding is fun but not when it means you gotta eat rice and beans to make it happen. If that's the case ride what you can.

    That said, new bikes ARE better. I'm lucky enough to get a new one each year since I work at a shop and they really are improving almost every year. Again, nothing worth putting yourself in unmanageable debt over but that doesn't mean they aren't improving.

    Not to mention, a big part of why I get a new bike every year (other than just because I can) is because it keeps me on new stuff with full warranties. I don't think I'd mind riding a bike that's a couple years old in terms of the technology or geometry... But I would have a much harder time affording all the repairs I'd be doing.

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,245
    I buy a new bike every time my current one breaks. Which is about every 3 years, The last 3 bikes have been aluminum...I moved to carbon not to save weight, but to hopefully have a longer lasting frame. Luckily don't pay full price due to being an OK enduro racer.

  45. #45
    No known cure
    Reputation: Vader's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,643
    Both bikes are custom frames and are almost ten years old. The steel single speed will last forever. The full suspension will eventually break and that's when it will be time for another, although I won't need to go the custom route as the geometry is now common.
    Ripping trails and tipping ales

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JoePAz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    4,824
    Hmm my bike history is a bit sorted

    1998 my first proper Mtn bike. Entry Level, but solid.
    2003. Built from new parts my first "dream bike" 26HT, light aluminm frame XT everything, rim brakes.
    2004 - 2012 - Stopped riding as I started a family.
    2012 started riding again on my "old" 26"HT.
    2013 - Used 2001 Trek Road bike. Cheap carbon road bike to experiment on the road.
    2012-2015 - Rode the crap out of my 26er and loved it, but started considering upgrading late in 2015
    Feb 2016 - Moved to 29er HT (Used 2012 Highball) Wow what a difference. Still similar character, but nicer in every way.
    April 2016 - used 2013 Santa Cruz Solo (5010). My first FS trail bike and I wanted it to explore stuff the HT could not do well. - I still have this bike, but only have 900 miles on it.
    Sept 2016 - Traded for used 26HT SS. I had been playing with SS on my geared HT, but wanted a proper SS.
    Dec 2016 - Bought used Vassago Verhauen - Steel Single speed. 29" wheels, Steel Frame, Single speed? Yes please!
    March 2018 - Replaced the Highball (after some 3000 miles) with Specialized Epic. I wanted more plush bike for long 4-8 hr races/rides, but needed the climbing efficiency similar to my Highball. The 5010 was too heavy and burly for long rides and big climbs. The Epic is just the right mix. I bought it new and really is my 2nd "dream bike" since my first was in 2003. The other bikes were the right opportunity at the right time for the right price. This was planned and fully customized after the purchase to make it exactly why I wanted. I already have 1200 miles on it with numerous 4+hr races and rides. It almost feels like cheating on this bike, but as they say "it never gets easier you just go faster".
    June 2018 - Replace my 2001 Trek after 6000 miles of my use with Specialized Venge 1 year old demo from the same shop as my Epic. Was looking to get to a new generation road bike and was ready to buy new, but this deal came up. Disc brakes, carbon frame, carbon wheels. Pretty nice set-up and I plan to keep this bike for many many years.

    So I still ride the 5010 on occasion,but the SS, Epic and Road bike are all part of my normal rotation. They get ridden at least once in a two week period, but the split can vary depending on weather, season and events for the weekend. My highball is sold away. The Trek is waiting to get sold. My 26er from 2003 is up on the wall in the garage and my 26" SS was sold away.

    For now I don't see any need to replace anything. I like the mix of bikes I have and what they do. 2 are basiclly new and 2 are a bit old. My Vassago is very adaptable and I just moved from 29 to 29+ rigid on that just to change it up a bit. My 5010 is a bit long in the tooth, but a nice all day ride down Mt Lemmon a few weeks back on some of the most gnarly terrain I have ridden ever showed that is still a good match for what I want to do. I upgraded to 35mm wheels with 2.6 tires and a 1x11 drivetrain. The HA is a bit steep at 68.5, but with the dropper post can still handle quite a lot. If rode it a ton I might consider upgrading to a 29er, but given the number of miles I ride I don't see the point. It still takes me where I want to go at a pace that acceptable given my friends 29er Enduro who is the guy I tend to do my big gnar riding with.

    So I don't upgrade bikes just to upgrade unless they are really old as it he case with my road bike or there is something missing in my riding spectrum that I need to address.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  47. #47
    Always in the wrong gear
    Reputation: Impetus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    2,272
    I buy a new bike when the current one cant meet my needs:
    I built a 1998 Spec Stumpjumper M2 that I raced until military deployment and 'life' stopped my riding in 2003 until about 2011.
    I started riding again in 2011 but 26x2.1 wheels, an elastomer fork and 560mm bars was much less fun than I remember so I bought a used Haro X2 full suspension bike.

    It was too big, and when some guy offered me 200$ for the frame, I sold it and bought a Cannondale Prophet frame, and rebuilt it.
    I rode that bike on increasingly stupid terrain with my friends until one by one they all got hurt or moved, and I couldn't (wouldn't) do it by myself.
    In a matter of weeks I realized that a 150mm, 32# bike was not fun to ride on XC trails. It was 2012(?) and I was curious about 29ers, so I bought a "project" On-One ScandAl SS with a Reba fork, and within a few rides I was hooked on singlespeeding. After 6 months, my old C'Dale hadn't left the garage so I sold it for $800 and bought some fancy wheels and a nice handlebar.
    I rode it until a deal on a Vassago that would fit 29x3.0 tires came along.
    I rode that until I broke the frame, and crash-replacement'ed it into my current VerHauen, which I don't know if/when I'll replace.


    My next bike will probably be a custom steel or Ti bike, only because I'm irritated by my current bike's 27.2 seat tube, and (despite advertised) really only clears a 2.75 tire with the paragon sliders full forward. a 3.0 requires the sliders be in the 'long-half' or it rubs.

    I'd like to remedy those two things with a custom frame using a bigger seat tube, a 73mm bb and nice wide CS yoke.


    I haven't felt the itch to add a fancy FS bike to the garage yet.
    Don’t modify the trail to match your skills, modify your skills to match the trails.

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    360
    I have never bought a new mountain bike. Even when I worked for a bike shop and could get discounts. The bike that I wanted (2016 Fuse Expert Al) was never in stock as all of them were preordered by dealers and sold out really quickly. So I bought a used one. I honestly can't stand the idea of something depreciating. I usually buy a used bike every 3-4 months and try to make money on it. Part of the fun is the buying and selling.

    However, I am really considering spending more and getting a forever bike (more like a 3-4 year bike haha). Dropping $3000ish on a new 29er trail bike seems like the way to go.

  49. #49
    Trail Gnome
    Reputation: griz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    3,588
    The last time I purchased a complete, and brand new bicycle was in 1998. I just keep piecing them together...shit, my saddle is 15 years old.

  50. #50
    Meatbomb
    Reputation: Phillbo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    6,238
    About every 12 years...

  51. #51
    slow
    Reputation: sgltrak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5,606
    Quote Originally Posted by griz View Post
    I just keep piecing them together...shit, my saddle is 15 years old.
    My saddles have been old enough to drink legally in all 50 states for at least 4-5 years now.
    How often do you buy a new bike?-1202172217.jpg

  52. #52
    CEO Product Failure
    Reputation: bingemtbr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    971
    My road bike (Italian steel) and SS (also Italian steel) are liftetime/legacy purchases.

    My primary trail mtb gets completely replaced about every 5-6 years. It will get a new drive train about every 9mos, have the shocks serviced annually, and have some type of frame issue about every 12-18mos (I'm a clyde).

    My fatty's will be replaced when their frame's fail. I have the entry level Spec Fatboy (and love it). I cannot justify any upgrades until something fails.

    My racing HT does not see much use. Consequently it is only ridden 5-6 times a year and will likely become a legacy ride once its technology is obsolete.

  53. #53
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,321
    Over 12 years of mtb, I've owned 8 bikes

    6 all-mountain (2 for dh)
    1 dh (double crown)
    1 hard tail

    I currently ride 2 of those 8 bikes (the ht and am). The remainder 6 I either sold or donated.
    I don't have any immediate plans for replacing or adding this year.
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dbhammercycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,180
    Quote Originally Posted by sgltrak View Post
    My saddles have been old enough to drink legally in all 50 states for at least 4-5 years now.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	1202172217.jpg 
Views:	28 
Size:	97.7 KB 
ID:	1232599
    Haha, that is horrible. My inner thighs are sore and pants worn from just looking at those saddles.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  55. #55
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    33,108
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveF View Post
    More often than I should, less often than I'd like.
    That made my brain hurt.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  56. #56
    jcd's best friend
    Reputation: Battery's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    1,409
    I just bought my Sentinel a couple months ago. Is it bad that I'm shopping for a new/used 3rd bike now?
    Trek Emonda | Transition Sentinel

  57. #57
    Bikesexual
    Reputation: jcd46's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    6,147
    Quote Originally Posted by Battery View Post
    I just bought my Sentinel a couple months ago. Is it surprising that I'm shopping for a new/used 3rd bike now?
    Nope.
    The Steel Fleet:


    '14 All City MMD
    '12 Kona Unit Rigid
    TBA - There is a hint in the Purchase thread

  58. #58
    jcd's best friend
    Reputation: Battery's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    1,409
    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    Nope.
    Analog gravel bike perhaps?
    Trek Emonda | Transition Sentinel

  59. #59
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    16
    When I see one I want. Only restriction is space, I'm now on 7, so 1 in 1 out policy is enforced by the wife (who has 3...).

    Don't buy based on residual values, pretty much let the market decide what it want to pay for stuff. Last sale was a 4 year old Nomad mk3, bought on release day for £8k+, sold for £2.4k

  60. #60
    One ring to mash them all
    Reputation: the one ring's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    1,101
    Quote Originally Posted by sgltrak View Post
    My saddles have been old enough to drink legally in all 50 states for at least 4-5 years now.
    Looks more like they're a year or two out from penalty-free 401k withdrawal eligibility.
    ITMFA

  61. #61
    Bikesexual
    Reputation: jcd46's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    6,147
    Quote Originally Posted by Battery View Post
    Analog gravel bike perhaps?
    Hopefully, I want to see some of your videos on a rigid drop bar.
    The Steel Fleet:


    '14 All City MMD
    '12 Kona Unit Rigid
    TBA - There is a hint in the Purchase thread

Similar Threads

  1. How often do you buy a new bike?
    By epacheco3 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 06-08-2014, 07:07 AM
  2. How often do you buy a new bike?
    By JLampitt in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 65
    Last Post: 05-25-2013, 06:11 AM
  3. How often do you buy a new helmet?
    By Mai in forum Apparel and Protection
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 01-15-2011, 08:08 PM
  4. How often do you buy a new bike?
    By Evader 53 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 06-01-2006, 09:30 AM
  5. How often do you buy a new mtn bike?
    By Destroy in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 11-09-2005, 10:43 AM

Members who have read this thread: 280

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.