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  1. #1
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    How do you improve on the uphill?

    Hi all,

    How do you improve your endurance on the uphill? Is it just a matter of riding more? Will jogging help as a method of cross training (Hill runs)?

    Of course I do fine on the downhill, but I struggle on the uphill.

    To keep the long story short, what is the best way to build your uphill endurance?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Ride more, and do intervals if you feel like it. If you ride up enough hills, eventually you'll get better at 'em.

    If you're looking for specific climbing techniques, I recently wrote a blog post you might be interested in. It's called "7 Tactics for Tackling that Next Steep Hill." http://mountain.bike198.com/riding-t...xt-steep-hill/
    Feel free to check out my personal website, Greg Heil.com

  3. #3
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    single speed

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3034
    single speed
    So true!
    Feel free to check out my personal website, Greg Heil.com

  5. #5
    Never trust a fart
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3034
    single speed


    This is the fastest way to do it. You either ride your bike up the hill, or walk your bike up the hill.

  6. #6
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    I like to ride out of the saddle every few minutes and I down shift one cog when I do that.

  7. #7
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    Q: How do you improve on the uphill?
    A: Ride more uphill

    /threadclosed

  8. #8
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    Go ride up the longest hill you can find . Then , when you reach the top , coast back down it and repeat . A couple days a week sprint up short hills until you think your going to yak .

  9. #9
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    road bike. big gears and long rides with lots of climbs.

  10. #10
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    I'm lucky there is a pile of garbage in a park, called garbage hill, that has been capped, and covered with dirt a few miles from my house, its used for sledding/tobogganing in the winter, it has three rideable sides each with different grades, I go up, and down, using different gears, suspension settings, sitting, standing, just doing it untill I can't stand it, going easy on the brakes, so I have to start off slow doing zig zags, there isn't much room to stop at the bottom, I don't like replacing brakes every few trips there.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by manabiker
    I'm lucky there is a pile of garbage in a park, called garbage hill, that has been capped, and covered with dirt a few miles from my house, its used for sledding/tobogganing in the winter, it has three rideable sides each with different grades, I go up, and down, using different gears, suspension settings, sitting, standing, just doing it untill I can't stand it, going easy on the brakes, so I have to start off slow doing zig zags, there isn't much room to stop at the bottom, I don't like replacing brakes every few trips there.
    Belleville, Ontario?

  12. #12
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    Mountain biking, hill climbing in particular, tends to trend towards anaerobic conditioning. It will build muscle and power, which will clearly help with hills over time.

    However, aerobic conditioning will be essential to being able to feed those muscles with more oxygen to help in the climbs. The nature of mountain biking, pedaling uphills and then coasting downhills, isn't ideal for aerobic training. To truly improve your abilities you should be working in longer rides at lower intensity. Ideally you should be shooting to stay in your target heart range -- everyone has one for their age and weight. Getting a heart-rate monitor and either doing some rails/trails, road riding, spinning, treadmill, etc, trying to stay your target heart-rate, will go a long way towards improving your endurance.... both hills and overall.

    Good luck!

  13. #13
    DynoDon
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    Edward Hines Drive/Park, Dearborn Heights, Michigan Close..

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by GotoDengo
    Mountain biking, hill climbing in particular, tends to trend towards anaerobic conditioning. It will build muscle and power, which will clearly help with hills over time.

    However, aerobic conditioning will be essential to being able to feed those muscles with more oxygen to help in the climbs. The nature of mountain biking, pedaling uphills and then coasting downhills, isn't ideal for aerobic training. To truly improve your abilities you should be working in longer rides at lower intensity. Ideally you should be shooting to stay in your target heart range -- everyone has one for their age and weight. Getting a heart-rate monitor and either doing some rails/trails, road riding, spinning, treadmill, etc, trying to stay your target heart-rate, will go a long way towards improving your endurance.... both hills and overall.

    Good luck!

    I'll be sure to keep this in mind next time I'm on my SS on a 15 mile loop with 2,500 vertical feet of climbing. "Guys, can you slow down? My heart rate is too high!"

    I try to ride with faster riders both on mtn and road. Keeps me on my toes and helps me push past what I perceived as my limit.

    There are many schools of training and lot's of books on training....Performance Cycling (used to be talked about a lot on mtbr.com,) Time Crunched Cyclist (Carmichael's recent book), Friel (in my opinion -- old school training), etc.

    Find a method that works for you and stick with it....after all the books and suggestions, the best thing I did was buy a SS.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by manabiker
    Edward Hines Drive/Park, Dearborn Heights, Michigan Close..
    I wonder if that's a common thing? The one in Belleville was a dump right in town in the 1950's & 60's. They covered it with dirt in the 60's and turned it into a park in the 80's. It's a little spooky if you think about what was allowed in landfills in the 1950's.


    OP, sorry for the thread hijack. Most of the people I ride with (when I ride with people) are looking for the easy way up (when there's a choice). I go with what they want, but when I'm by myself, I always look for the hard way up. I quite often ride up the singletrack and down the road.

  16. #16
    gotta get up to get down
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    mt. brighton ski hill in southeast MI is made on top of a landfill as well, it's weird that they make old landfills into parks.
    ...hijacked!

    Cross-train to build endurance for those hills, go hike/run/swim/etc. whatever you can stand to do that isn't biking go do it on off days.

  17. #17
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    Lately I have been riding and keeping it on one gear for as long as I can. Middle ring always and started on the 3rd smallest cog in the rear and moved up to the 5th now.
    Last edited by Biohazard74; 10-18-2010 at 06:25 PM.
    Ride

  18. #18
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    Granny gear the hills for a month and you'll start to notice you don't need them after awhile. It's just that easy.
    Ragley Blue Pig

  19. #19
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    tangaroo: What electrolytes do chicken and turkey have again?
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biohazard74
    Lately I have been riding and keeping it on one gear for as long as I can. Middle ring always and started on the 3rd smallest cog in the rear and moved up to the 5th now.
    I've used a similar method where I'll tackle a particularly difficult hill in a gear that's too high. I go until I just can't go any further. Stop and rest for a couple of minutes then continue on in the same gear. I keep doing that all the way to the top. Over time the rest stops get fewer and farther between until I'm riding all the way up non-stop.

  21. #21
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    I noticed a significant difference when I went from a hard tail to a FS. The bumps don't slow you down as bad. I use a 34T rear cassette, gear down and take my time. I very rarely stand. Maybe I'm just lazy, but I get to the top eventually.

  22. #22
    Rod
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    Ride more hills. A road bike to help you build an engine and ride hilly routes.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

  23. #23
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    Find a hill or loop and time yourself once a week, ideally doing 2 or 3 laps. Work on riding fast (or cleanly) through specific sections you find challenging, as in ride it, turn around, ride it again, etc. (I think the kids call it "sessioning" )

    And don't over-train, mix in some rides where you take it easy.

  24. #24
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    I used to struggle with the long climbs and started to dread them. I got into downhill mountain biking about a year ago. Bought a big heavy dh bike and then my favorite resorts started to limit lift and shuttle service. So I was left to pedal my dh bike a lot more than I thought. After a summer of that now my puke hill cross country climbs are so much easier. My point is, if you find it difficult but possible, push it just a little more. Try longer but less steep climbs using your middle chainring instead of your easiest. It takes dedication. It always sucks when you are trying to first break through to new level. But your body doesn't build endurance if it's not required to. The biggest tip is to keep challenging your body. Not over doing it but keep your body guessing.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3034
    single speed
    Or if your not a complete Sadist, 1x9.

    Did wonders for my climbing. I started off using a 32t ring with 11/34 cassette and a few months later I was using a 38T. Jumping back on a bike with normal gears up front now seems like cheating, I never went back. 1x9 is my ticket.
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  26. #26
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    The other thing that helps is convincing (or tricking) yourself that you like climbing... and not because you're good at it necessarily, but just because you like that kind of suffering... think of every climb as if you're a mountain climber summiting some challenging peak.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by norbyd
    How do you improve on the uphill?
    Get a road bike with ridiculous gearing (39x21) and hit the hills as many times per week as necessary. Lather, rinse, repeat, for about one year. That’s what I did, and now none of my mountain biking riding buddies can touch me going up hills… and the bike I ride weighs 47.8 pounds!!!!! My legs have become quite large, and now I can destroy a bottom bracket in 2000 miles of uphill insanity.

    Oh yeah, I forgot to mention two very VALUABLE training aids:

    #1: anaerobic training—drink alcohol the night before you ride; the lack of oxygen retention in your body on the ride the next morning will help you.

    #2: anhydrous training—limit yourself to one bottle of water per your ride; meter yourself out for as long as possible on that one bottle of water (I managed to go a bit under 40 miles on one bottle, mixed hilly/flat terrain).
    Uh oh! Someone just stole your KOM!

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by GotoDengo
    To truly improve your abilities you should be working in longer rides at lower intensity. Ideally you should be shooting to stay in your target heart range -- everyone has one for their age and weight.
    I am no expert, but I am pretty sure that modern research has shown many more metabolic pathways than just aerobic and anaerobic. While training in your target heart range is fine for SOME sessions, it is best to mix it up with a variety of different combinations of length of interval, length of rest, and number of intervals. A low-intensity ride is always a nice change of pace, but if you are training for hills, you should push the intensity because hills are the intense part of the ride. Maybe I am biased because our hills here on the east coast are short and steep and there are lots of them.... if you are on a really long death-march climb then lower-intensity/target heart rate might be a better strategy.

    Seriously, though, treating your riding like training makes it less fun for a lot of people so just go ride. Ride a lot and ride fast. Imagine there is perpetually someone 50 feet ahead of you and you are trying to catch them.

    If you fail on a hill, make a note of how far you made it, then set a goal to get a little further next time. There are many times my body feels ready to quit, but I make up my mind that I made the climb before, so I can make it this time.

    The climb will never get easier. It will always suck. You will just gradually get you body conditioned to deal with more and more suck.

    Other obvious but worth mentioning advice... get your seat high enough so you can pedal efficiently, be in the right gear, make sure your brakes aren't dragging, have someone more experienced critique your pedaling cadence.
    You better just go ahead and drop that seatpost down to the reflector... the trail gets pretty rough down there.

  29. #29
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    great thread

  30. #30
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    -Intervals on a stationary bike made an almost overnight difference for me. I need to stop being lazy and keep doing them...
    -Ride with someone faster, and just follow their rear tire.
    Not kidding at all, and it's a big confidence booster when you suddenly find yourself at the top of a climb you didn't think you'd make, and it's a surprise because you'd been focusing on a tire a few yards in front of you the whole time instead of some distant point with a lot of elevation change in between.
    I just switched to 1x10 from SS, mainly for longer climbs in the heat that have been wiping me out. Spinning an easier gear is actually a lot harder than I thought, not being accustomed to it, but I had the opportunity to ride with a much stronger rider who's been racing for 20yrs this week. I'm sure he was holding back for my benefit(while I thought I was dying!), but I made a 2 mile climb that I'd never made in the past without walking part of, whether with 1 gear or 20. Though we split up, afterwards, I later made another climb that I've only made once before, and it was easy in comparison. A lot of what you can and can't do is in your head, but once you know you can do something...you can do it again.

  31. #31
    Anytime. Anywhere.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6foot4 View Post
    great thread
    And 7 years old. Hills have changed and this info is seriously out of date.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bickle View Post
    And 7 years old. Hills have changed and this info is seriously out of date.
    In what ways?

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    I sense sarcasm

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6foot4 View Post
    In what ways?
    What are you a GD teenager? Back in my day the hills were much bigger, uphill both ways and it was always hotter or colder than it is now. I was just getting going, but have forgotten what I was going to say.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  35. #35
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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bickle View Post
    What are you a GD teenager? Back in my day the hills were much bigger, uphill both ways and it was always hotter or colder than it is now. I was just getting going, but have forgotten what I was going to say.
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  37. #37
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    I'm new to 1X11 and needing to step it up some after 25 years of 3x7 or 3x8.

    Been trying to get in the habit of remembering the next ring as a go-to from my comfort cadence. That and I just need to get out regularly and cover my neighborhood that's plenty hilly for a good workout. I haven't even focused on hills so there is nowhere to go but improvement in my case.

    I ride with guys that are stronger/younger than I am so I know that keeps me cookin'. I can feel it. Just haven't been at it much in the past 6 weeks or so. We've all got busy with family and summer.

    Last edited by bachman1961; 07-30-2017 at 10:49 AM.
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  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by norbyd View Post
    To keep the long story short, what is the best way to build your uphill endurance?
    Ride your road bike.

  39. #39
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    What about riding the bike up the down escalator ?
    Seems like a killer workout.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails How do you improve on the uphill?-escalator.jpg  

    In the Middle Ages, the biggest mistake was not putting on your armor because you were 'just going down to the corner.'

  40. #40
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    Seek out climbs. Learn to enjoy the challenge.

    Hill repeats - climb a longish hill in the biggest gear you can comfortably push in the saddle then coast back down. Repeat a dozen times as a short, intense training session.

    You don't need a road bike.

    Ride bitumen hills on your MTB if the dirt is too far away to do it regularly.

    Training is meant to be hard....not easy.
    Last edited by Sideknob; 07-30-2017 at 05:14 AM.
    Less isn't MOAR

  41. #41
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    What has worked for me:
    - Spent the winter on an indoor trainer doing interval & power/endurance training

    - Lost 20 lbs (that right there REALLY helped

    - Find hill, climb. Climb it different ways. I've started doing 30-45 second intervals some days, others I'll pick a cadence and stick with it. Other times I'll pick a heart rate zone and go as fast/slow as what'll keep me in that zone

  42. #42
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    I'm no expert on this but for me it comes down to two things - cardio and leg strength. Either can be the weak link.

    For cardio, there is nothing like mileage, be it on a road bike, a mountain bike, a singlespeed, a fixie or even a stationary/spin class. If you can't find any good hills to session, intervals work the best for me. I can get far more benefit from 20 minutes of killer intervals, than from an hour of constant intensity junk miles. But yeah - sessioning hill climbing is best.

    For leg strength, nothing works better for me than weights. Squats, to be precise. I have been doing the 5x5 StrongLifts program for a few months now and holy crap - I have never in my life climbed more effortlessly than I am right now. And this is coming from a guy who has commuted daily on a fixie for some time now, with a very shitty 15 minute sustained climb on the way home every day (not that I consider myself a great, or even good, climber - I am only suggesting things that have most effectively made me a better climber). Mileage will also obviously improve leg strength as well but for me, squats (deep squats, as advocated in the 5x5 program) have been unbelievable in ratcheting me up a number of levels, very quickly.

    Mileage for cardio, squats for leg strength. That's what has worked for me.
    Last edited by mtnbkrmike; 07-30-2017 at 05:50 PM.

  43. #43
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    Yeah squats help a lot. Another program you can try is the 20 rep squat. You do like 80% of your max, 20 reps. Really builds muscle endurance.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbGreg View Post
    If you're looking for specific climbing techniques, I recently wrote a blog post you might be interested in. It's called "7 Tactics for Tackling that Next Steep Hill." http://mountain.bike198.com/riding-t...xt-steep-hill/
    C'mon man. Don't do this to people.
    We don't ride to add days to our life, we ride to add life to the days we have left here.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biohazard74 View Post
    Lately I have been riding and keeping it on one gear for as long as I can. Middle ring always and started on the 3rd smallest cog in the rear and moved up to the 5th now.
    if that's the case you are getting weaker !

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaiser373 View Post
    if that's the case you are getting weaker !
    The post you replied to is 8 years old...from back when bikes may have had middle rings.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    The post you replied to is 8 years old...from back when bikes may have had middle rings.
    ..thanks for replying I was just commenting about the fact that the 5th smallest gear is larger than the 3rd smallest hence a lower gear and easier to pedal.just being pedantic.best wishes from the UK.

  48. #48
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    ebike

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaiser373 View Post
    ..thanks for replying I was just commenting about the fact that the 5th smallest gear is larger than the 3rd smallest hence a lower gear and easier to pedal.just being pedantic.best wishes from the UK.
    Sorry, just found it funny that you waited 12 years after joining to make your first post and then did it on an 8 year old post. Yes, I agree with your analysis of the post.

  50. #50
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    #1 way to improve uphill performance is to drop weight. To drop weight one almost always does something to improve their fitness. Improving power is great, but it does not necessarily translate to going up hill fast. Look at the road bike peloton. It's not the guys that put out crazy power (sprinters or TT specialists) that are the best climbers. It's the light weight guys that put out reasonable power. That translates to MTBing too.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    Sorry, just found it funny that you waited 12 years after joining to make your first post and then did it on an 8 year old post. Yes, I agree with your analysis of the post.
    I just suddenly got the urge...Better late than never! I

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaiser373 View Post
    I just suddenly got the urge...Better late than never! I
    I've always admired the care-free easy going lifestyle. Acting on an impulse.... awesome.
    oops I wasn't clipped in

  53. #53
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    The second response was the correct one.

    ...8 years ago.
    Why Johnny Ringo, you look like someone just walked over your grave.

  54. #54
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    Lots of good advice & strategy (& a bit of sarcasm) in this thread. Here's my 2.

    To get better at climbing, you need strength & endurance. Just don't try to get them both in the same workout - you'll burnout &/or injure yourself. If you do a steep hill-climb pedal-mash one day, do a long-easy cardio ride the next day. If you experience muscle- fatigue or soreness, give yourself an extra recovery day. Stay hydrated, eat right, lay off alcohol, & get lots of sleep. If you experience muscle-cramps, include electrolytes in your hydration. Stretch while your tissues are warm.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with all your might.... (Ecclesiastes 9:10)

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