How do roadies do it????- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    How do roadies do it????

    Just went out for an urban ride today to make use of the awesome weather in the Northeast today although I was dying to get out on the trails and I pondered to myself how the roadies can stay on paved roads all day.... I mean even on urban rides I need stuff to drop, jump, or something to shake things up..... The ironic thing is that I signed up for a charity ride this summer riding from Providence, RI to Seattle, WA thinking it'll be a great way to see the country...... I wonder what I got myself into........

  2. #2
    nachos rule!
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    different games to play

    try winding up a 35 mph town line sprint, or railing a downhill corner at 50+ mph, or an out of the saddle uphill drag race on the steepest pitch of the climb, or riding tempo for 15 minutes straight keeping yourself right at the edge of puking the whole time. plenty of fun...

    -eric
    plus a change, plus c'est la m'me chose - alphonse karr

  3. #3

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    If you're an adrenaline junkie, road riding may not be your cuppa' joe. With mountain bikes, the trail provides all the entertainment I need. On my road rides, many times I have to entertain myself. There is plenty of sweetness in either ride, it's just a different flavor of sweetness.

    To feel the love, get an older steel road bike, and ride it. Not only will it give you a new appreciation for the beauty of bicycles, but it'll make you a better mountain biker, too. If you find the right bike, you can even throw a set of 'cross tires on it and hit the trails. Riding a road bike offroad will improve your MTB'ing skills like nothing else, and it's a total blast!

    If, for some crazy reason, I could only have one bike, it'd be a cross bike, so I could do both. Actually, it'd be my Rivendell, with classic road geometry, cantis, and clearance for a 700X40 tire. It should be here in December, I'm already counting days....

    --Shannon

  4. #4
    Te mortuo heres tibi sim?
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    yep. just like the other two said. different, but can be fun too. try it and see. the fitness gains are well worth it.

    sure, i prefer trail days, but i love road days too. even moreso now that i've been riding fixed gear road. a blast! your mind can just sort of do whatever, as your legs just keep on churning.......
    Florence Nightingale's Stormtrooper

  5. #5
    Boj
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    Roadies do it with a sprint finish


    Thereby (dis)gracefully bringing my first century

  6. #6
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    supercorsa said it all.
    hey
    ho
    lets go!

  7. #7
    jcw
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    Sounds great tube-ee...

    Quote Originally Posted by tube_ee
    If you're an adrenaline junkie, road riding may not be your cuppa' joe. With mountain bikes, the trail provides all the entertainment I need. On my road rides, many times I have to entertain myself. There is plenty of sweetness in either ride, it's just a different flavor of sweetness.

    To feel the love, get an older steel road bike, and ride it. Not only will it give you a new appreciation for the beauty of bicycles, but it'll make you a better mountain biker, too. If you find the right bike, you can even throw a set of 'cross tires on it and hit the trails. Riding a road bike offroad will improve your MTB'ing skills like nothing else, and it's a total blast!

    If, for some crazy reason, I could only have one bike, it'd be a cross bike, so I could do both. Actually, it'd be my Rivendell, with classic road geometry, cantis, and clearance for a 700X40 tire. It should be here in December, I'm already counting days....

    --Shannon
    I second everything you said. That Rivendell sounds swweeeet! My ideal single bike would probably be a Moots Psychlo-X w/custom geometry. But even my lowly Trek XO-1 sees more use than any other bike I own.
    Anyway, back to the original posters question, it's definitely more of a mindset than anything. On the road I get into a kind of zone where my mind is clear and I'm really able to focus. Kinda similar to distance running or backpacking IMO. If you like that kinda thing, road riding can be very theraputic. But in this day and age of neeeding to be constantly entertained from an external source, road riding is probably very boring. I think its also more enjoyable for those that like to suffer.

  8. #8
    Ride what you want!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by cheetos316
    Just went out for an urban ride today to make use of the awesome weather in the Northeast today although I was dying to get out on the trails and I pondered to myself how the roadies can stay on paved roads all day...
    I don't know how the urban roadies do it, but there are some awsome canyon roads and sierra mountain roads that put you out in the middle of no where with just the wind, sun and pavement underneath.

    Road riding is about speed, and quiet, and a total efficiency on the bike. When you are in the drops on some fast downhll run, it's like you're flying. Whoooooooosh! You want a rush, take a hard turn going 40+ mph on a skinny tire. Or better yet, try being a crit with a pack of 50 guys going into the 90 degree turn going 30mph. Leaning into the turn and find yourslef rubbing shoulders with the guy next to you. Knowing that if that guy in front of you taps his breaks, it's over and there is nothing you could do to save yourself.

    george
    Trogs: Too Tough for Carbon Fiber

  9. #9
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    Did you go by yourself? Doing a road ride by yourself can be boring, if you make it. I personally loved (I use past tense, since it's been quite a while since I mounted my road bike) going on solo rides because it game me some time to reflect and such, and not have to worry about what rock lurks around a corner.

    If you're going from mt to road, sure the intensity will be far less. Try doing a group ride. Notice how ever hill, no matter how small, there is a race to the top. Notice how egos are more important than what bike you have. Make it interesting by making it challenging.

  10. #10
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    as a recovered roadie.....

    I now wonder how I did it! Years ago, I tentatively sold my Bottechia to explore the world of dirt and consequently fell in love with it! Went from straight xc racing to trail riding to dirt jumps and bmx to riding park and now, trying some light freeride. I just keep getting deeper and deeper it seems. Anyhow, im diverging. Last year I decided I needed another road bike since our spring time here is anything but flowers and sun. The trails are nearly unrideale (without totally destroying them) for at least the next couple of months save a few lucky days here and there. Sure, a road bike seemed like the answer. I did some research and settled on buying a sweet Gunnar. 853 steel, all Ultegra...figured I'd love it! Well, the bike is sweet but I have had a really tough time getting back into it. I ride it on the trainer but have only been on the road about 4-5 times with it. Seems like every time Im gonna, I have some excuse to ride urban or lift or something else. I feel like I need the roadie since I ride SS offroad so I can't exactly get a good road workout on the mtb.

    Point of all this is that I don't really know how I did it. Sometimes I'd play games in my head, mocking up race situations and playin them out (yes, I know how geeky that sounds). I also agree with some of the posts above about the therapy of road riding (especially if done at night and alone). Still, I have recently been thinking about selling my nearly unused road beauty to get a burly bsx/freeride hardtail. Mistake? Maybe, but I just can't seem to get back in that road frame of mind. Maybe once the tour starts rolling again, we'll feel more inspired. In the meantime, good luck if you are thinking about it and let me know if you ride a 54cm....you might be able to talk me into something .

    Peace and have fun. as long as its on two wheels, you're doing ok!
    though hope is frail, it must prevail - Taj Weekes

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    eh-nay Ityopia!

  11. #11
    Jm.
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    Quote Originally Posted by cheetos316
    Just went out for an urban ride today to make use of the awesome weather in the Northeast today although I was dying to get out on the trails and I pondered to myself how the roadies can stay on paved roads all day.... I mean even on urban rides I need stuff to drop, jump, or something to shake things up..... The ironic thing is that I signed up for a charity ride this summer riding from Providence, RI to Seattle, WA thinking it'll be a great way to see the country...... I wonder what I got myself into........
    When I was in Jr High I did a 50 mile road-bikeathon to raise money for my ski-team.










    What i didn't tell them was that I was going to have myself dropped off in the sierra-nevadas at about 7,000 feet and descend to about 2,000 feet in that 50 miles

  12. #12
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by cheetos316
    Just went out for an urban ride today to make use of the awesome weather in the Northeast today although I was dying to get out on the trails and I pondered to myself how the roadies can stay on paved roads all day.... I mean even on urban rides I need stuff to drop, jump, or something to shake things up..... The ironic thing is that I signed up for a charity ride this summer riding from Providence, RI to Seattle, WA thinking it'll be a great way to see the country...... I wonder what I got myself into........
    That charity ride sounds great. Definitely buy a road bike for it rather than using a mountain bike with slicks. Half the joy of the road ride is in the efficiency of the machine.

  13. #13
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    Road riding is all about finding your inner zi and chen. or maybe its zen and chi, or something like that. just peace out and ride.
    speaking of road, anyone from seattle ride the chilly hilly on sunday? represent!

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    Bad comparison...

    Quote Originally Posted by cheetos316
    Just went out for an urban ride today to make use of the awesome weather in the Northeast today although I was dying to get out on the trails and I pondered to myself how the roadies can stay on paved roads all day.... I mean even on urban rides I need stuff to drop, jump, or something to shake things up..... The ironic thing is that I signed up for a charity ride this summer riding from Providence, RI to Seattle, WA thinking it'll be a great way to see the country...... I wonder what I got myself into........
    You are comparing road biking to mountain biking. I do both with my hardtail MTB. It's about an even split for me. I crank out 10-30K a day, in season. I bought some Kenda OEM tires, used on Diamondback bikes. These ride smoothly on the road, without knobby tire vibration, when inflated to the max 70lbs pressure.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=8044

    I would not compare road biking to mountain biking. Trails are more fun. Instead, how about comparing road biking to a stationary bike. Now, suddenly road biking is so much more interesting.

    Keeping active keeps you fit. Riding on the road is way better than riding a stationary bike.

    I usually ride road in a rural area. This means little traffic, which allows me to ride side-by-side with a biking partner, until a car comes along. This can be very social. It is hard to ride side-by-side on single track.

    On the road, it is also easier to enjoy the scenery when you are not coping with what the trail throws at you. The scenery can be very enjoyable, if you ride in the right areas.

    Riding the paved bike trails, in Ottawa, is terrific because the trails run through parkland along the sides of the Ottawa and Rideau rivers, and the Rideau Canal.

    If I take my bike into Ottawa, I usually ride from Hog's Back Falls, near Mooney's Bay Beach, to the Rideau Falls lookout, where the Rideau River joins the Ottawa River. I then ride through the Byward Market (= Yorkville = Gastown...the "hip" spot in the city), where I stop for refreshment at an outdoor cafe, that allows me to keep an eye on my bike and to people watch. I then head back up the Rideau Canal past Ottawa U, around Dow's Lake, across the locks at Carleton U, and back to Mooney's Bay. The natural scenery is beautiful, and the female scenery is not so bad either. (shame on you old_dude)

    The ride from Britannia Bay to the Byward Market along the Ottawa River is neat too. If you are lucky, you may catch some dudes white water kayaking on this hidden kayak race course a stones throw from Parliament Hill, right in the city. You can come back along the Rideau Canal, and then turn up Preston Street at Dow's Lake, through little Italy, to get back to the bike path on the Ottawa River, at Parkdale.

    Check it out here:

    http://apps101.ottawa.ca/travelwise/...w=6&basecol=17

    Click the arrow at 1:30 twice, and then the arrow at 12:00 once to see the whole of the first route. Then click the 9:00 arrow a bunch of times to trace out the second route.

    When road riding locally, it also helps to pick a nice destination, where the route includes some dirt road, and possibly some off-road, at the end of the ride. We bike locally on the back roads, to the back side of Constance Lake, Phiney's Point, The Bill Mason conservation area, the "Y" camp, etc. It's all good.

    old_dude

  15. #15
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    I've always been pretty anti-road-bike, but I got a used one last summer to commute on. Well, last weekend I went on a real live road ride, and it was sorta fun. However, there are three very important things to consider when doing a road ride. In order of importance, they are...

    1) Location: The road we went on was a one-lane in many places, with lots of curves and rolling hills, meandering through beautiful hills and vineyards, and only had about one car every 20 minutes pass us. That made a HUGE difference. Less Traffic+more scenery=good time.
    2) Company: It was an old college buddy and our wives. We had a good time, although it would have been nice if it were just us guys so we could go faster.
    3) Having a real road bike: It is just awesome how much faster you can go on a road bike. You really feel like you are getting a lot done compared to MTBing, so the efficiency is sortof fun.

  16. #16

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    The challenges are different in road biking, but they're definately there,...

    Quote Originally Posted by cheetos316
    Just went out for an urban ride today to make use of the awesome weather in the Northeast today although I was dying to get out on the trails and I pondered to myself how the roadies can stay on paved roads all day.... I mean even on urban rides I need stuff to drop, jump, or something to shake things up..... The ironic thing is that I signed up for a charity ride this summer riding from Providence, RI to Seattle, WA thinking it'll be a great way to see the country...... I wonder what I got myself into........
    ...once you become more aquainted with it. The art of timing and strategy is much more critical in road biking than in mt biking. There's much less time to to respond to attacks and decide where you want to position yourself, sometimes it only takes a second of hesitation to keep you from bridging a gap in time to keep from dying in the wind.

    Sure it's not as rugged in the sense of jumps and what not, but the speed on descents along with the potential for injury is there just the same. The arts of sprinting, pacing, chicanes, and even knowing how often to stand versus sit on a long climb can make or break you. Sometimes it takes a few humiliating defeats at these "simple" skills to make you want to pursue the sport more, and see the beauty of it.

    If you think road bike race is easy, just watch how close and fast good road/crit racers ride side by side in high speed turns, every now and then the crashes that result can be sobering.

    Other than that, there are solid reasons to respect road riding, even if it's just a supplement to mt biking. It can be a good alternative to trails snowed in or mud drenched. As well, it can be a once or twice a week relief to being pounded off road. The reason I like it best though, is the physchological and aerobic/form benefits it has in both breaking up your routine, and helping you maintain good cardio conditioning, as well as spinning form, esp in early season training for marathon mt bike rides.
    Last edited by Gnarlygig; 03-02-2004 at 08:45 PM.

  17. #17
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    How do they do it?

    The question is "How long can they stand it?". I was a roadie until getting caught by the MTB bug. No way could I do roads again. Is it boredom? Repeating the same old roads? The same aerodynamic ride position? The same spin over and over?
    MTB'ing has variety and connection with nature. The trails can change with every storm. I looked at the roadie discussion boards and saw ride pictures - basically asphalt with a bit of green on the side, maybe an interesting stop sign, etc.

  18. #18
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    age matters....

    to me anyways. i urban/freeride, 2 hrs a day with 6+ at the ski hills or local trails on the weekends, without fail. this has been my biking life...but as i find i can handle less of the beating every year, i am becoming more interested in road biking. as well, i ride sooo much, but my wife will kick my as* on any road ride longer than 5km. why am i so out of shape, or is she just in so much better shape because of all the road riding.

    plus, i see guys railing steep mountain corners so fast, that would rule. i will never give up mtb, it is the essence of why i bike, i will DH as long as possible, but it is time to explore the biking world.
    what would rainbow unicorn do?

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    Quote Originally Posted by pacman
    The question is "How long can they stand it?". I was a roadie until getting caught by the MTB bug. No way could I do roads again. Is it boredom? Repeating the same old roads? The same aerodynamic ride position? The same spin over and over?
    MTB'ing has variety and connection with nature. The trails can change with every storm. I looked at the roadie discussion boards and saw ride pictures - basically asphalt with a bit of green on the side, maybe an interesting stop sign, etc.
    Road riding is boring... If you are. Yeah, riding the same roads all the time, recording your time, max HR, avg speed, etc, etc, ad nauseum would be really dull. The only people I know who ride that way are Cat. 1 / 2 or pro racers. Their reasons for riding, and the way they ride, are valid, for them.

    Me... I just like to ride bikes, and road riding is a different and equally neat-o way to do that.

    road riding != road racing, which is something that all too many forget.

    --Shannon, a bike geek from
    San Diego, CA

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    Years ago I busted my Philwood hub. In college and broke I didn't have the cash to fix it. Hanging in my folk's garage was an old Schwinn Le Tour. Downtube shifters, foamy bar, the works. I swapped out the bar, put on proper bar tape, and used my SPD clipless from my MTB. I spent a good two months only riding on the road, something I had never done before. Soon I had the cash, Philwood fixed my hub, and my LBS rebuilt the wheel. Then I went for a MTB ride. I couldn't believe how my speed and endurance had increased. I would pedal uphill in a larger ring. I could ride father and longer than before.

    Now 12 years later my GT ZRX cyclocross bike is my ride of choice for the road. Perfect for road rides with the local club and solo trips around the island (I live in Taiwan). Though the mountain biking here is great, I still get in a few good rides on pavement a week.

  21. #21
    M070R-M0U7H FR3NCHI3
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    Quote Originally Posted by frank4
    Now 12 years later my GT ZRX cyclocross bike is my ride of choice for the road. Perfect for road rides with the local club and solo trips around the island (I live in Taiwan). Though the mountain biking here is great, I still get in a few good rides on pavement a week.
    haha...I got the same bike! Although it had quite a few layers of dust on it right now...not riding it much!

  22. #22

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    Is she on a road bike?

    Quote Originally Posted by ferday
    to me anyways. i urban/freeride, 2 hrs a day with 6+ at the ski hills or local trails on the weekends, without fail. this has been my biking life...but as i find i can handle less of the beating every year, i am becoming more interested in road biking. as well, i ride sooo much, but my wife will kick my as* on any road ride longer than 5km. why am i so out of shape, or is she just in so much better shape because of all the road riding.

    plus, i see guys railing steep mountain corners so fast, that would rule. i will never give up mtb, it is the essence of why i bike, i will DH as long as possible, but it is time to explore the biking world.
    I am making some guesses here, since it sounds like you should be in good enough shape to keep up with your wife.

    If you wife is on a road bike, and you are on a mountain bike, then she has a very distinct advantage. Road bikes are much faster on the road, and much easier to pedal on the road over long distances.

    Try trading bikes with her for one ride and then see if she still kicks your butt.

    If you are in the city, you may not have a quick release seatpost clamp. If you are doing a lot of stunts, and some off-road, you probably have your seat lower than is best for efficient riding on the road. Road riding wants more seat height for better efficiency when you pedal. A too low seat will tire you more quickly and slow you down.

    BTW, I ride all the time too. My wife and I have exactly the same bikes and tires, inflated to the same pressure. She is very competitive and sees a bike ride as exercise and training, while I just see it as fun. She has a habit of setting a fast pace, since she feels she will get more benefit from the ride. She does the same walking or kayaking. I keep telling her to slow down and relax, but inevitably end up going at her pace.

    old_dude

  23. #23
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    Get stupid!

    Quote Originally Posted by cheetos316
    Just went out for an urban ride today to make use of the awesome weather in the Northeast today although I was dying to get out on the trails and I pondered to myself how the roadies can stay on paved roads all day.... I mean even on urban rides I need stuff to drop, jump, or something to shake things up..... The ironic thing is that I signed up for a charity ride this summer riding from Providence, RI to Seattle, WA thinking it'll be a great way to see the country...... I wonder what I got myself into........
    I came to mountain biking after a long stint as a triathlete. Have to agree with you, that mountain biking is way more fun. However, the "fun" trails I like the best are way too slow to get me to the totally whacked frame of mind I get from a really hard road ride. It's easy to overdo it and bonk, but I get an amazing high from a good road ride. Plus it's good for you and legal too! Just hunker down and crank for an hour or 2. Wheee!

    Doesn't take much to entertain me at an effective IQ of 45.

    Walt

  24. #24
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    BTW, I ride all the time too. My wife and I have exactly the same bikes and tires, inflated to the same pressure. She is very competitive and sees a bike ride as exercise and training, while I just see it as fun. She has a habit of setting a fast pace, since she feels she will get more benefit from the ride. She does the same walking or kayaking. I keep telling her to slow down and relax, but inevitably end up going at her pace.
    Damn! Lucky. I wish my wife would push like that.

  25. #25
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    Mountain biker here:

    I finally got serious enough about mountainbiking to get a roadbike this month. It's pretty simple, really, as I want to be a stronger mtbiker. Need more sustained big ring aerobic/LT training under my belt to go faster, and I can't get that on my bike. Here in Santa Fe, we are lucky enough to have both epic mtbiking trails close to town, and a good variety of rolling & flat (and a wicked climb to the ski basin, among others...) rural-esque roads. I finally mustered the courage to go on a group ride with some hammer roadies recently and got SPANKED. We had ridden a quick 25 miles "out" to a little town called Galisteo, then turned around to begin the ride / climb home. After about 6 miles, there is a 2 mile or so steady climb that the group sprinted up. It quickly broke into threee groups: the wicked-super bad-ass cat 1-2 riders (disappeared!); and the strong as hell cat 2-3 guys (still left me in the dust); and then me and two other folks. One was sick as a dog, the other either bonked or was hungover, and me. I caught the maniacs about 4 miles later as they were spinning along, recovering from the rocket run, and we all finished up the close to 50 mile ride in less than 2 1/2 hours! Try covering that kind of mileage on singletrack, and getting the sustained, hard grinding workout that a ride like this affords! Not to mention the roads do pass through beautiful rolling high desert country with vistas to the horizon all around.... and the roads are safe and wide.

    Some background though: What's funny is that I had been off a skinny-tired bike for so long, I had forgotten the beauty in the efficiency of a road bike. Every ounce of energy expended goes to forward progress. I had messengered in NYC for 5 or so years on a fixed gear track bike and got so bummed/burned out on riding that I walked away from cycling for a long time. The old track bike and my trusty Stumpy sat in the garage collecting dust, or disassembled into boxes in storage while I sat on a barstool after work,smoking and drinking until I had ballooned to 265 pounds! NYC will do that to you pretty quickly if given the chance. In 2000 some of my wifes co-workers found out I was something of a cyclist (albeit washed up) so they invited me to go out to Mountain Creek in Northern NJ to ride the lift's up and cruise the trails down. So I dug out the MTBike, dusted her off and hoped for the best. These guys had new state-of-the-art FS bikes, disk brakes & clipless pedals and so on, while I was rigid, v and canti braked, platform pedaled old school! Funny thing was that I smoked them, even though I was wearing Doc Martens (forgot sneakers...). My old bmx/freestyle days and years of messengering had put enough memeory into my muscles to still handle a bike, despite the massive amounts of flab and the 2 pack a day marlboro habit and complete lack of conditioning. Of course, the minute the trail was flat or went UP, I was in pain.

    Needless to say, I was hooked. Soon thereafter my wife and I went bike shopping (both of us) then moved out west here and I began the (ongoing) process of "cleaning up" so to speak. Quit smoking, started riding more and more, started hiking some, and picked up snowboarding again, and rode and rode and rode. At the beginning of last year I was feeling pretty good, down at a weight of around 225 pounds and had passable endurance in addition to re-emegring bike handling skills, so I decided to try and race (!). After a few times I was hooked, but realized I still had a long way to go to be in shape even for Sport class. Sooooo, enter the rollers/track bike, then the new road bike this winter. Since Jan. 1, 2004, I've logged almost 1200 miles of rollers, road and mtbiking, which includes 4 laps at 24hrs. in Tucson a few weeks ago. I hope to be in a little better shape for this season ;-) and am down to 186 pounds, a 10 year low! 15-20 more pounds to go....

    The long and the short of it regarding road biking is that now I can't wait to get out and do 100+ mile rides, as it seems well within reach and will benefit my real passion, mountain biking! Plus, road miles cost a lot less equipment-wise than mountain miles!
    Last edited by glenzx; 03-04-2004 at 09:33 AM.
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  26. #26
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    Fun and freedom

    Quote Originally Posted by tube_ee
    Road riding is boring... If you are. Yeah, riding the same roads all the time, recording your time, max HR, avg speed, etc, etc, ad nauseum would be really dull. The only people I know who ride that way are Cat. 1 / 2 or pro racers. Their reasons for riding, and the way they ride, are valid, for them.

    Me... I just like to ride bikes, and road riding is a different and equally neat-o way to do that.

    road riding != road racing, which is something that all too many forget.

    --Shannon, a bike geek from
    San Diego, CA
    Yes, it's neat.
    I can ride any trail any time I want. I can't say that about roads.

    Not as many dull people on MTB's, with MTB riders of different skills can ride together, on the road it's wheel-suck or get dropped.

    On MTB's your mistakes can kill you, on the road someone else's mistake can kill you.

  27. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by pacman
    Not as many dull people on MTB's, with MTB riders of different skills can ride together, on the road it's wheel-suck or get dropped.
    If you avoid the Lance-a-bees, you won't have this problem.

    --Shannon, whose rod riding buddies alwasy wait for him at the top of the hill, in
    San Diego, CA

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by pacman
    On MTB's your mistakes can kill you...
    Okay, now let's not get too dramatic.

  29. #29
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    Road bikes kick the ass

    I had a flat on my road bike a coupla' weeks ago, and I decided to ride my MTB to work. Well, the fast and efficient feel of a road bike can not be diplicated on a mountain bike. I've tried the skinny 26" slicks, and I still went back to my road bike in short order. I don't think it was any faster, just felt better. There will never again be a day that I do not own a road bike, but I go months where my mountain bike is just a titanium coat rack in my front closet.

  30. #30
    bonkin' clyde
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    heres the difference

    Quote Originally Posted by cheetos316
    Just went out for an urban ride today to make use of the awesome weather in the Northeast today although I was dying to get out on the trails and I pondered to myself how the roadies can stay on paved roads all day.... I mean even on urban rides I need stuff to drop, jump, or something to shake things up..... The ironic thing is that I signed up for a charity ride this summer riding from Providence, RI to Seattle, WA thinking it'll be a great way to see the country...... I wonder what I got myself into........
    All arguments/rebuttals welcome, but try to understand what I'm saying.

    I remember when I used to do some road biking on my POS huffy-made steel frame, once I hit about 6-10 mph, it took off like a rocket. Needless to say, I had BIG chainrings. Anyway, I was a human-powered speed demon back then and still am, and despite its problems, I still miss the bike because I could always speed down a street in the highest gear and get a kick out of the wind rushing by me like crazy, not to mention the sweet sensation when I hit a reasonable speed then really took off hitting 35+ mph if I really tried.

    As some have said, road vs. mtb is pointless. Its like comparing Nascar vs. Formula 1. Speed demons love road-riding and just enjoy being able to bike right out of their driveway instead of having to go to the trailhead, while mtb guys like me (at least now) love the bone-jarring, adrenaline pumping fun of making a line down a tough, steep hill.

    BTW, when you road-ride, you can still enjoy the outdoors but you need a little more self-motivation because it can get fairly monotonous, especially when you are riding X-USA, while mtbing is always requiring your attention or something eye-catching comes up every second. Besides, the one thing I hate about riding along roads is going uphill with cars zipping by. It is such a depressing feeling thinking of how comfortable it must be to just drive along instead of cranking away, your fatigue stopping you from going any further. But if you ride with a group as you will on your cross-country ride, it'll be relatively easy to keep yourself motivated by trying to stay a step ahead of one or two pf the people for a mile or two...

    Enjoy man, I'll be honest, I wish I was in your shoes....
    Last edited by bluronthetrails; 06-07-2004 at 08:45 PM. Reason: typo

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    I ride road rides most of the times with LBS group rides, to help get my overall endurance up for the MTB trails, and riding in general. At first I was struggling to keep up on my MTB, but when I got a road bike it helped make it easier to keep up. I have done a lfew long road rides one of them 100+miles, and decided riding long on the road isn't for me....i ride my MTB 85% of the time

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    I don't get it either

    Road riding would bore me out of my mind. And I don't think it's safer or better physically either. My uncle is a long-time track and road racer and he has suffered major back problems as a result of the hunched-over position this type of riding requires. And lets not even get into the 800+ people per year killed by motorists while riding on the road.
    Last edited by bykhed; 06-08-2004 at 01:29 PM. Reason: typo

  33. #33
    jrm
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    When you have time/obligation constraints

    Quote Originally Posted by cheetos316
    Just went out for an urban ride today to make use of the awesome weather in the Northeast today although I was dying to get out on the trails and I pondered to myself how the roadies can stay on paved roads all day.... I mean even on urban rides I need stuff to drop, jump, or something to shake things up..... The ironic thing is that I signed up for a charity ride this summer riding from Providence, RI to Seattle, WA thinking it'll be a great way to see the country...... I wonder what I got myself into........
    and riding to and from work is the bulk of your riding during the work week you learn to enjoy it. Alot of the time it can more conveinant to ride the road...

  34. #34

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    different drug

    Endorphins are a better buzz than adrenaline, simple as that.

  35. #35
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    Hmmmm....

    Quote Originally Posted by pacman
    MTB riders of different skills can ride together, on the road it's wheel-suck or get dropped.
    Entirely depends on the group. I've been on nice road rides where everybody rides together and regroups at the top of hills. I've been on MTB rides with riders of very disparate skills, and the only "riding together" we did was the 10-20 feet after waiting for the stragglers to catch up. I find it a lot easier to moderate my pace on a road bike than on a MTB, so I think it's easier to ride together on the road.

    Dave

  36. #36
    The Uber Carnivore
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    George said it for me.

    Way cool doing 50 perfect miles on a bowl of cereal and a cup of coffee. Total freedom.

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    ipod mini

    not to open a can of worms about riding while having headphones on... but i've been getting back in shape, doing more long rides (>2hrs) and having the ipod mini has been great for mountain as well as road rides.

    in the past i've always had buddies to ride with so the ipod wasn't really needed, but recently except for a wheekly morning ride i do with some roadie guys, i mountain bike solo. hopefully that'll change but the ipod makes the miles go by easier --- kind fo cool hitting a hill and suddenly having some soundtrack theme say gladiator or starwars come on... makes you feel kind of pumped!

    john

    Quote Originally Posted by cheetos316
    Just went out for an urban ride today to make use of the awesome weather in the Northeast today although I was dying to get out on the trails and I pondered to myself how the roadies can stay on paved roads all day.... I mean even on urban rides I need stuff to drop, jump, or something to shake things up..... The ironic thing is that I signed up for a charity ride this summer riding from Providence, RI to Seattle, WA thinking it'll be a great way to see the country...... I wonder what I got myself into........
    ride:: ti hardtail

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