Hike-a-bike

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  • 07-04-2004
    jonowee
    Hike-a-bike
    On stupidly steep hills,
    What's the best hike-a-bike techique?
  • 07-04-2004
    Zonk0u
    whatever gets you up the hill. I've been nearly falling over dead tired walking my bike up the hill, and lowered my seat down and layed on it, sprawled out on the monkey bars.
  • 07-04-2004
    TNC
    Use your bike like an ice axe.
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jonowee
    On stupidly steep hills,
    What's the best hike-a-bike techique?

    Seen those climbers on really steep snow/ice covered mountains? While your feet are solidly planted in a good spot on the pitch, push your bike up in front of you and hold the brakes. Take a step or two to get slightly in front of the bar and repeat the procedure. You and the bike can hop-scotch up a fairly steep and even loose pitch-up using this method. The rear brake and tire obviously do most of the work to stick the bike on the pitch. My bike's brakes are set up motorcycle style, so it's a little easier to grab the rear brake from the left side of the bike while pushing up a pitch.
  • 07-04-2004
    jonowee
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TNC
    Seen those climbers on really steep snow/ice covered mountains? While your feet are solidly planted in a good spot on the pitch, push your bike up in front of you and hold the brakes. Take a step or two to get slightly in front of the bar and repeat the procedure. You and the bike can hop-scotch up a fairly steep and even loose pitch-up using this method. The rear brake and tire obviously do most of the work to stick the bike on the pitch. My bike's brakes are set up motorcycle style, so it's a little easier to grab the rear brake from the left side of the bike while pushing up a pitch.

    (A bit off topic but..)
    I don't get why Americans (I use it loosely) use the left- front brake & right-rear brake set-up.
    Moto-style gives right-handers 'better' control of the front brake. I had my old commuter with a left-front brake, and it felt 'uncomfortable', but your brain adapts to it.
  • 07-04-2004
    Steve from JH
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jonowee
    (A bit off topic but..)
    I don't get why Americans (I use it loosely) use the left- front brake & right-rear brake set-up.
    Moto-style gives right-handers 'better' control of the front brake. I had my old commuter with a left-front brake, and it felt 'uncomfortable', but your brain adapts to it.

    As I understand it, right hand front brake is only standard in those countries that drive on the left hand side of the road. That doesn't mean that a lot of riders don't switch over like TNC. But the bikes come from the dealer normally set up left hand front in most of the world.

    I use the same technique as TNC for pushing the bike even when the hills are not so steep and nasty. My knees are so bad that I absolutely have to have some help when hiking and always use ski poles when not biking.
  • 07-05-2004
    KRob
    Old knees like the bike "crutch".
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Steve from JH
    I use the same technique as TNC for pushing the bike even when the hills are not so steep and nasty. My knees are so bad that I absolutely have to have some help when hiking and always use ski poles when not biking.

    My 72 year old dad could walk/hike with his bike as a walker/cane using this technique before his total knee replacement surgery even in rough terrain when he could barely walk down the sidewalk unaided because of his bad knee.

    If the terrain is real rocky or bushy like when I'm bushwhacking, and the wheels won't roll through it, I'll throw it up on my shoulder 'cross style to get it out of my way, but on a trail where the wheels will roll I like the bike-as-iceax method too.