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  1. #1
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    hiding tools and gear inside your bike

    [subtitle- finding new ways to put stuff in all your holes]

    I am bored (it's raining again) and always looking for ways to lighten the load on my back and not have things jangling around in my pockets and bouncy bags strapped onto my bike. I've seen tools like
    OneUp EDC- fits in your steerer tube
    All In- fits in your crank spindle
    Fork Cork fits into the bottom of most steerer tubes so you can hide stuff in there
    Industry 9 Matchstix replaces your front skewer and holds bits
    Ritchey Barkeeper are bar ends that have tire levers attached inside your bar, but I am not sure if they fit in a mtb handlebar.

    any other ideas for sneaky ways to carry gear on your bike without it getting ugly, cluttered, and bouncy?

    I am looking for an expanding plug so i can make a DIY version of something like the Fork Cork or the All In. I tried PVC plugs but the don't come in 1 3/8" for the underside of my fork from what I can find. the ID of my Shimano cranks is in need or something similar. my thru axles are hollow and could probably stache some stuff. any other ideas?

  2. #2
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    You are reminding me of the Golden Gun in the James Bond movie of the same name.

    Specialized has that compartment in their frames.

    Tape can be wrapped anywhere around your bike. Some people like to do it on a pump. Once you have it, it does double duty - you can eliminate it from your first aid kit. I'm a big fan of dual use things like this...

    It's an old trick to put a cork somewhere in the seat post or seat tube and jam a spoke into it. But then you only get one size spare spoke, and it blocks drainage / drying, and a Fiber Fix might do you better.

    You can roll up flat stuff - like a tire boot, or money.

  3. #3
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    You could cram several spokes into a seatpost cork. Unrelated, but I wish hub manufacturers would vary the left/ right flanges of their hubs so that you can use the same size spokes on a wheel build on both sides of the hub.

  4. #4
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    Specialized chain tool / headset top cap:

    https://www.specialized.com/us/en/to...-tool/p/130799

  5. #5
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    In the late 80's Diamond Back had a place to put 3 spokes with nipples on the chainstay. You could have 3 lengths, as long as they were pretty close in length: one front, one rear drive side, and one rear non-drive side.

    Around this same time the guys at Wilderness Trail Bikes were modifying pumps to fit inside their seat posts.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgltrak View Post
    In the late 80's Diamond Back had a place to put 3 spokes with nipples on the chainstay. You could have 3 lengths, as long as they were pretty close in length: one front, one rear drive side, and one rear non-drive side.
    I've seen that on a lot of touring bikes. The Novara Randonee and the Long Haul Trucker had that. If nothing else, spokes can protect the chainstay from chain slap.

  7. #7
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    I've been thinking a bit on stuff like this. And I'm coming to the conclusion that I'm not sure if I want to rely on tools that are designed FIRSTLY to cram into some oddly-shaped empty cavity on my bike.

    A recent mechanical had me fumbling with my Lezyne multi-tool's poor design that limited accessibility of certain tools. It was a real pain in the ass, and made me want to start looking at tools with better usability in mind.

  8. #8
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    Have you considered a frame bag? I put one on my gravel bike, and I'm about to put one on my Unit.

    I only use a pack now if I'm doing a group ride.
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  9. #9
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    I like the idea of mounting stuff to the frame, well small bits that is. I like to feel confident with my tools so not sure I'd like small ones made to fit inside a frame "pocket" per se. However, this is a great topic for discussion.

    I recently made my own frame bag and couldn't be happier. Cost my about $20 in material and time. I'm not so great with the sewing machine so someone with more experience would be able to knock it out much quicker. It's slightly too big but I'm just dealing with it. I have extra material so I'm planning a second one for my make shift gravel bike. It will be a simple top roll version.

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  10. #10
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    Most body cavity compartments would keep the weight down low.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Most body cavity compartments would keep the weight down low.
    Spokes aren't for amateurs though.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Spokes aren't for amateurs though.
    True, butt. . . .


    I had, have a great contribution to this thread but patents and or lack of deter me from posting it.

    If someone else does. . .
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    You could cram several spokes into a seatpost cork. Unrelated, but I wish hub manufacturers would vary the left/ right flanges of their hubs so that you can use the same size spokes on a wheel build on both sides of the hub.
    Get ye a fiberfix.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I'm coming to the conclusion that I'm not sure if I want to rely on tools that are designed FIRSTLY to cram into some oddly-shaped empty cavity.
    I don't see the problem. My favorite tool was designed to fit some oddly shaped cavity.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crash_FLMB View Post
    I like the idea of mounting stuff to the frame, well small bits that is. I like to feel confident with my tools so not sure I'd like small ones made to fit inside a frame "pocket" per se. However, this is a great topic for discussion.

    I recently made my own frame bag and couldn't be happier. Cost my about $20 in material and time. I'm not so great with the sewing machine so someone with more experience would be able to knock it out much quicker. It's slightly too big but I'm just dealing with it. I have extra material so I'm planning a second one for my make shift gravel bike. It will be a simple top roll version.

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    So you are outside the circle and we are supposed to trust you?

    hiding tools and gear inside your bike-701db11d-9568-4eed-af05-9d6ec6a51bdf.jpeg
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    ...I'm about to put one on my Unit...
    I guess if you canít cram stuff in your holes, strapping it on your unit is the next best thing...

  17. #17
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    In the old days, before the pack days, things were crammed into or onto bikes. People were drinking water from a water bottle with a mouth piece full of dust, trail dung or some type of mud. Then came the pack... people were happy...now people are going back to the old ways, to the point of strapping a tube on a frame WTF?! One of my customers and friends did this to his bike and I asked why? HE said because everyone else is doing it, but he still rides with a pack. I would never trail ride with a bottle, seat bag or tube hanging off my frame. Just think of the mud packing under the strap holding a tube, or your bottle full of mud and pushing it back in the cage or pulling it out, nice free sanding job on your frame. Pack for me all the way, with a clean mouth piece to drink from

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crash_FLMB View Post
    I like the idea of mounting stuff to the frame, well small bits that is. I like to feel confident with my tools so not sure I'd like small ones made to fit inside a frame "pocket" per se. However, this is a great topic for discussion.

    I recently made my own frame bag and couldn't be happier. Cost my about $20 in material and time. I'm not so great with the sewing machine so someone with more experience would be able to knock it out much quicker. It's slightly too big but I'm just dealing with it. I have extra material so I'm planning a second one for my make shift gravel bike. It will be a simple top roll version.

    Sent from my LM-G710VM using Tapatalk
    looks good, just need the handlebar bag and you're set...if you're bike packing of course...what I want to know is where did you get the blue turbine cranks?

  19. #19
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    Just buy a Speicalized Stumpjumper with SWAT if you like storage capabilities. I was interested in a few bikes, the SWAT feature was the deciding factor for me. I canít remember the last time I rode with a pack.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wickerman1 View Post
    In the old days, before the pack days, things were crammed into or onto bikes. People were drinking water from a water bottle with a mouth piece full of dust, trail dung or some type of mud. Then came the pack... people were happy...now people are going back to the old ways, to the point of strapping a tube on a frame WTF?! One of my customers and friends did this to his bike and I asked why? HE said because everyone else is doing it, but he still rides with a pack. I would never trail ride with a bottle, seat bag or tube hanging off my frame. Just think of the mud packing under the strap holding a tube, or your bottle full of mud and pushing it back in the cage or pulling it out, nice free sanding job on your frame. Pack for me all the way, with a clean mouth piece to drink from
    Donít ride in the mud.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Donít ride in the mud.
    If I don't ride in the mud this time of year I can't ride...after all it is the Wetcoast.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    I don't see the problem. My favorite tool was designed to fit some oddly shaped cavity.
    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    I guess if you canít cram stuff in your holes, strapping it on your unit is the next best thing...
    touche

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    touche
    I guess you missed post #10 which got them started.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    I guess you missed post #10 which got them started.
    they were funnier :-p

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crash_FLMB View Post
    I recently made my own frame bag and couldn't be happier.
    Armed with a different skill set i built my gravel bike frame to suit a frame bag. It's so sweet being able to stuff an extra water bottle, a sandwich, a change of clothes, my wallet-phone-keys, whatever... in to the bike and transport it invisibly. My jersey is more comfy without using it as utility lovehandles. The load disappears and i can't tell a difference. I wish i'd built my mtb frames to fit frame bags.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    Armed with a different skill set i built my gravel bike frame to suit a frame bag. It's so sweet being able to stuff an extra water bottle, a sandwich, a change of clothes, my wallet-phone-keys, whatever... in to the bike and transport it invisibly. My jersey is more comfy without using it as utility lovehandles. The load disappears and i can't tell a difference. I wish i'd built my mtb frames to fit frame bags.
    It all sound good, but is the bike still ďplayfulĒ?
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by wickerman1 View Post
    In the old days, before the pack days, things were crammed into or onto bikes. People were drinking water from a water bottle with a mouth piece full of dust, trail dung or some type of mud. Then came the pack... people were happy...now people are going back to the old ways, to the point of strapping a tube on a frame WTF?! One of my customers and friends did this to his bike and I asked why? HE said because everyone else is doing it, but he still rides with a pack. I would never trail ride with a bottle, seat bag or tube hanging off my frame. Just think of the mud packing under the strap holding a tube, or your bottle full of mud and pushing it back in the cage or pulling it out, nice free sanding job on your frame. Pack for me all the way, with a clean mouth piece to drink from
    Yep. Iíll always carry my pack. All the water and tools Iíll need and room for anything else.


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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    I guess if you canít cram stuff in your holes, strapping it on your unit is the next best thing...
    Lol!

    I dig my frame bag, today was the first time I wore a pack in a long time, I can deal but I prefer the freedom of not using one. As mentioned, I don't feel the weight.
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  29. #29
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    FWIW, I go back and forth between bottles on the frame and a backpack. for long, hot days, I need the 3L capacity of water. however, I don't like riding with any more weight on my back than is absolutely necessary. when you're not that heavy at 160 pounds, it makes a difference. I could load six spare tubes, a shock pump, a mini pump, a tuxedo, and Thanksgiving dinner in my Osprey Raptor 10 pack (and it's not that big), but that's a lot of extra weight hanging off my back.

    I have a frame bag that I have only used for commuting to work (BITD when that was feasible) and for gravel rides, but I'll try it again. should keep the dust out of my water bottle and keep tools cleaner. it's a triangular Jandd bag that is a little bigger than what I need for most rides and it chafes my knees.

    just trying to figure out how to carry the bare minimum on those days when the weather is nice (not the frequent 104-degree Texas weather) when I am going out for an hour or two but I might end up 20 miles away from home and need to fix my bike. not having things bouncing around in frame bags or packets is nice, and not having it weighing down an overkill backpack is nice too.
    Last edited by mack_turtle; 12-11-2018 at 06:47 AM.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    FWIW, I go back and forth between bottles on the frame and a backpack. for long, hot days, I need the 3L capacity of water. however, I don't like riding with any more weight on my back than is absolutely necessary. when you're not that heavy at 160 pounds, it makes a difference. I could load six spare tubes, a shock pump, a mini pump, a tuxedo, and Thanksgiving dinner in my Osprey Raptor 10 pack (and it's not that big), but that's a lot of extra weight hanging off my back.

    I have a frame bag that I have only used for commuting to work (BITD when that was feasible) and for gravel rides, but I'll try it again. should keep the dust out of my water bottle and keep tools cleaner. it's a triangular Jandd bag that is a little bigger than what I need for most rides and it chafes my knees.

    just trying to figure out how to carry the bare minimum on those days when the weather is nice (not the frequent 104-degree Texas weather) when I am going out for an hour or two but I might end up 20 miles away from home and need to fix my bike. not having things bouncing around in frame bags or packets is nice, and not having it weighing down an overkill backpack is nice too.
    Sounds like you should pull a trailer. ďSix spare tubesĒ really?
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    ...just trying to figure out how to carry the bare minimum on those days when the weather is nice (not the frequent 104-degree Texas weather) when I am going out for an hour or two but I might end up 20 miles away from home and need to fix my bike. not having things bouncing around in frame bags or packets is nice, and not having it weighing down an overkill backpack is nice too.
    I saw this in another thread, which led to further reading:

    https://www.76projects.com/shop/thepiggy

    In my reading I stumbled onto what I believe might be the original awesome strap thread that has since lived on here and will likely live on ad infinitum:

    https://forums.mtbr.com/general-disc...ap-927368.html

    If nothing else, I feel as though I have caught up on some significant history at this place. Now only if I could find those Tony Ellsworth threads...

    Anyway, a comparable alternative to the now infamous Awesome Strap appears to be the RaceFace strap, which had some bad reviews (guys losing their shit mid race).

    Here is one of many articles briefly looking at some of the strap-on excitement out there:

    https://www.pinkbike.com/news/review...tools-mtb.html

    When all is said and done, apart from its cost, that Project 76 product is something that interests me.

    PS - this may be when DJ chimes in with the tried and true seat bag option...

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by wickerman1 View Post
    looks good, just need the handlebar bag and you're set...if you're bike packing of course...what I want to know is where did you get the blue turbine cranks?
    When I ordered the frame from Matt at Samsara Cycles, I also ordered those. Sorry I can't be of more help. I love the frame but he's jacked up the prices since I ordered 2 years ago.


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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by wickerman1 View Post
    In the old days, before the pack days, things were crammed into or onto bikes. People were drinking water from a water bottle with a mouth piece full of dust, trail dung or some type of mud. Then came the pack... people were happy...now people are going back to the old ways, to the point of strapping a tube on a frame WTF?!
    I remember the day I decided to go with the pack. It was hot, the water in my bottle was cool causing condensation.

    I discovered that I shared that trail with horses.

  34. #34
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    Water bottles for shorter winter rides for me. For longer winter rides, a bladder-only camelback under my softshell. Also, when it gets down to single digits and below, even the insulated water bottles will freeze after several hours, so you gotta constantly be thinking about trying to empty them to "use" the water and pacing that with how long your ride is.

    Otherwise, I'm always using a camelback, it's just more convenient for me. When you get super-efficient for racing 30-50 mile races, you can get by with just a couple water bottles, but most mortals can't survive on that many oz in challenging conditions or pace.

    I do like getting some weight off of my back though, I have to be careful not to compromise function as far as having the basic tools and things that I need. I don't feel it makes sense to remove it all though or go to extreme measures, at that point I feel other things are compromised. I have a frame-bag system for my pivot and I can get a good amount of stuff there, enough that I can just use a water-only camelback while racing.

    The other issue is that having 3 bikes (or more), you end up having to either have 3 sets of stuff, one for each bike inside the bike/bags, which gets kind of ridiculous, or you have one set in a camelback. I kind if mix between the two a little, but when you are going out for a ride quick after work, it's easiest to grab one thing that you know has everything you need.
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    I am obsessed with this idea right now. I have read a million things online. It seems to me that the best option (for me) might be the OneUp EDC Pump combo. I am not into tapping my steerer tube, and I prefer a pump over CO2 anyway. The only problem is that there is no built in tube storage feature.

    That 67 Projects under the bottle cage thing I posted above looks good, but after exchange and shipping, fk it. I ain't P Diddy.

    I don't think I can run the successor to the Awesome Strap under my seat as it will interfere with my dropper (as much as I would like to for historical reasons, if nothing else).

    The Race Face Stash tool has bad reviews.

    There are a lot of lame overpriced rubber bands out there as well, like OneUp's.

    It looks like the EDC pump combo may be the best option for me, but there is nothing built in to carry a tube. I suppose I could simply strap a tube under my seat.

    Is there a definitive, packless option out there right now, without selling one's soul to the devil and going full SWAT?

    As an aside, I LOVE my CamelBak Skyline. Apart from heat, I love wearing it. It cradles my whole back and feels awesome to wear. When it is cool, I actually prefer wearing it, than not. But there are a lot of hot 2 hour rides I do where I throw caution to the wind and end up going packless. A totally bad idea that I need to correct before shit goes sideways on me.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    I am obsessed with this idea right now. I have read a million things online. It seems to me that the best option (for me) might be the OneUp EDC Pump combo. I am not into tapping my steerer tube, and I prefer a pump over CO2 anyway. The only problem is that there is no built in tube storage feature.

    That 67 Projects under the bottle cage thing I posted above looks good, but after exchange and shipping, fk it. I ain't P Diddy.

    I don't think I can run the successor to the Awesome Strap under my seat as it will interfere with my dropper (as much as I would like to for historical reasons, if nothing else).

    The Race Face Stash tool has bad reviews.

    There are a lot of lame overpriced rubber bands out there as well, like OneUp's.

    It looks like the EDC pump combo may be the best option for me, but there is nothing built in to carry a tube. I suppose I could simply strap a tube under my seat.

    Is there a definitive, packless option out there right now, without selling one's soul to the devil and going full SWAT?

    As an aside, I LOVE my CamelBak Skyline. Apart from heat, I love wearing it. It cradles my whole back and feels awesome to wear. When it is cool, I actually prefer wearing it, than not. But there are a lot of hot 2 hour rides I do where I throw caution to the wind and end up going packless. A totally bad idea that I need to correct before shit goes sideways on me.
    When you finally discover the holy grail of this dilemma please share. Iíve pondered it over and over and selling ones soul to Specialized for the sole convenience of SWAT is not an option for me.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    I do like getting some weight off of my back though...
    Same here especially in hot weather.

    Landing on a pack full stuff to impale me in a crash creeps into my mind too.

    So for me it's:
    - Frame mount water bottles and Lezyne Pump
    - Cannondale steerer-tube tool kit
    - Seat Bag (Ortlieb 16.5 liter for long trips) with tube, money, snacks, derailleur hanger, etc.

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  38. #38
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    I have a bottle cage with a bottle. I put my stuff in a sock and drop it in the bottle. having it in a sock makes it easy to take stuff out and keeps the rattle down. It can fit most of the stuff I need but I still carry a water pack. It is the desert after all. I know they make those jugs that hold your stuff, but I have piles of water bottles laying around so why buy something I already have.
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    I have a bottle cage with a bottle. I put my stuff in a sock and drop it in the bottle. having it in a sock makes it easy to take stuff out and keeps the rattle down. It can fit most of the stuff I need but I still carry a water pack. It is the desert after all. I know they make those jugs that hold your stuff, but I have piles of water bottles laying around so why buy something I already have.
    Just donít mix up your water bottles and pour liquid into the one that had the sock in it previously. Yuk!
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  40. #40
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    use a new or clean sock. and if you have to use the sock for something other than its intended purpose, such as wiping your ass. also do not put it back in the water bottle.
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    When you finally discover the holy grail of this dilemma please share. Iíve pondered it over and over and selling ones soul to Specialized for the sole convenience of SWAT is not an option for me.
    Frame bags. There are several companies that do this now and IMO just being able to pack a few things makes a big difference.hiding tools and gear inside your bike-img_5286.jpg
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  42. #42
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    I think frame bags are a mighty fine option, Jayem.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  43. #43
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    Does any company call their "in-steerer-tube" or "in-axle" tool the "charger"?
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  44. #44
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    The SWAT compartment on Specialized carbon frames is one of the best inventions ever. It easily fits everything you would need for a day ride on a closed loop trail. I really like not having to strap a saddle pack to the rails. Throw my water bottle in the holder and that's it.

    I've got no dog in the anti-Specialized fight. They make great bikes at decent prices and I've like every Specialized bike I've ever owned (seven, to date) except one (their 650B Stumpjumper...pedal strikes).

    And I hate hydration packs.

    I carry Tubolito tubes and a few more tools on my bikepacking bike (but not that much more) but I could fit the whole kit in the SWAT compartment (just hard to repack in the snow and rain after using something). i use a Relevate Jerry Can pack for tools, lube, and small bits.

    Also, now that I have Tubolito tubes I can fit a decent repair kit into a water bottle-sized container.

    Below is my Tour Divide tool kit...I hope to finish it in 2020 after scratching in 2017.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails hiding tools and gear inside your bike-img-0253.jpg  


  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ailuropoda View Post

    I've got no dog in the anti-Specialized fight. They make great bikes at decent prices and I've like every Specialized bike I've ever owned (seven, to date) except one (their 650B Stumpjumper...pedal strikes).
    ...not... not even a small dog, perhaps? A chihuahua, or a dachshund? A dachshund would fit nicely in a SWAT box....
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  46. #46
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    I love wearing a pack. Right now I use a Osprey Manta thats fairly large and also has a rain fly. The back pouch will carry two short bottles for the dog. I carry full size tools too, like a Bondhus hex set with an 8mm key.

    I only use a frame bottle to squirt mud off my goggles when racing muddy Enduro events.
    Ripping trails and tipping ales

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    I have a bottle cage with a bottle. I put my stuff in a sock and drop it in the bottle. having it in a sock makes it easy to take stuff out and keeps the rattle down. It can fit most of the stuff I need but I still carry a water pack. It is the desert after all. I know they make those jugs that hold your stuff, but I have piles of water bottles laying around so why buy something I already have.
    I bought a no name bottle cage canister for about $5. Holds all I need (tube, plug kit, chain link, multi-tool, a few patches, tyre levers).

    As I'm in Africa I always ride any distance with a hydration pack. The canister keeps the pack weight down.

    If I'm just tooling around town/ going to the bar, I just leave the canister at home and everything is kept together in one place, and I throw the cable lock in the cage.

    IMHO it's a much simpler and cleaner solution than a frame or saddle bag if you're not carrying too much. Less faffing around to remove it and doesn't swing around under your seat.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vader View Post
    I only use a frame bottle to squirt mud off my goggles when racing muddy Enduro events.
    a spare water bottle also doubles as a trail-side bidet. beats burying toilet paper in the woods. carry a dog poop bag and leave yours tied up in the middle of the trail like all the dog walkers do around here and you'll fit right in.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    ...not... not even a small dog, perhaps? A chihuahua, or a dachshund? A dachshund would fit nicely in a SWAT box....
    My doxie would not want to be shoved into a Spesh frame.




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  50. #50
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    I am pretty sure that with a little finesse, I could fit my GF's chihuahua in a large or XL frame...

    hiding tools and gear inside your bike-fullsizeoutput_8f.jpg

  51. #51
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    My wiener might fit in a SWAT box.

    hiding tools and gear inside your bike-20181209_100539.jpg

  52. #52
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    During massive rainstorms a few months back and while awaiting a new frame, I had entirely too much time to think about on bike tool storage.

    I carefully listed all of my on trail failures and tried to solve them based on their frequency and the feasibility of a trail side repair and based my tool kit around that.

    I also am a WW so tried to keep weight low, and also the weight I did have located very low on my bike. And lastly cost was a consideration.

    Here is my thread where I detailed what I did:

    https://forums.mtbr.com/tooltime/too...s-1090800.html

    If you only want the nitty gritty, well I used a ToPeak Ninja storage bottle holder combined with an EDC 100cc pump also filled with tools. For additional reliability I also run a rear tire noodle, an XD rear rim, and Ti cranks. As each of those items addressed a trail side situation I have experienced in the past.

    ~ take car

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    My wiener might fit in a SWAT box.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Thatís not something to brag about.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    My wiener might fit in a SWAT box.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Oh thatís a super cute wiener. One to be proud of and show off.


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  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    During massive rainstorms a few months back and while awaiting a new frame, I had entirely too much time to think about on bike tool storage.

    I carefully listed all of my on trail failures and tried to solve them based on their frequency and the feasibility of a trail side repair and based my tool kit around that.

    I also am a WW so tried to keep weight low, and also the weight I did have located very low on my bike. And lastly cost was a consideration.

    Here is my thread where I detailed what I did:

    https://forums.mtbr.com/tooltime/too...s-1090800.html

    If you only want the nitty gritty, well I used a ToPeak Ninja storage bottle holder combined with an EDC 100cc pump also filled with tools. For additional reliability I also run a rear tire noodle, an XD rear rim, and Ti cranks. As each of those items addressed a trail side situation I have experienced in the past.

    ~ take car
    That's helpful. Thanks.

    I need to carry a tube as well. Twice now I have had an unrepairable flat running tubeless, where a tube was necessary.

    That OneUp stuff is pricey AF. Combined with your Topeak Ninja, sounds like you were north of $300 US!!!

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by stripes View Post
    Oh thatís a super cute wiener. One to be proud of and show off.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    ďCuteĒ is never good.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  57. #57
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    I am working towards going with less of a pack on my back. I have a Fabric water bottle on the bike and a pump strapped under the top tube. I am going to try out the Dakine Hot Laps gripper to hold a tube, multitool and KMC Missing link levers and then a Dakine 2 ltr hip pack to hold an extra bottle and snacks and the remaining few things I carry (small first aid kit, tire patch, cell phone). I'd like to try a fork kit (to hold the first aid kit and tire patch maybe)

    https://www.jensonusa.com/Dakine-Hot...waAsTzEALw_wcB

    https://www.jensonusa.com/Dakine-Hot...saAnnwEALw_wcB

    https://www.worldwidecyclery.com/pro...aAsSqEALw_wcB#
    Last edited by 93EXCivic; 12-12-2018 at 02:20 PM.
    Niner WFO9, Sunday Soundwave (BMX), Nashbar CXSS (town/workout/gravel)

  58. #58
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    Anyone suggesting products in this thread need to supply links for the rest of us. Itís the law.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by 93EXCivic View Post
    I am working towards going with less of a pack on my back. I have a Fabric water bottle on the bike and a pump strapped under the top tube. I am going to try out the Dakine Hot Laps gripper to hold a tube, multitool and KMC Missing link levers and then a Dakine 2 ltr hip pack to hold an extra bottle and snacks and the remaining few things I carry.
    After decades of carry tools on the bike I tried out a backpack to carry tools and water/food. It was ok but in the end, I do not want to carry anything. To that end, I almost never use what I bring so......I need to hire an eighteen year old to drive a sag. That way, I never have to save energy to get home. Ride full out and call for the truck when I am spent. Safe Travels all.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    That's helpful. Thanks.

    I need to carry a tube as well. Twice now I have had an unrepairable flat running tubeless, where a tube was necessary.

    That OneUp stuff is pricey AF. Combined with your Topeak Ninja, sounds like you were north of $300 US!!!
    I hear ya, for me, only one time in 5 years of riding did I really need a tube in the rear tire. My rear noodle gives me a limp home option and with my riding, I'm never more than 3-4 miles hike from the car (and I keep a tube in the truck). My noodles only cost $40 each so if I sacrificed one, once every few years, that's no biggie. Also I get other benefits from running the rear noodle. If I ever was lucky enough to do a big long ride trip I'd 100% strap a lightweight tube to the frame.

    I had all the existing flat repair equipment and wanted to keep using my existing multitool as it was nicer than the EDC tool, and already paid for, so my Lezyne Multitool is the primary thing stored in the ToPeak Ninja Bottle Holder. All I had to purchase was the EDC pump at I think $55 and the ToPeak for like $15, so my total outlay for this solution was a very reasonable cost of around $70.

  61. #61
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    I just have my trail servant carry all that crap.

  62. #62
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    Kick the rugrat out and youíve got all the storage space one could dream of.

    hiding tools and gear inside your bike-0751a489-5be2-46f0-a07e-a9aab158552f.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Kick the rugrat out and youíve got all the storage space one could dream of.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Link?
    The Steel Fleet:


    '14 All City MMD
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  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    Link?
    Most excellent observation. That was a test.

    www.mountainbiketrailers.com
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  65. #65
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    I am waiting for the trail drone that follows you around like a puppy, films your ride, carries your gear, and shuttles you up the long hills.

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    I am waiting for the trail drone that follows you around like a puppy, films your ride
    The first half of this has been done enough times for "top 10" lists to come up.

    https://wiki.ezvid.com/best-auto-fol...SAAEgLas_D_BwE

  67. #67
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    https://sahmurai.com/

    Saw these bar end plugs recently with a tire plug kit in them.
    Niner WFO9, Sunday Soundwave (BMX), Nashbar CXSS (town/workout/gravel)

  68. #68
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    Just put my small Banjo Bros frame bag on my Unit!

    Perfect! Pump, levers, bacon, house key, and I have room to spare. Tube goes in the saddle bag that I need for my bell. Water on the bike= pack freedom.

    My gravel bike already had a medium frame bag.
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  69. #69
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    Thatís all great JC and it looks Lovely I might add. Iím glad you have room for bacon but Iím a bit disappoint that there is no link provided for us that are Google challenged.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Thatís all great JC and it looks Lovely I might add. Iím glad you have room for bacon but Iím a bit disappoint that there is no link provided for us that are Google challenged.
    Ha! I knew it LOL..did that on purpose.

    https://banjobrothers.com/collections/frame-packs
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  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    Ha! I knew it LOL..did that on purpose.

    https://banjobrothers.com/collections/frame-packs
    Ahh... thank you. Bookmarked for future endeavors.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Ahh... thank you. Bookmarked for future endeavors.
    Nice, small company. Its not Revelate but they work just as well.
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  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    I just have my trail servant carry all that crap.
    hiding tools and gear inside your bike-patsy-coconuts.jpg
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    You do know that was just hearsay, no?
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    Ha! I knew it LOL..did that on purpose.

    https://banjobrothers.com/collections/frame-packs

    I'd prefer a link for the bacon
    What a perfect waste of time

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by JackWare View Post
    I'd prefer a link for the bacon
    mmmmm trail bacon
    oops I wasn't clipped in

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by JackWare View Post
    I'd prefer a link for the bacon
    Quote Originally Posted by jim c View Post
    mmmmm trail bacon
    https://www.alltrails.com/trail/us/m...on-ridge-trail
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