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Thread: Hands Tingling

  1. #1
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    Hands Tingling

    first off Im sorry if this is in the wrong forum


    I have a trek Fuel EX5 and after a couple miles of riding, my hands start to tingle and almost fall asleep on me. I purchased some nice gel padded gloves which seemed to of been able to prolong my riding time without this happening.
    Im considering purchasing some of the ergon GP1 grips in hopes that it may help as well.

    Any advice or opinions ? Im thinking my stock hand grips are kind of small and dont provide much comfort.

  2. #2
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    Hold on loosely but don't let go....

    Seriously though you could be pinching a nerve.

    Ergon grips might work. You could try to rotate the bar forward/backward to help with this problem or it could be the sweep of the bar itself. It could be a wrong fit in the set up putting too much stress on your wrist thus pinching a nerve causing your hands to go numb and like I said before hold on firm but not white knuckle as this will cause numbness/tingling as well.

  3. #3
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    Couple a things
    Could be a fit/reach issue. So maybe a spacer under stem, different stem, or bars with more rise. If your bars are much wider than your shoulders, maybe cutting/shortening bars to shorten reach also. Maybe get lbs to help or check out some online fit calculators.
    Maybe some core exercise, including hyperextentions.
    Hold on, but not to tight as Hutch has mentioned, and also don't lean.
    Make sure your brake levers are so when your fingers are on em your wrists are pretty much straight.
    FWIW I have large hands and don't like Ergons. Think they're better suited for smooth stuff but some people like em. ODI rogue are my fav. Much more grippy than Ergons, round and thicker than standard grips.
    Round and round we go

  4. #4
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    This is a common problem, thatís why they make padded gloves. Problem usually arises from constant pressure on the ulner nerve. As others have stated, try cockpit adjustments that get excess pressure off your hands like rotating the bar upwards or moving the saddle slightly back. Try only one thing at a time though, or you will never figure out what helps.

    What helped me was riding more aggressive trails. All the moving around on the bike eliminated the static pressure placed on the hands from just sitting and pedaling along. I still get pain on my road bike, but I find shaking my hands out every now and then or getting out of the saddle tends to help.
    --If you must choose between two evils, pick the one you've never tried before.

  5. #5
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    I was experiencing a similar issue last year. I picked up a set of Ergon GA1 grips and, since getting them adjusted properly, have never experienced the issue again.
    Don't call yourself an AM rider just because you suck at XC

  6. #6
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    The ulnar nerve affects the pinky, ring finger and half of the middle finger. I went through 3 years of surgeries for my shoulder and ulnar nerve. It's not a fun feeling. Even after my surgeries I can only ride a half hour before the feeling kicks in. I am glad to see someone else had tried the Ergon grips and had success. I am going to try and order a set to see it will help me out as well.

  7. #7
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    I get the same thing too, ill be upgrading o the ergon grips so they give you a wider contact patch for your hand
    2012 Diamondback Recoil

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  8. #8
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    I have this problem too. All the advice above is what I've been told and am in the process of finding out what works best to combat. I also get this more when riding static rides, road bike rides for instance. I read an interesting article or post somewhere that related it to those who have jobs that use power tools or anything that vibrates. If not corrected there can be some long term effects. Dang, where did I see that one? Hmm...will have to regoogle.

  9. #9
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    What it really is, too much of your weight is on your hands and not on your saddle and pedals where it belongs. Happens to me all the time, then I lean back.
    NOT a fan or Ergon. Tried the grips, too small for my hands. 1 week later they came out with a large but since the packaging was open they wouldn't allow me to return it. BAD CUSTOMER SERVICE.
    Last edited by abegold; 09-07-2012 at 11:19 AM.
    agmtb

  10. #10
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    Check your saddle position. If the nose points downward it will roll your forward causing more pressure on your hands. Experiment with the tilt of the saddle to find that neutral position.

    Another thing that has greatly helped my hands are to roll the hbar back toward you so they point more toward your hips rather than up toward your chest. Most shops angle the hbars that way because it's the accepted practice. I've found that having the sweep pointed lower takes the pressure off my hands.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by TxTrekRider View Post
    first off Im sorry if this is in the wrong forum


    I have a trek Fuel EX5 and after a couple miles of riding, my hands start to tingle and almost fall asleep on me. I purchased some nice gel padded gloves which seemed to of been able to prolong my riding time without this happening.
    Im considering purchasing some of the ergon GP1 grips in hopes that it may help as well.

    Any advice or opinions ? Im thinking my stock hand grips are kind of small and dont provide much comfort.
    Almost always a bike set-up issue...

    First get the saddle where it needs to be wrt to the pedals....


    Then get the bars where they need to be wrt to the shoulders...

    In the end in a comfortable attack position the wrist should be straight and the elbos bent slightly....

    With the wrist straight the fingers should also rest lightly on the brake lever.....

    That will put the weight on the the "right spot of the hand" not over top of the nerve that runs through your wrist.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    Almost always a bike set-up issue...

    First get the saddle where it needs to be wrt to the pedals....


    Then get the bars where they need to be wrt to the shoulders...

    In the end in a comfortable attack position the wrist should be straight and the elbos bent slightly....

    With the wrist straight the fingers should also rest lightly on the brake lever.....

    That will put the weight on the the "right spot of the hand" not over top of the nerve that runs through your wrist.

    I agree, good rec but my point with the Ergon grips is this.. When your bike is setup correctly, you've tried adjusting it with no luck, give the grips a shot. In my case I rolled the bars - hated it and moved them back, adjusted my saddle - liked it better and left it, but still was getting the annoying tingling feeling in my hands at times. The GA1's did the trick. Not at first, It took a couple times of adjusting them to get them just right but once in place they work like a charm. If you're hands go numb quickly, constantly tingle when you ride, etc... I would say it's probably a bike setup issue as well. If your hands go to sleep / tingle after long static rides, or on long decents, try the Ergon GA1's... They really helped me out.
    Don't call yourself an AM rider just because you suck at XC

  13. #13
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    I agree with above posts that suggest you check your position.

    I do however not agree that your saddle should have some predefined relationship with pedals. Bike fitting is more voodoo than science for the most part, so try lots of different things! Keith Bontrager has an article where he "debunks" the knee over pedal theory; some people love this theory others hate it, and I completely ignore it for the most part.

    Posture is important, pay attention to how you hold your back and try to keep weight off your hands.

    When you pedal hard, its easy to keep weight off your hands, so pay attention to this aspect too.

    I generally advise that when you have hand tingling and you're using your back muscles to maintain good posture, then you probably have your center of gravity too far forward for your pedalin intensity. Move your seat back 1cm and see if there's any improvement.

    The important thing for hand tingling is not how far leaned over you are but where your center of gravity is. this is an important part of bike fit that's neglected in many systems that just look at angles of various joints and limbs. If you have two people who have the same bones and joints and one has twenty more pounds of upper torso muscle, they probably shouldn't have the same position on the bike. Most fit models completely neglect this element of fit (that's their brand of voodoo, what can you do?).

  14. #14
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    I had numbness problems too. The more I rode, the longer the numbness lasted. Riding for 1.5 hours would leave my pinky/ring finger tingling for a week. I tried adjusting my handlebar height so I wouldn't put so much pressure on my ulnar nerve, but it turns out my old bike wasn't adjustable. After getting a new, proper bike, the numbness just... went away. It certainly has a lot to do with geometry.

  15. #15
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    One more thing to try. Take off your backpack & ride for a while. In a couple of cases we found that the tingling was caused by pack straps being too tight.
    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Ninja's Son
    You may be happy to hear that my dad has kicked cancer's ass. Now he's looking for whoever sent it.

  16. #16
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    The solution for me was a shorter stem. My hands would pins and needles so bad I couldn't brake. I was just set up in a position that made it difficult to maintain a neutral position on the bars. I tend to feel that things like gel gloves or ergo grips are a band aid for a bad set -up. I went from a 100mm to a 50mm stem. It felt weird at first, but on my first trail ride the numbness was gone like magic. I'm not saying that the stem is the solution for everyone, but there are a lot of variables that can affect position. It helps to have spares or buddies with extra parts you can try out different parts as well.
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    Fork set up too stiff?
    Not enough sag and small bump compliance?

    I'd dial in fork settings, adjust saddle position-nose up or level so you aren't sliding fwd, and get handlebars at your seat height for starters.

  18. #18
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    Regarding padded gloves: they're not for everyone. Whenever I use a padded glove, I get cramps in my hands.

    Props to Trail Ninja for pointing out that pack straps can easily cause hand numbness. My old Camelback with narrow straps used to cause some numbness issues for me.

    When I occasionally get some numbness, I find that raising my hands above my head brielfy helps. This could be indicative that blood pooling is an element at play for some of us (nerve stimulation being the other cuprit).

    -Pete
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Ninja View Post
    One more thing to try. Take off your backpack & ride for a while. In a couple of cases we found that the tingling was caused by pack straps being too tight.
    +1
    Also use the chest strap. It keeps the shoulder straps from putting pressure on the posterior humeral circumflex artery. Big words to say, the big blood vessel on the inside of your upper arm.
    Your fear of looking stupid is holding you back.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by PinkGorillaCycles View Post
    Check your saddle position. If the nose points downward it will roll your forward causing more pressure on your hands. Experiment with the tilt of the saddle to find that neutral position.

    Another thing that has greatly helped my hands are to roll the hbar back toward you so they point more toward your hips rather than up toward your chest. Most shops angle the hbars that way because it's the accepted practice. I've found that having the sweep pointed lower takes the pressure off my hands.
    I'm with this guy. I had numb hands and tried the Ergons. I didn't like them and they didn't help, then i made stem/spacer and handle bar angle adjustments ect. No help. Then i adjusted the saddle. Having the saddle angled higher did the trick for me. Hope it does for you.

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