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  1. #1
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    Getting into running

    I'm coming off an injury and started running to get workouts in. I do like how it's great for cardio, I can run pushing my kid, can be quick but effective workouts and how you can do it from anywhere. But I do find it boring and can be painful.

    I'm not sure if I'll keep running but curious from the runners on here what would you recommend I do to get into it? Should I just run 20-30 minutes a day or start a program? What excites / motivates you to run?

  2. #2
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    Reputation: Finch Platte's Avatar
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    Boring and painful, for sure.

    I can't help you, but fast walking is the way for me. An hour each morning and I've covered 3 miles. I take my phone and check it once in a while to pass the time. That helps a little.

    Running is hard. Unless you live on the beach.
    I wouldn't even get my hair cut except it's near the liquor store and it seems like my eyebrows need trimming now and then.

  3. #3
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    I enjoy a good run. Less hassle than dealing with bike stuff and I get a really good workout in 60-90 minutes. Carry some water, find shoes that fit well, and just go for it.

  4. #4
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    The secret for me is trail running, though pushing your kid would be difficult. I just love being out in the wood and the trails I run are hilly and twisty (some are the same trails I ride) so I don't see those long distances and think "I gotta run all that?" I do wear earbuds and listen to music, which I would never do while mountain biking.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

  5. #5
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    If I only have a half an hour or so to get some type of workout you really can't beat a run although I hate the thought of it.
    Niner Jet 9 RDO, Scalpel 29, XTC 650b, 04 Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Trek Rigid SS - No suspension, no gears....no problem

  6. #6
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    My suggestion...if possible, avoid running on pavement. Not to state the obvious but compared to biking, running is much more high impact. My joints get significantly less pulverized running on dirt (or on a treadmill in winter or for interval training, but that increases the boring factor 100-fold).

    Also, interval training. Especially if you don't have too much time. I have some friends and relatives who are SERIOUS runners and Iron Man junkies. Some of them refer to non-interval training as "junk miles". 20 minutes of honest balls to the wall interval training should leave you with little gas in the tank.

    I am not an avid runner by any stretch but when I have trained for events, I have tried to run 3 or 4 times a week, including one long-ish run (for me - usually 25 kms), interval training (which is MUCH easier to regulate on a treadmill) and a hill climb.

    As for motivation, sign up for a half marathon. That will motivate you to train. Also, I really enjoyed using Runkeeper (although Strava will work just fine if that's your jam).

  7. #7
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    Get some decent running shoes, so that you don't get injured.

    When I started running 3 years ago, I wore gym shoes and quickly developed plantar fasciitis. I got proper shoes and the problem went away. My initial goal was to do a long run and short runs every week. Soon, my long runs got longer. For my short runs I focus on speed by doing sprints alternating with an easy run (eg 400, 800, 1600 metre intervals)

    I like to mix up terrain: pavement, gravel, and trails; lots of hills. I like running on back country roads rather than urban. But I do like to mix it up. I bring along my camera (a light point and shoot) and snap pics.... theres always something interesting along the way.

    Yup running can get boring especially if you're hurting but there definitely is a high when you get into a routine or style that works for you
    F*ck Cancer

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  8. #8
    Nat
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    I started running while rehabilitating from an injury and subsequent surgery.

    Definitely run trails instead of road if you can. Technical terrain is fun since you have to pick a good line (just like mountain biking).

    Don't feel like you have to run non-stop the entire time. Stop to rest and look around if you want (just like mountain biking).

    It takes a couple of miles for me to warm up before I get into that flow state but once there there's no feeling quite like it. Getting there kind of hurts though.

  9. #9
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    Get a dog!
    Is this where I write something witty?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    I started running while rehabilitating from an injury and subsequent surgery.

    Definitely run trails instead of road if you can. Technical terrain is fun since you have to pick a good line (just like mountain biking).

    Don't feel like you have to run non-stop the entire time. Stop to rest and look around if you want (just like mountain biking).

    It takes a couple of miles for me to warm up before I get into that flow state but once there there's no feeling quite like it. Getting there kind of hurts though.
    Before trail running, I'd recommend walking/running for a couple of weeks on level ground to get those ankles strengthened. You get on a rocky trail and it's easy to twist an ankle.
    I wouldn't even get my hair cut except it's near the liquor store and it seems like my eyebrows need trimming now and then.

  11. #11
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finch Platte View Post
    Before trail running, I'd recommend walking/running for a couple of weeks on level ground to get those ankles strengthened. You get on a rocky trail and it's easy to twist an ankle.
    Probably a good idea.

  12. #12
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    I had my stint with running and may pick up back up soon.

    First: I can destroy my joints and tendons if I run carelessly in a couple hundred yards. I was able to run and not do that by focusing on taking smaller steps. It was much easier on my body. If I wanted to go faster I forced myself to move my legs faster, not lengthen my stride.

    Second: for the first couple months I did not listen to music (I always do when biking). Running is not as familiar to me as biking, and I could not afford the distraction. It was important that I kept focus and listened to my body, step after step.

    Third: sometimes to change it up I would run on the beach, and there are cliffs at my beaches so I would run up and down the stairs as I went. Sometimes I did trails. Sometimes I would do a stair workout at the local highschool to change it up. Variety was nice!

    Fourth: shoes. Once I had figured out my stride I went to Roadrunner and they did a foot scan, took video of my feet when on a treadmill, all this stuff. I spent the $100 on shoes that they recommended and felt good. It was a massive improvement.

    I wasn't training for anything specific, but I was able to run twice per week in addition to other activities. It took me about 10 weeks until I just went out after work and did 13 miles at about 8min/mile, which was amazing to me. I somehow just pulled a half marathon out of my butt.

    Hopefully this helps! Good luck!

    Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk

  13. #13
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    Shoes are the single most important component, don't skimp. Ease into it, don't increase distance more than 10% a week.
    It ain't supposed to be easy.

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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by life behind bars View Post
    Shoes are the single most important component, don't skimp. Ease into it, don't increase distance more than 10% a week.
    The 10% rule seems to be really legit - speaking as someone who had pretty good cycling fitness, but not really good running fitness. I amped up my running miles too fast and messed up both my calves. 1 yr. + to full recovery.

    But I always used to run with the jogging stroller (10 yrs. back now). My daughter loved it. Started out flat, slow, and ~2mi. Got much faster, hilly-er, and farther. Solo runs felt like I was unleashed! We have lots of options here: pavement, gravel, MTB trails, hike only trails, hills, flat, mixed terrain... Hammering up a giant hill and not being tired at the top is one of those awesome things.

    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  15. #15
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    dont land on you heels when you run, land on the ball. most people dont know this and ruin their knees over time

  16. #16
    Nat
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    You might want to find a running forum. Some of the advice I've read in the thread is suspect and open for debate in the running community. Would you ask a running forum if you should use clipless vs. flat pedals?

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    You might want to find a running forum. Some of the advice I've read in the thread is suspect and open for debate in the running community. Would you ask a running forum if you should use clipless vs. flat pedals?
    Yes, because they'd be just as clueless as we are

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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    You might want to find a running forum. Some of the advice I've read in the thread is suspect and open for debate in the running community. Would you ask a running forum if you should use clipless vs. flat pedals?
    For we all know, none of the advice on mountain biking found in the mtbr forums is suspect and open for debate, right?
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

  19. #19
    Nat
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    Especially you two.

  20. #20
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    I go daily but don't really care for it, getting the dog out for a good run after being cooped up in the back yard is one of my best motivators.

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  21. #21
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    I run when the trails are too muddy to ride. Or if I don't have much time. It's easier and faster to walk out the front door and run for a few miles than to get the bike and gear loaded and drive to a trailhead.

    But I pretty much hate every minute of it. I can usually get in the top 5%-10% of riders on strava, both up and down. But trying to do a 8.5 minute mile pace for 2 miles makes me want to die. I never really get to the point when I feel like I'm in the zone. Its a like a necessary evil to keep up some kind of fitness when I can't ride.

  22. #22
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    science.. go run barefoot, landing on your heels. see how long that lasts. then go run barefoot landing on the ball of your foot

    your body

  23. #23
    Nat
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    Oyyy veyyy.

  24. #24
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    Yay running!

    I run 20-30 miles/week. Currently trying to set a PR in the 5k (sub-19, ignoring high school XC - I doubt I'll ever go sub-17 again). Currently right at 20, so have a bit to go.

    I try to do all my longer (8+ miles) runs on trail. I have a nice park 2 miles from my door, so I'll run over, do 4-5 miles, then run home. Or, park the car at the LBS (1 block from the park), run a 10 mile loop, then have coffee/beer at the shop after.

    Good running shoes are important. If you're trying to run on 10 year old trainers that you use for mowing the lawn, stop that nonsense and go to a proper running shop. They'll put you on a treadmill, watch your stride, possible video it, and recommend some shoes that are appropriate based on your body weight, pronation, mileage, etc.

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