Follow up review of Northwave Grizzlies (winter shoe)- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Follow up review of Northwave Grizzlies (winter shoe)

    So I got my Grizzlies yesterday. I put them to the test today.
    Ride length 30.72 miles
    Ride Time 02hr:03:10
    Temp 40 deg. (taken via a thermometer clipped onto the back of my back pack)

    The winter shoe is a size 46. I normally were size 44 (Specialized) and could do size 45 but they're just a teeny tiny bit to big. The size 46 of the Grizzlies left me plenty of room to wiggle my toes and my foot was not snug at all. I could have put another Columbia sock on (which I did but I'll get to that) and the shoe would not feel small with room for one more thin layer sock maybe another wool sock.I started out wearing a thin dress sock (nylon and breathable/moisture transfer) and one merino wool hiking sock from Columbia. My feet were "forgettably" fine and warm for about 38:00 minuters. After this time very slowly I started to think my feet were starting to get a tad cold. About 1hr into the ride I knew that my feet would be getting cold. After 1.5 hours I had to stop and put on my second pair of Columbia socks that I had brought in case I needed them. Keep in mind that I'm riding back country roads too. The second layer of Columbia socks never really warmed my feet up and after five to ten minutes my feet were back to getting colder. I finally arrived home at 02:03:10 hrs. My feet were freezing and if I had to stay out another .5 hrs I don't think I could have stood it.

    Key points to remember: cirulation was good and movement unrestricted. When I got home I felt the shoe it felt cold inside and out. The material felt the same temp as my feet. So my general impressions are this...

    For some reason I just can't find a way to keep my feet warm in cooler/cold temps. I don't know what the windchill effect was of my riding speed but I'm sure it was lower than 40 deg. Although no wind was penetrating my shoe I feel that the air temp outside gradually became the air temp inside the shoe. Even with two pairs of merino wool socks plus the sock liner I have no clue as to why my toes were still so cold. While the rest of my foot was cold too my toes were definitely the coldest. I do not yet have an opinion as to the waterproofness ability of this shoe as I haven't had an oppurtunity to test them out in the wet. Next I will be looking at a full wool sock as well as some moisture vapor socks such as Sealskins (spelling?) and trying the same ride in the relatively same or colder temp. Right now these just won't due for winter riding unless I can get the heat to my toes. I don't recommend these for true winter boots and I'm once again left wondering just how much better the lakes are.

  2. #2
    Nat
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    Boy, 40F isn't even that cold and your feet got chilled. Were you warm around your torso? How did your arms, legs, and head feel?

  3. #3
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    everything else was fine

    every other part of my body was fine, nice and warm. I'm measuring the temp by the thermometer and I backed it up by weather.com. However there was frost on some cars as I passed a car dealership. For some reason my feet, toes in particular, have always just gotten cold easily. I have never had frostbite so I'm not more suseptible that way and I don't have diabetes or anything. Still forty degrees is nippy, it's not that warm

  4. #4
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    Hmmm

    It sounds like you have poor circulation in your feet. I ride down down to -5 with a liner, wool sock combo in my Sidi Bullets which have a lot of mesh. My feet are fine unless they get wet. Where did you get the Grizzlies? Are the a wider shoe?
    Formerly Travis Bickle

    Team Robot. "modulation is code for “I suck at brake control.” Here’s a free tip: get better."

  5. #5
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    double hmmm...

    The shoes I got off of Ebay, new not used. They are wider but I think this is mainly due to them being one size bigger than I normally wear. I've wondered about the poor cirulation but when just walking around with normal hikers and usually just regular tennis shoes my feet are fine in the winter. So I'm not sure. I'd love to see a foot specialist but then I don't have insurance. I used the shoes today in 55 ish weather and my feet were hot. Not super hot but hot none the less. The other thing is that I would think poor foot circulation would not allow someone to play a full range of sports with no issue (i.e. constant injuries or such). I don't know this however just speculating. I'll have to look into this more. Thanks

  6. #6
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    Warm feet

    Guys who ride year round in the colder parts of Canada will get off their bikes and walk or jog for a bit when their feet are near freezing. The walking moves blood in the feet.
    Formerly Travis Bickle

    Team Robot. "modulation is code for “I suck at brake control.” Here’s a free tip: get better."

  7. #7
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    Yeah, that is a little weird. I only double up on my normal ankle high bike socks and wear my normal mesh Answer Speeders at 40 without undo coldness of the toes. Of course those rides are usually less than two hours. It sounds like time played a factor. But still, i wouldn't expect my feet to get cold at all with that set up even down to 20 degrees and below.
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  8. #8
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    I have always had a hard time keeping my feet warm. Not biking though, living in the woods when I was active duty. I always thought I had "bad" feet. At some point I realized that though I did not notice it my feet were sweating, enough so that once they got a little bit cold it was too late. My socks were very slightly damp and so were my boots. Unless I am out for 5-6 hours I wear jungle boots in the winter now (except deep snow). One layer of good wicking socks. My feet do a lot better now that the moisture my seaty feet produce has someplace to go. It may seem weird but you might need to give them some more air. From my personal experience, change your socks, but adding a second pair just makes things worse. Of course, everyone has something different that works for them.
    Good luck, i can handle almost anything but cold feet and hot beer. (Warm beer is just fine).

  9. #9
    Crunchatize me Capn'
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    actually

    the sweating/moisture point is good also. I checked and the inside of the shoe was just as cold as the outside. The thermal lining in the shoe was slightly damp like my socks. I wonder if by adding that second layer of socks I was actually keeping the cold in as insulation works to keep whats out from coming in and vice versa. I think what I will do now is try walking for a little while if my feet get cold. If this "solves" the situation for awhile then I will know it's a ciculation issue. If, even after walking, I find my feet haven't warmed up at all I figure it's the moisture issue. I'll post an update in a week or so. Thanks to all. Good ideas.

  10. #10
    SSasquatch
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    Spray on Antiperspirant

    Keeps the feet from sweating as much, reducing cold feet. I have very sweaty feet and used to do winter lake surveys on remote (hike in only) lakes and ponds in northern new england where it gets mighty cold on the ice. After several bouts with frostbite, an old timer that I worked with told me that it was an old army trick and kept his feet warm. Using that and good moisture wicking socks has greatly improved my feet's cold weather tolerance. Don't use the roll on as it just balls up into little nasties in the socks.

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