Fitness Bikes, Rigid Frame Hybrids, Flat bar road bikes- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    mm9
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    Fitness Bikes, Rigid Frame Hybrids, Flat bar road bikes

    Who rides a bike like this for fun or training? Seems like the bike industry is still trying to settle upon a name for this category. I have what was called a "fast city" rigid frame hybrid. It has 700c wheels and flat bars. I find that it's a blast for training around my suburban community. It's quick and responsive and handles well. It also had the strength to do light off road and drop of curbs etc.

    I like the betweener category (between mountain and road bikes). I think some of these bikes look sexy. They remind me of a category in motorcycling called supermotard, which started when they put street tires on a dirt bike.

  2. #2
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    My old schwinn traveller has flat bars, knobby tires, and a rear rack on it. Fun bike when I'm riding with the kids/family.

  3. #3
    AZ
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    Sounds like the worst of both categories.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ View Post
    Sounds like the worst of both categories.
    What does, a flat bar road bike? I disagree, for many if not most people, a hybrid or flat bar road bike with 35mm tires on it would be more than they ever need.

    People like you, like me, and many on these forums likely like a bike specific to what we do the most. But I imagine in the scope of the population, we are the minority.

    I have 10-12 bikes, of all different variety. And I still turned my old schwinn roadie into what I stated above, and added a triple to it. Probably one of the most fun bikes I own and will never get rid of.

  5. #5
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    Cyclocross with flat bars? Having always owned MTBs and never a road bike this appeals to me. Looking thru the cyclocross sub forum we are not alone, but we are a minority.

    I'll be the "guy" with wider road tires, flat bars and flats. I don't give two $hits what anyone else thinks, rides what you want OP.

  6. #6
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    Have any of you checked out the Surly ECR? And what do you think? I for one think it looks bad ass, but I have not seen one in person yet.

  7. #7
    mm9
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    Quote Originally Posted by _Alberto_ View Post
    I don't give two $hits what anyone else thinks, rides what you want OP.
    I've had all types of bikes through the years. Road bikes, mountain bikes - rigid and hard tail, banana seat bikes etc. I agree. I don't pick a bike to ride because of what others think. For single track, I currently ride a hard tail 29r, Cannondale mountain bike. For training around my home, I put some street tires on an old Trek rigid frame mtb. Loved the sensation of the smooth roll on the asphalt, but with the ability to jump curbs and obstacles etc. We live in a hilly area and the tires just fly on the street. Cornering is like riding a motorcycle.

    So, a few years ago I stared seeing these sleek rigid framed hybrids with 700c wheels at my LBS. Knowing that I liked that sensation of riding my old mountain bike with street tires, I theorized that I would enjoy a bike like this. I do!

    I added some small lights front and back, plus clipless pedals. One of my favorite things to do is go bomb through local neighborhoods at night. It's a rush. The tires roll so smoothly and the bike is nimble and reacts quickly. I like the hybrid sized street tires because they can take a hit, and I like the flat bars for the control, especially when I hit some debris of some sort in the road while it's dark. I cut through neighborhoods, schools, churches, behind businesses etc. Kind of a fun, fast hooligan ride.

  8. #8
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    mm9-any pics of that bike? Sounds like a blast.

  9. #9
    mm9
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    Before I added the lights, clip-less pedals etc.

    Last edited by mm9; 12-23-2013 at 07:32 PM.

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    What is that? Looks comfy and fun.

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    I have my mtb bikes for trail us, a dedicated road bike for longer rides, and a hybrid for riding around the neighborhood with my family and general riding when I don't feel like wearing my cycling shoes.

  12. #12
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    Great thread. I bought a single speed, steel CX bike last year and built it up to be an urban, neighborhood, city bike. It's fun to ride and a great break when I'm not on my road bike or riding the trails on a FS XC. I try to commit to at least one ride a week on this bike, dedicated to nothing more than spending an hour or so just enjoying the ride, not worrying about the avg. mph or hitting technical sections. The funny thing is that running it as a SS, I still get a somewhat of a workout.

  13. #13
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    I put flat bars on my Salsa Vaya last summer and I love riding it. It was comfortable with drops, but I love it with the flat bars. I use it for long fitness rides, commuting, and riding around with my kids. I have a Salsa Casseroll single speed that I put flat bars on also, but it doesn't see much action since I converted the Vaya to flat bars.
    I considered buying a Cannondale Bad Boy or Quick before I converted my Vaya, but this was the cheapest way for me to go. I may buy my wife a Cannondale Quick soon.
    Flat bar road bikes are awesome and I am glad to see them getting some love. If you are like me and in it for fun and fitness, and not speed so much, it really works.
    Have fun.

  14. #14
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    Personally, I find drop road bars to work the best for me, perhaps because of the multiple hand positions I can use. Riding flat bars on the road for more than 30 min or so and my hands and wrists start to hurt, go numb, etc.. It happens on the mtb too if just riding flat trails. That's just me tho.

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    Lone Ranger, I took a long while to lose the drops for the flats on my Vaya for this reason. I actually put a set of Salsa Bend Bars on it which have a 17 degree sweep. I like it. But don't discount bar ends as solving the multi hands positions problem.
    But whatever works best for someone is all that matters.

  16. #16
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    I got a road bike for those times that I wanted to ride, but didn't have enough time to pack up all the gear, load up the bike, and drive to the trail head. Initially I didn't like drop bars but now I really love them and think anyone believing they aren't as comfortable as flat bars is doing themselves a disservice. Drop bars have numerous hand positions you can take advantage of and a position that helps keep your body streamlined against wind.

    Shiggy even rides with drops on his mountain bike.

  17. #17
    mm9
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    I enjoy drop bars also, but the bike came with flat bars and I do like the flat bars when jumping curbs, or doing a small amount of offroad on the routes around my home. I do like the beefier frame and slightly bigger tires/rims than come on a road bike. I think that's a good compromise.

  18. #18
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    Check this thread out from cannondale also. some nice bikes there.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/cannondale/ca...rk-847794.html

  19. #19
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    Here's my "hybrid". Kind of a home-grown, suspended version of a Cannondale Hooligan
    Framebones 29r belt drive, Surly 1x1mid-fat, Nashbar SS 29r half-fat, TommiSea Fatbike, FGFS/Loopwheel, Mini-velo/MTB :ihih:

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by P7HVN View Post
    Here's my "hybrid". Kind of a home-grown, suspended version of a Cannondale Hooligan
    That's a cool bike, what size wheels?

    And that bike really looks like a supermoto bike, here's it's twin rut-rut version.
    https://static.hothdwallpaper.net/51...703f544671.jpg

  21. #21
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    Here is my "road bike". Air 9 with 35 mm tires.

    Fitness Bikes, Rigid Frame Hybrids, Flat bar road bikes-air9-4.jpg

  22. #22
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    [QUOTE=jbrow1;10893396]That's a cool bike, what size wheels?

    And that bike really looks like a supermoto bike, here's it's twin rut-rut version.
    QUOTE]
    Thanks. Wheels are Sun Rhino lites(406's) with 1.95 Hookworms. Built strictly as a fun bike, for local bike/ped path, which it excels at. Next project is 20" Loopwheels, on a rigid frame MTB....
    Have a DRZ Supermoto in my garage too.
    Framebones 29r belt drive, Surly 1x1mid-fat, Nashbar SS 29r half-fat, TommiSea Fatbike, FGFS/Loopwheel, Mini-velo/MTB :ihih:

  23. #23
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    I have a Sirrus Expert with a lot of carbon fiber on it, 105 components, and White Industries/DT Swiss wheels. It has the same cockpit as my racing steel hard tail. I also owns Roubaix, fully carbon Ultegra/DuraAce level bike. I've got thousands of road miles over 35 years, centuries and such.

    For urban riding the Sirrus is far superior to any road bike I have ever had. Handling demands are far greater in an urban setting; stop & go, tracks, curbs, potholes are all much better handled for me with a flatbar/riser and fingertip access to controls.

    I was in a shop the other day and a young employee said he had never seen such nice wheels on a hybrid. So young, so new to the sport. He was about 30. I've been riding longer than he has been alive.

    I'm selling the Roubaix.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Fitness Bikes, Rigid Frame Hybrids, Flat bar road bikes-sirrusexpert81411mtbr.jpg  

    I don't rattle.

  24. #24
    mm9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkeley Mike View Post

    For urban riding the Sirrus is far superior to any road bike I have ever had. Handling demands are far greater in an urban setting; stop & go, tracks, curbs, potholes are all much better handled for me with a flatbar/riser and fingertip access to controls.
    I think you've captured part of what I was trying to say. All bikes have tradeoffs. For the type of riding that I do, this kind of bike seems to make the most sense. It's not fast enough for a true Road ride, nor would it be very good on a true mountain bike ride. But for training around town, it's my favorite way to ride and train.

  25. #25
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    I saw a REALLY chi-chi full carbon C'dale Quick this past year. It was a sweet bike. Hybrids have come a long way in the past 10 years or so. Used to be you only had one geometry option - really upright and slow. But nowadays you've got some out there with much less upright geometry options, with lighter components that make for a fun bike.

    I'm not sure I could ever enjoy riding a bike with tires narrower than 30mm, to be honest. I just don't enjoy being beat up by the terrain I'm riding.

    I never thought about putting flat bars on my Vaya, but I could see it being a fun bike that way. How did you handle sizing, philoanna? I've got On-One Midge dirt drops on mine with a "short" 90mm 17deg stem. A pro fitter probably would want a longer stem for me, but I like being a little more upright so I can see traffic better (it's my commuter). Do you have a more upright position with the swept flat bars?

  26. #26
    mm9
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    I thought about this thread as I was riding today. In the sport of motorcycling there are sport bikes for the folks that want to go the fastest on roads. These are kind of like race oriented road bike bicycles. Then there are dirt bikes. Kind of like mountain bikes. A Harley is a cruiser - kind of like a cruiser bicycle. Fun, but not really very effective for going fast on street, and especially dirt.

    There are some in the middle categories: A small dualsport motorcycle, might be like a comfort hybrid bicycle. They are usually ridden easy and are often ridden by beginners and folks that don't want to be too serious. There are two a relatively newer categories: performance dual sports and super motos (or super motards). These types are faster, more performance oriented motorcycles. Same with the new performance hybrid and performance fitness bikes (heard those terms today). A little more comfortable to ride and a little more upright for enjoying the ride are dealing with rough terrain challenges, but still made with light weight and performance components. More of a serious enthusiast or serious fitness riders bike.

  27. #27
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    Re: Fitness Bikes, Rigid Frame Hybrids, Flat bar road bikes

    I've had hybrids. Once I had a proper mountain bike and long before I figured out how to set up my first road bike, I was done with hybrids.

    Yeah, drop bars take a little getting used to. But with my weight distribution right, I'm steering from the hip anyway. So it's just a matter of not screwing it up by putting them too low and far, or any other kind of wrong. And once I rode a 'cross bike off-road, I thought, "wow, this is what hybrids should be."

    For now, I've got two road bikes, a track bike, (all with drop bars, two race-legal,) two mountain bikes,

    and no hybrids.

    And yes, I've had commute and load-bearing bikes.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  28. #28
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    Here's the old schwinn I put flatbars on. Put bullhorns on for another hand position, triple crank, 27" x 1 1/8" kenda knobbies on it. Fun old bike and it's my wear regular clothes and just chill out on a bike, bike. Great for family rides and it's just fun to ride.

    Fitness Bikes, Rigid Frame Hybrids, Flat bar road bikes-old-schwinn.jpg

  29. #29
    mm9
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    Out riding my hybrid yesterday. A serious road bike rider passed me going in the other direction. I raised my hand and greeted the follow bike rider. He just looked at me and sneered.
    Last edited by mm9; 01-01-2014 at 05:13 PM.

  30. #30
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    just went out for first ride on new commuter, charge scourer. I was using an old cheap hardtail with 1.5 slick tyres, but wanted a hybrid or flat bar for higher gears whilst retaining comfortable position. not a lot of flat bars with rack mounts, being a sweaty person I really don't want a backpack.
    The category is certainly a compromise in all areas, but it has to be. I have stretches of long top gear flats, heavy inner city traffic, has to carry the kid and tow the trailer sometime. wide flat bars are the best compromise for me, will add short bar ends later

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