Experienced rider with newb rider in Moab- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    43

    Experienced rider with newb rider in Moab

    I'm an experienced rider (Moab and other places) and I'm taking my 17 yo nephew to Moab for spring break! I'm experienced enough that I tend to forget how hard it can be for beginners. I don't want to spend a week riding the Brand trails or even Gemini Bridges type rides (not all the time anyways, maybe a few rides). I have pretty ambitious plans to ride a lot and ride hard. But in the back of my head I'm wondering if he is ready for Porcupine (hopefully most of Enchilada?) Amasa Back and Slickrock and Moab Rim, Gold Bar and Flat Pass.

    He is in decent shape (can probably kick my butt on a road bike) just doesn't have much riding experience. The few times we have been out on trails around Bend, Oregon he has done well but Moab is a whole other technical level. I'm OK with him being slower then me just don't want him to end up dead or injured (that would really piss my sister off!) I also think he will be game to try it all but may not be smart enough to realize he is in over his head.

    So for you veteran riders who have rode Moab with less experienced riders what do you think? Throw him out there and see what carnage ensues or leave him in camp chained to a picnic table?

    Thanks for the thoughts

  2. #2
    Sweep the leg!
    Reputation: Caffeine Powered's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    3,803
    Whether it's Moab or a local trail anywhere, it's the experienced rider's responsibility to guide the beginner safely. Take the nephew on the easiest sections first then ask him what he thought was challenging. Then give him pointers and hopefully his skills will progress. Wouldn't it be great if by the end of the vacation he was leading you on the trails?
    Authorities speculate that speed may have been a factor. They are also holding gravity and inertia for questioning.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    43
    I fear that will be the end result! I fear it will make me feel old. It will be good. We've talked about what to expect on this trip. I think he will be fine with whatever Moab throws at us. The safety issue is mostly a slow down issue and I don't mind doing that at all.

  4. #4
    All fat, all the time.
    Reputation: Shark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    8,153
    Quote Originally Posted by Caffeine Powered View Post
    Whether it's Moab or a local trail anywhere, it's the experienced rider's responsibility to guide the beginner safely. Take the nephew on the easiest sections first then ask him what he thought was challenging. Then give him pointers and hopefully his skills will progress. Wouldn't it be great if by the end of the vacation he was leading you on the trails?
    I agree.

    I have ridden the Whole Enchilada, Slickrock, Amasa Back & a few others out there. The large majority of the "scary parts" are easily walkable so as long as you stick together I'm sure he'll be fine. What a great experience! Have fun!

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: swingset's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    348
    I think it's more important how you lead him than where you lead him.

    Remember, being young and being a male, he's going to likely feel pressure to keep up with you or do things outside of his experience or comfort level. You need to assure him that it's fine not to tackle every obstacle, or feel the pressure to be on your rear tire...ride his own ride, walk it where he's unsure....you'll wait for him if you get a little ahead.

    He can probably ride most of Moab's trails if he's sensible, and he could also hurt himself very badly by riding over his head.

    That's all on you, you're the adult leading him.
    "Wait, this thing doesn't have a motor?" - Socrates

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    43
    You guys are making points that I wasn't clear on. I want to ride the trails, not dominate them. I have no problem walking sections and I don't want to get hurt myself. I also have no problem waiting for him. I will 'guide' him. I've told him he doesn't have to go on every ride but I'm sure he is going to wreck at some point as well I.

    I will reign him in where I can and try to keep him from getting in over his head.

  7. #7
    Bike's hmmm nice
    Reputation: merijn101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    302
    Been there a few years ago. Road trip with friends that hardly ride, we had 1 day in Moab. In the shuttle bus other guys ask us to join in for the whole enchilada. I was soooo ready for it: fit and 15+ years of riding exp. Had been reading about those supers trails for years and years.... But my buddy had little fitness and not much skills. So I made the choice to let go, dry my eye's and "just" go for slickrock. It was super fun and for sure the max for my buddy. When you go out as a team, you should match the least fit rider and have a some spare. Being over from Holland it was hard not to go for a a big classic, but I have had those moments when I put my own fun before by friends experience. Most of those end in carnage and tears.....
    Start slow and expand if you feel your nephew has space for that. But keep in mind that you should judge it because he might not know when he has to much until he actually goes over the edge (fitness, strength, fear etc.). Slow down or stop before you hit that spot to keep the fun factor!

  8. #8
    Ride More, Work Less
    Reputation: heyyall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    7,774
    Ride the easy trails several times before advancing and only advance if he wants to. This will help the boy better understand the dynamics of the ride along with gauging his comfort level. Leaving him wanting more is a success; an injury or a newly introduced fear is a failure.
    Craigslist & MTBR --free ads for all

  9. #9
    Probably drunk right now
    Reputation: Ken in KC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,749

    One other aspect....

    Moab is the dessert. Heat related illness and death are part of the reality of riding there.

    My 17 yo son knows "everything". Based on his lack of experience, it's really important that you're aware of his health. Be sure he's drinking enough water, watch for signs of heat exhaustion and stroke, make sure he's wearing sun screen, etc.

    As others have mentioned, you're his care taker.

    Have fun. Sounds like an epic trip.
    JPark - 3.5- don't listen to dremer

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Anonymous's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    2,797
    17 year old boy and physical exertion. I hope you budgeted $40K for groceries.
    Your fear of looking stupid is holding you back.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.