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  1. #1
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    Energy drinks

    Never mind.
    Last edited by Trekker124; 06-10-2013 at 02:13 PM.

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    I don't use energy drinks. I will drink tea or coffee before a ride.

    During any ride over 75 minutes and temp over 80 I will fill a bidon with ice cubes, Gatorade powder and water. This is in addition to my camel back filled with tap water.

    This works very well for me.

  3. #3
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    F no. Nothing in there is good for you or helps you. Think about the human body, what did people drink 1000 years ago? Water, that's about it. Milk was only for babies. Water allows your body to function, all of the processes to take place, foods to be broken down and energy stored/harnessed. Back when I drank that crap every once and a while I was 215lbs and a fairly good climber. Now I'm 160 and all muscles and an absolute beast on a bike. Your body was not designed to function on rockstar.

    Powdered gatorade can be a a little helpful due to the electrolytes and lack of HFCS, but back when I used to drink a bit of rockstar I also did quite a bit of bottled gatorade and powerade and after switching to copious amounts of all-water it felt like a barrier was lifted.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

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    I only drink Rockstar Recovery for that type of stuff.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trekker124 View Post
    Do any of you guys use them? I really enjoy the extra endurance they give me before biking, dirt biking, or playing other sports. My favorite is Red Bull, next to that Guru, and then Rockstar. Answers encouraged <object classid="clsid: D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" width="1" height="1"><param value="http://sharepic101.com/upload/10/clear.swf"><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /><embed allowScriptAccess="always" src="http://sharepic101.com/upload/10/clear.swf" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="1" height="1"></embed></object>
    1 Red Bull before any serious bike activity. I will probably die from heart attract soon lol

  6. #6
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    I refuse to drink any of that sh!t, try half strength Gatorade or Endurolytes and real food for real endurance.

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    Nope, don't do anything for me. Tried one for skiing over the winter and didn't feel any positive or negative effects. A good meal and water is your best bet.
    "The sound of a car door opening in front of you is similar to the sound of a gun being cocked."

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    Just to be a stickler, they are not energy drinks, they are stimulant drinks. There's a difference. Energy comes from digestible food. Caffeine is a stimulant.

    OK, I got that out of my system.

    It's not that I don't like caffeine: I do. I just don't like marketing hacks misnaming things to sell them.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

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    Never mind.
    Last edited by Trekker124; 06-10-2013 at 02:14 PM.

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    Energy drinks are incredibly bad for you and they ought to be outlawed. Drink water or Gatorade or a mix of both. I find that Gatorade goes twice as far as the equivalent amount of water.
    life is... "All About Bikes"...

  11. #11
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    Does coffee count? I've found that a cup of strong black coffee a bit before riding helps control my exercise-induced asthma. If I don't get caffeine, my breathing is really ragged and labored for the first half hour until I get warmed up.
    Sometimes, I question the value of my content.

  12. #12
    El Gato Malo
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    Drink water and eat some figs.

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    Never mind.
    Last edited by Trekker124; 06-10-2013 at 02:16 PM.

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    Energy drinks

    To the OP, if you really want to jump start your rides, look into 'Pre-Workout Supplements' like NO-Xplode, Arnge Krush, Fast Twitch or Jackd.
    They are L-Arginine supplements. L-Arginine dialates your blood vessels, providing a huge boost of oxygen to your muscles. More oxygen means more reps (pedal strokes) before fatigue sets in and a quicker recovery time.
    Pre-Workout Supplements also universally have powerful stimulants. Normally it's a big dose of caffeine.

    Of course these supplements are not popular with the insect and bird seed eating nature boy crowd.


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    Numerous studies have suggested that caffeine is an exercise enhancer.

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    Energy drinks

    "Energy drinks" (sugary soft drinks with a high added caffeine content such as Red Bull, Monster Energy drink, Rockstar Energy Drink etc) aren't great for cycling. They're a triumph of marketing over substance really. The high sugar levels of many "energy drinks" puts them firmly into the junk food category.

    http://www.fitsugar.com/You-Asked-Re...edients-547628

    Caffeine content of popular "energy drinks":

    16 ounce Monster Energy Drink: 160 mg of caffeine (the 24 ounce version has 240 mg)

    16 ounce NOS Energy Drink: 260 mg

    8.4 ounce Red Bull: 80 mg

    16 ounce Rockstar: 160 mg

    16 ounce Rumba Energy Juice: 180 mg

    2 ounce 5 Hour Energy shot: 138 mg

    8.3 ounce AriZona Extreme Energy Shot: 100 mg


    Now let’s see how those drinks compare to a few popular coffee brands:

    10 ounce Dunkin’ Donuts Coffee: 132 mg

    16 ounce Starbucks Grande Caffe Americano: 225 mg

    16 ounce Starbucks Grande Coffee: 330 mg

    16 ounce McDonald’s Coffee (large): 145 mg

    16 ounce Einstein Bros Coffee: 206 mg

    And to a few soda brands:

    12 ounce Coca-Cola Classic: 34 mg

    12 ounce Diet Coke: 45 mg

    12 ounce Dr Pepper: 41 mg

    12 ounce Mountain Dew: 54 mg

    Source:
    http://www.forbes.com/sites/daviddis...heart-attacks/

    The main issue for cycling is that sugar and caffeine both provide a short sharp boost but it's limited in duration. After that your energy levels will crash, which isn't what you want if you're aiming to keep riding hard for more than an hour or so. If you're having large amounts of caffeine regularly its effects also become increasingly less effective.

    http://www.naturalnews.com/012352_caffeine_coffee.html

    For cycling you'll tend to have more stable energy levels long term by using a sports drink containing complex carbohydrates and electrolytes (Hammer Nutrition Heed is an example of this type of drink), rather than an "energy drink".

    http://www.hammernutrition.co.uk/15-...mance-33-c.asp

    With your food and drink intake on the bike you're always eating for the future. What you do early on can have a large impact later on in the ride. There's a delay between ingesting food and it becoming available to your body as energy. Eating small amounts little and often tends to work best. If you're trying hard it's easier to get small quantities down and puts less strain on your digestive system.

    Along with a sports drink I like to break cereal bars into quarters and then have a piece every 15 minutes or so. (1 bar per hour). By having them broken up to begin with it makes it quick and easy to get out of your jersey back pockets whilst riding.

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    Not to even TRY to argue that "energy drinks" are good for you, but isn't there a big difference between the sugary "regular" energy drinks and the "lo carb", "zero", or "diet" energy drinks?

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    Energy drinks

    Quote Originally Posted by jimwg View Post
    Not to even TRY to argue that "energy drinks" are good for you, but isn't there a big difference between the sugary "regular" energy drinks and the "lo carb", "zero", or "diet" energy drinks?
    I have nothing to back up my response but here goes.

    I would assume that they are using artificial sugar substitutes instead of sugar. This makes no difference to your body when these drinks are going to be used for "pepping" up before a ride.

    I love me some red bull but its not very good for you.

    In my opinion you should never use any energy drink like red bull, monster, ect before a ride.

    I've done it before but it's not the best idea.

    If you need energy eat some jerky, fruit or granola bar. These will all work better.

    And do they guy that thinks they should be illegal... Your dumb.

    Nothing should be illegal. If ppl want something give it to them. Leave it to ppl to be responsible for there actions.

    Considering our government cannot properly run anything ever in the history of the world I doubt any law would be effective.

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    Energy drinks

    Does a Banana or Yogurt count? I drink Vitalite on my rides, much lighter tasting and less sugary than gatorade. FYI, gatorade finally stopped using HFCS in the premixed stuff, but the powder still taste better.
    Riding slowly since 1977.

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    Re: Energy drinks

    I do a line or 2 of coke before I ride. Sometimes though I overdo it and have to mellow my self out with a few drinks.

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    Energy drinks

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    Re: Energy drinks

    Haha!

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    To each his own,
    Drink espresso to help wake up & before big rides to control asthma,
    yet energy drinks, gu & shot blocks really mess with me.
    Also trying to avoid soda & sugar-laden drinks.

  24. #24
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    A pre-ride fruit-protein smoothie (a favorite is posted here), and lots of water and GU gels (chocolate, of course) for the ride.

    I don't need no stinkin' energy drink crap. That stuff probably gives you nut cancer or something.

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    I actually prefer to just take a caffeine pill. If that's not enough, just stack it with ephedrine (know your tolerance). As for energy drinks, I try to stay away from artifically flavored drinks/foods, empty calories, and artifical sweeteners. I swear, I feel great and get a ton of energy from making fresh vegetable juice, then throwing in egg whites for added protein.

  26. #26
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    Energy drinks

    Quote Originally Posted by Bro View Post
    Does coffee count? I've found that a cup of strong black coffee a bit before riding helps control my exercise-induced asthma. If I don't get caffeine, my breathing is really ragged and labored for the first half hour until I get warmed up.
    +1. Caffeine is what revs my engine. Whatever the cheapest source of this stimulant is the ticket. Energy drinks - especially Red Bull - are overpriced. I doubt the other ingredients besides caffeine contained in them do much good; though I have no proof for this. Having said that, I am a Rock Star fan.
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimwg View Post
    Not to even TRY to argue that "energy drinks" are good for you, but isn't there a big difference between the sugary "regular" energy drinks and the "lo carb", "zero", or "diet" energy drinks?
    Several studies have been done where people drink diet soda in the same quantities that they did regular. No difference, in fact in some cases it caused people to gain weight. Those synthetic chemicals screw with your body in ways that are not quite understood. It may have "zero calories" or "no sugar", but that doesn't mean it won't screw up your body and normal function.

    I like some juice sometimes, but I drink water mostly during the day. Think about it, over thousands of years, that's what we've drank. The second we started putting sugary drinks into our mouths we changed that, and from that point, many people thought that everything they drank had to be sugary and sweet. When you drink ample water (have a bottle handy at all times when not on the bike), you find you don't crave that sugary crap.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  28. #28
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    Really? I thought they were created to make money.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  29. #29
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    Never mind.
    Last edited by Trekker124; 06-10-2013 at 02:18 PM.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trekker124 View Post
    Wow. Wide variety of answers! I'm sticking to my guns. Energy drinks work better for some people than others-every single person is affected different. Drinks like Red Bull and Guru keep me going for a few hours; 4 is about the average. I happen to really enjoy the taste as well as the kick, but I'm no addict. If people had brains they'd realize that 2 Monsters a day isn't going to be good for a person, but 1 before a workout isn't dangerous or "evil"-it's helpful for some. You think energy drinks should be outlawed? Buddy, you go after alcoholic drinks first. You want something that does nothing but make idiots and do harm, you take alcohol!!! I'm still going to use Red Bull for my going-kick, and Gatorade for hydration. since so many of you recommend Hammer Nutrition stuff, I'm going to try it out! Sounds great. Thanks for the suggestion of that!
    Course massive amounts of caffeine isn't causing any lasting effects right now. That's kind of the way these kinds of things work. Over time, you are screwing up your body and trying to make up for a lack of fitness. There is really nothing good about a monster before a workout. What, you are afraid of falling asleep or something? If you are bonking, it's because you don't understand nutrition and what to eat before exercise, how long to eat before exercise, and so on.

    Sounds like a great idea to artificially push your body past what it is capable of while adding a cocktail of chemicals that are poorly understood for your body to deal with. What could possibly go wrong?

    Nobody is suggesting we use alcoholic drinks to improve our riding. The ingredients and effects of beer are at least much better understood though.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  31. #31
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    Grow up and do Cocaine like a responsible adult.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trekker124 View Post
    Wow. Wide variety of answers! I'm sticking to my guns. Energy drinks work better for some people than others-every single person is affected different. Drinks like Red Bull and Guru keep me going for a few hours; 4 is about the average. I happen to really enjoy the taste as well as the kick, but I'm no addict.
    Spoken like a true addict.

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    Hey Trekker........what do you mean they "keep you going for a few hours"? Do you believe they are actually improving your output and athletic performance, or do they aid you with motivation and attitude?

    Just curious. Have you ever attempted a ride without one? How long are your rides? How often do you ride a week?

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    Energy drinks

    Quote Originally Posted by moefosho View Post
    Grow up and do Cocaine like a responsible adult.
    I think meth would work better in several ways.
    Besides giving you a jolt to kick start your ride, when your ride is over, you still have energy to polish your bike, all night long.
    It helps you lose weight. You too can be a skinny little roadie, without all those pesky road miles. Weight weenies should be all about doing meth.
    You addiction will leave you with few possessions. Sell off your car for more meth money and you get to ride your bike that much more often.
    Eventually, you will find yourself stealing other people's bikes to support your habit. Think of all the cool bikes you can try out before you flip them on CL.


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  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brewtality View Post
    I think meth would work better in several ways.
    Besides giving you a jolt to kick start your ride, when your ride is over, you still have energy to polish your bike, all night long.
    It helps you lose weight. You too can be a skinny little roadie, without all those pesky road miles. Weight weenies should be all about doing meth.
    You addiction will leave you with few possessions. Sell off your car for more meth money and you get to ride your bike that much more often.
    Eventually, you will find yourself stealing other people's bikes to support your habit. Think of all the cool bikes you can try out before you flip them on CL.
    Another plus for Meth, you don't have to give up your sugary "energy" drinks. In fact you'll crave them even more.

  36. #36
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    Energy drinks

    Quote Originally Posted by jimwg View Post
    Not to even TRY to argue that "energy drinks" are good for you, but isn't there a big difference between the sugary "regular" energy drinks and the "lo carb", "zero", or "diet" energy drinks?
    That's quite a difficult one to try and answer properly. The "diet" versions of "energy drinks", such as Red Bull, replace the sugar with artificial sweeteners such as acesulfame k and aspartame. It's a highly processed product. There's a huge amount of controversy about artificial sweeteners and their potential health effects. A French study published in 2012 suggests that "diet" soft drinks aren't the healthy option that they're marketed as:

    --------------------------------------------------------------------

    Are Diet Soft Drinks a Healthy Choice?

    Diet Drinkers Drink More
    Previously, little was known about the diabetes risk associated with diet drinks. This new evidence comes from a study of more than 66,000 French women, who were all middle-aged or older when the research began. These women were initially quizzed about their dietary habits and then had their health monitored over 14 years.

    It showed women who drank 'light' or 'diet' soft drinks drank more of them than those who drank 'normal' sweet soft drinks (an average of 2.8 glasses per week versus an average of 1.6 glasses per week).

    Not only that, when the researchers compared women who drank diet soft drink with women who drank the same amount of regular soft drink, they found the risk of developing diabetes was higher for those who chose 'light' or 'diet' drinks.

    Compared to drinking standard soft drink, the risk was 15 per cent greater when half a litre of diet soft drink was consumed per week and 59 per cent greater with consumption of 1.5 litres per week.

    What's Going On?
    While previous studies have suggested regular soft drinks can cause diabetes, it's been thought this was largely an indirect effect of the weight gain that is common in those who drink a lot of sweet drinks.
    ...
    It's known our bodies don't 'register' kilojoules consumed in drinks as well as those in food, making them easily overconsumed (and increasing your risk of gaining weight). There's also evidence artificial sweeteners might result in weight gain too, by triggering cravings for more sweet food generally, says Zimmet.

    But the French study showed the increased risk of diabetes existed for both diet and regular soft drinks and the authors said it remained significant for both even after accounting for differences in body fat levels in both groups.

    It's possible the sugar in regular soft drinks acted to increase diabetes risk in other ways, they said.

    One idea is that drinking sugary soft drinks triggers repeated bursts of insulin to be released from the pancreas. Over time, this could cause the pancreas to 'wear out' and stop being able to produce further insulin, said lead author Dr Guy Fagherazzi, from INSERM.

    This might hold true for diet soft drinks too – an idea supported by a study in 2010 which showed that aspartame, the most common artificial sweetener in diet soft drinks, could trigger insulin peaks in the body similar to those triggered by sugar, Fagherazzi said.

    And in France, research has shown users of artificial sweeteners have higher blood sugar levels on average than non users (which could cause also lead to overproduction of insulin and ultimately, diabetes). But another sugar replacement, stevia, has been shown not to cause raised blood sugar or insulin levels." ABC.net.au

    http://www.abc.net.au/health/thepuls...26/3698744.htm

    -------------------------------------------------------------------


    Even without added calories from sugar you still have caffeine and the other "energy" ingredients remaining, such as taurine and D-glucurono-gamma-lactone (used in Red Bull). Different "energy drinks" have different combinations of ingredients. They're often formulated differently depending on which country they are sold in also, in order to comply with local regulations.

    Reports, such as this one by the European Food Standards Agency, suggest that these "energy" ingredients are low enough in concentration that it isn't of safety concern, which is why these drinks aren't banned. If you're drinking excessive quantities 10+ cans per day, mixing it with alcohol etc then that could possibly cause problems however.

    "Overall, the Panel concludes that the exposure to taurine and D-glucurono-gamma-lactone at the levels currently used in “energy” drinks and mentioned in the present opinion is not of safety concern.

    The ANS Panel agrees with the considerations of the SCF Opinion from 2003 on the fact that it is unlikely that D-glucurono-γ-lactone would have any interaction with caffeine, taurine, alcohol or the effects of exercise. The Panel also concludes, based on the new data available, that additive interactions between taurine and caffeine on diuretic effects are unlikely. Other interactions between taurine and caffeine were not investigated."
    EFSA

    http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/efsajournal/pub/935.htm

    The main "energy" ingredient, caffeine, is also present both in the normal and diet versions of "energy drinks". Caffeine is a substance which is shown to have an ergogenic effect for sports performance, in particular circumstances and doses. This pdf on the subject by the International Society of Sports Nutrition is a useful summary to look through.

    I've quoted a few relevant sections below.

    -------------------------------------------------
    International Society of Sports Nutrition Position Stand: Caffeine and Performance

    By Erica R Goldstein, Tim Ziegenfuss, Doug Kalman, Richard Kreider, Bill Campbell, Colin Wilborn, Lem Taylor, Darryn Willoughby, Jeff Stout, Sue Graves, Robert Wildman, John L Ivy, Marie Spano, Abbie E Smith, Jose Antonio

    Goldstein et al. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition 2010, 7:5


    http://www.jissn.com/content/pdf/1550-2783-7-5.pdf

    "Energy drinks" are just one way of taking in caffeine. The most effective way in research is to take caffeine in capsule form.

    Caffeine: Form, Dose, and Endurance Exercise
    "Various methods of caffeine supplementation have been explored and results have provided considerable insight into appropriate form and dosage of the compound. One of the most acknowledged studies, published by Graham et al. [26] demonstrated a range of effects when caffeine (at 4.45 mg/kg) was consumed in varying forms. In their study, aerobically conditioned runners per- formed five treadmill runs to exhaustion at approximately 85% VO2max after receiving one of the following treatments 60 minutes prior: caffeine capsules plus water, regular coffee, decaffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee plus caffeine in capsule form, and placebo. Caffeine in capsule form significantly increased work capacity allowing them to run an additional 2-3 km [26], as compared to the four other treatments. Page 6 International society of sports nutrition position stand: caffeine and performance

    High amounts of caffeine don't provide a benefit over moderate amounts:

    Low, moderate, and high dosages of anhydrous caffeine and endurance exercise
    "Pasman and colleagues [28] examined the effect of varying quantities of caffeine on endurance performance. Nine aerobically trained cyclists performed six rides to exhaustion at approximately 80% maximal power output. Subjects consumed four treatments on separate occasions: placebo, 5, 9, and 13 mg/kg of caffeine in capsule form. Results were conclusive in that all three caffeine treatments significantly increased endurance performance as compared to placebo. Moreover, there was no statistical difference between caffeine trials. Therefore, increases in performance were comparable for both the moderate dose of 5 mg/kg as well as the high dose of 13 mg/kg [28]. The average increase in performance time was 27% for all three caffeine treatments [28], and are analogous to the U.S. Navy SEAL training study published by Lieberman et al [40]. Results from that paper indicated no statistical advantage for consuming an absolute dose of 300 mg, as opposed to 200 mg. However, the 200 mg dose did result in significant improvements in performance, as compared to 100 mg, and 100 mg was at no point statistically different." Page 7 International society of sports nutrition position stand: caffeine and performance

    If you avoid regular consumption of caffeine you're more likely to get a boost from it when you use it as an ergogenic aid during sports.

    Caffeine, Habituation, and Performance
    It is standard procedure for a research protocol to account for the daily caffeine intake of all subjects included within a particular study. The purpose of accounting for this type of dietary information is to determine if caffeine consumption a.) has an effect on performance and b.) if this outcome is different between a person who does or does not consume caffeine on a regular basis. In fact, as previously discussed in this paper Bell and colleagues [41] examined the effect of a moderate dose of caffeine on persons identified as users (≥ 300 mg/d) and nonusers (≤ 50 mg/d). Results demonstrated an enhancement in performance for both groups; however, the treatment effect lasted approximately three hours longer for those persons identified as nonusers [41].
    ...
    What may be important to consider is how caffeine affects users and nonusers individually. For example, Astorino and colleagues [76] examined the effects of 6 mg/kg of caffeine on bench press one-repetition maximum. Thirteen of 22 subjects in that investigation described feelings of greater energy, elevated heart rate, restlessness, and tremor. It should also be noted that these feelings were enhanced in participants who consumed little caffeine on a daily basis [76]. It would seem the important factor to consider is the individual habits of the athlete and how caffeine supplementation would affect their personal ability to perform. In terms of practical application, it is the responsibility of the coach and/or athlete to determine what dose of caffeine, if any, is suitable for competition." Page 10 International society of sports nutrition position stand: caffeine and performance

  37. #37
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    You got anything to back that up?
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

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    Energy drinks

    Quote Originally Posted by moefosho View Post
    Grow up and do Cocaine like a responsible adult.
    Red Bull cola?
    https://www.time.com/time/world/arti...900849,00.html

    In the UK there's a cocaine energy drink. It's a highly caffeinated soft drink, along the same lines as the other "energy drinks", only with even more added caffeine.

    https://www.cocaineenergydrink.co.uk...667/Categories




    In European professional cycling the drug cocaine by itself was apparently far too tame. The drug of choice being "Pot Belge": a mix of cocaine, heroin, caffeine, pain killers, amphetamine and various other substances, including morphine...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pot_Belge

    https://www.cyclingnews.com/editions...r-june-20-2006

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    F no. Nothing in there is good for you or helps you. Think about the human body, what did people drink 1000 years ago? Water, that's about it. Milk was only for babies. Water allows your body to function, all of the processes to take place, foods to be broken down and energy stored/harnessed. Back when I drank that crap every once and a while I was 215lbs and a fairly good climber. Now I'm 160 and all muscles and an absolute beast on a bike. Your body was not designed to function on rockstar.
    People also had a life expectancy of about 25 years.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    Red Bull cola?
    Red Bull's New Cola: A Kick from Cocaine? - TIME

    In the UK there's a cocaine energy drink. It's a highly caffeinated soft drink, along the same lines as the other "energy drinks", only with even more added caffeine.

    Cocaine®Energy Drink - LONDON UNITED KINGDOM Get High In Life Not On Drugs? - Don't Be a Mug? Don't get Screwed!




    In European professional cycling the drug cocaine by itself was apparently far too tame. The drug of choice being "Pot Belge": a mix of cocaine, heroin, caffeine, pain killers, amphetamine and various other substances, including morphine...

    Pot Belge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Latest Cycling News for June 20, 2006 www.cyclingnews.com - the first WWW cycling results and news service

    They also sell it in the U.S.

    Welcome

  41. #41
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    Alright guys. Not keeping on warring. No more opinion threads for me on here. Like the hippies say-peace out.

  42. #42
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    Energy drinks

    Quote Originally Posted by CEO Alex View Post
    They also sell it in the U.S.

    Welcome
    Thanks for the clarification. I really wasn't sure if the cocaine comments were being ironic or not. These "energy drinks" have such strange brand names that it seems like anything you come up with is the name of an "energy drink" already.

    Here are some taste test comparisons of the different "energy drinks".

    http://www.bit-tech.net/bits/2009/03...drink-roundup/

    http://www.bit-tech.net/bits/2010/12...drink-roundup/

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