Edgy dudes and women on Full Suspension Road bikes- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Edgy dudes and women on Full Suspension Road bikes

    I did a quick search but I couldn't find a lot of good full suspension road bikes. It seems logical to me that if people do rough trails on light rigid bikes that certain Road people would prefer to do their road work on heavy bikes with very plush suspensions that slow them down considerably but are very comfortable.

    Is this a thing?

  2. #2
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    23c tires offer plenty of cush

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    Ragley Big Wig, Sunday Soundwave (BMX), 91 Schwinn High Plain (about town bike), Nashbar CXSS (on trainer)

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    um, what? Picard?

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    Lol

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  6. #6
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    If your gravel rides require full suspension and 50c tires, maybe you should be on an XC bike.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Champion_Monster View Post
    I did a quick search but I couldn't find a lot of good full suspension road bikes. It seems logical to me that if people do rough trails on light rigid bikes that certain Road people would prefer to do their road work on heavy bikes with very plush suspensions that slow them down considerably but are very comfortable.

    Is this a thing?
    Not really. A gentleman posted yesterday asking about what old full suspension he should get for road riding as he found a non-suspended bike too harsh at his age. I think most people who would want suspension on a road bike would also not want the body positioning of a true road bike. So they ride a mountain bike or a hybrid bike with a suspension fork on the road.

    Sorry Harold, can't give you rep yet.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

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    Scarlett Johansson loves my hummus.

  10. #10
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    Also road dropper...because drops and ďRoadĒ gap jumps.


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  11. #11
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    And the hits just keep on coming.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Next thing you know, someone will be suggesting adding a small electric motor to assist with pedaling.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

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    I think I've seen more Santa Cruz bikes, ENVE wheels, etc. on the paved local pathway around here than on the actual trails.

    No, they are not on the way to doing any sick shredding.

    FWIW, I'm surprised that droppers aren't a bigger thing on road bikes. While trying to get more aero on descents it seems like being able to drop your saddle could be more comfortable.

  14. #14
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    For sure a gravel bike with a bit of suspension would be nice.

    ill never own one. Just based on personal preferences.

  15. #15
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    Full suspension bikes on the road are for weenies.

  16. #16
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    Yeah, edgy weenies

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    The captain does not ride road bike. He is not a road wennie. Kapish.!

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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shinkers View Post
    I'm surprised that droppers aren't a bigger thing on road bikes. While trying to get more aero on descents it seems like being able to drop your saddle could be more comfortable.
    Itís a weight penalty thing.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shinkers View Post
    FWIW, I'm surprised that droppers aren't a bigger thing on road bikes. While trying to get more aero on descents it seems like being able to drop your saddle could be more comfortable.



    More comfortable than the supertuck?

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by 93EXCivic View Post
    https://ninerbikes.com/pages/the-mcr-9-rdo

    OMG LOVE the 9er. No reason for edgy when you have awesome.

    https://www.cannondale.com/en-us/bik...p%20descending

    Seriously, had no idea that fat framed wonders like this were even out there!
    I had no idea that equipment had quite gotten to this level, been some changes in the last 6 years I think.

    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Yeah, edgy weenies


    Yes, as edgy as you can be pushing 35 pounds up a hill in splendid comfort and noticing more details about the scenery- really appreciating it's full beauty with enough time to take a deep visual dive instead of whizzing past.

    It's a thing but one of those wonder bikes above can't count.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTSession View Post
    If your gravel rides require full suspension and 50c tires, maybe you should be on an XC bike.


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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shinkers View Post
    FWIW, I'm surprised that droppers aren't a bigger thing on road bikes. While trying to get more aero on descents it seems like being able to drop your saddle could be more comfortable.
    I put this on my 'road' bike. There's no cartridge, so it doesn't return automatically, but it's easy to pull it back up. It's quite convenient to be honest, and light, so little weight penalty there. The main problem is, you really can't pedal when it's dropped. So on descending, you are faster by being lower and out of the wind, but you lose the ability to spin fast which helps a true, lighter road bike go faster when descending. In addition, road bike top tubes are usually very high, with minimal length available for seatpost travel, which would negate any benefit of a dropper, I imagine.





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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timothy G. Parrish View Post
    The main problem is, you really can't pedal when it's dropped. So on descending, you are faster by being lower and out of the wind, but you lose the ability to spin fast which helps a true, lighter road bike go faster when descending.



    Have you ever seen Sagan pedaling in the supertuck?


    IME pedaling above around 35mph is a waste anyway, you'll go faster if you just coast & tuck.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Have you ever seen Sagan pedaling in the supertuck?


    IME pedaling above around 35mph is a waste anyway, you'll go faster if you just coast & tuck.
    I think he meant the mere mortal canít pedal in the tucked position.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    I think he meant the mere mortal canít pedal in the tucked position.
    Yeah. As someone who can pedal while sitting on the top tube and in the drops, being that flat from the waist up really doesnít feel good when pedaling. It basically smashes your nuts. Not something I recommend to most people. It is definitely faster than just tucking though, especially if you are trying to get up to speed in a hurry.


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  26. #26
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    Mere mortals don't need to pedal in the supertuck position.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Mere mortals don't need to pedal in the supertuck position.
    Yep, your point wasn't lost on everyone. I think the question is, can one bomb even faster with a dropper? I think, haven't not tried one on a road bike, I'd at least be able to corner with more confidence. Supertuck can get sketchy for this old cat.

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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Have you ever seen Sagan pedaling in the supertuck?


    IME pedaling above around 35mph is a waste anyway, you'll go faster if you just coast & tuck.
    I have, and one can, it's just not as easy and as efficient. You're squished down on the bike and spinning is much harder.

    I've hit 50 MPH when adding pedalling to tucked descending where typically I'd hit only 45-47 while coasting, so it's not a waste...for me at least.

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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Yep, your point wasn't lost on everyone. I think the question is, can one bomb even faster with a dropper? I think, haven't not tried one on a road bike, I'd at least be able to corner with more confidence. Supertuck can get sketchy for this old cat.

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    Yes, one can bomb faster with a dropper.

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  30. #30
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    Studies have shown that the internet adds approximately 5mph and 100 watts to the average rider.

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    https://forums.mtbr.com/fifty-years-old/

    ^this forum also has a terrific discussion of Viagra.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crankout View Post
    Unlock the Vermont page, would ya?
    Iím not a moderator. Canít help ya there.


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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    https://forums.mtbr.com/fifty-years-old/

    ^this forum also has a terrific discussion of Viagra.
    Will this Viagra make one faster? Asking for a friend....

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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Studies have shown that the internet adds approximately 5mph and 100 watts to the average rider.
    Lol. And so true.


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  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timothy G. Parrish View Post
    I have, and one can, it's just not as easy and as efficient. You're squished down on the bike and spinning is much harder.

    I've hit 50 MPH when adding pedalling to tucked descending where typically I'd hit only 45-47 while coasting, so it's not a waste...for me at least.

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    Iíve hit 64 on the MTB just tucked. After I spin out, I use a 1 arm tuck and get slippery.

    I f the dropper allows you to be safer and more importantly NOT BRAKE, then I guess it makes you faster. Confidence is half the battle. I can also go fast because I know I can slow it back down in a hurry with Discs and large tires when I need to stop.

    We have some steep hills in Austin that you will do 50 down if you can just manage the turns and brakes.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Champion_Monster View Post
    I did a quick search but I couldn't find a lot of good full suspension road bikes. It seems logical to me that if people do rough trails on light rigid bikes that certain Road people would prefer to do their road work on heavy bikes with very plush suspensions that slow them down considerably but are very comfortable.

    Is this a thing?
    Just pop some 40C tyres, & some cheap lightweight Carbon bars on your bike, & you're set. Maybe add a Carbon seatpost, for a little bit more compliance. That will take the sharp, harsh vibration out of the ride, which is what hurts more than full on wheel denting hits.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by ljsmith View Post
    That was my first thought on reading this topic since I have one and refer to jokingly as my full suspension bike.

    If I was wanting a really soft ride on the road I'd just stick some slicks on something like my Fuel, I think it's a good point made earlier that people who want such a soft ride will probably not want the more aggressive riding position of a road bike either. I have used the Fuel as my road bike on a couple of occasions when I've injured myself and the road bike is too harsh.
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  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shinkers View Post
    I think I've seen more Santa Cruz bikes, ENVE wheels, etc. on the paved local pathway around here than on the actual trails.

    No, they are not on the way to doing any sick shredding.

    FWIW, I'm surprised that droppers aren't a bigger thing on road bikes. While trying to get more aero on descents it seems like being able to drop your saddle could be more comfortable.
    I ride my "slowest" mountain bike on the paved path to slow me down for safety 'n sheeit. Riding a road bike is just scary. Plus the tires are really loud so I don't need a bell!

  39. #39
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    I love riding my Cutthroat everywhere with 2.2" gravel tires. The extra cushion is just flat out nice. I average 12-13mph on flat sections of road but I'm totally fine with that.
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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Battery View Post
    I love riding my Cutthroat everywhere with 2.2" gravel tires. The extra cushion is just flat out nice. I average 12-13mph on flat sections of road but I'm totally fine with that.
    That's what I average on singletrack, up, down, and all around, and I'm fine with that too.
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  41. #41
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    At 80 psi, my road tires are forgiving enough.

    Or less. I ride a lot of road and feel that letting some air out of my tires is all the cushion I really need. I don't want to complicate my road bike with suspension, discs, motors, radar or anything else. In the case of a road bike, light is nice.

    I use the same bike for gravel too.

  42. #42
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    I really think there must be some room in the world for nice suspension bikes between the 1.5" tires and at best an inch of undamped frame compliance of a carbon gravel bike, and the 2.3in tires and 4in travel of an XC bike. But it seems like the only bikes that live there are sub-$1000 bikes like the suspension fork hybrids (Trek DS just for one brand example) and the $400 back-of-the-RV bikes. And there are a few, like that Niner, but it's not like there's a category. If it doesn't happen on gravel bikes, it probably won't happen.

    Suspension forks, or stems, on road bikes will keep coming back perennially forever, though

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
    I really think there must be some room in the world for nice suspension bikes between the 1.5" tires and at best an inch of undamped frame compliance of a carbon gravel bike, and the 2.3in tires and 4in travel of an XC bike. But it seems like the only bikes that live there are sub-$1000 bikes like the suspension fork hybrids (Trek DS just for one brand example) and the $400 back-of-the-RV bikes. And there are a few, like that Niner, but it's not like there's a category. If it doesn't happen on gravel bikes, it probably won't happen.

    Suspension forks, or stems, on road bikes will keep coming back perennially forever, though
    On the cannon dale Slate, wasnít it 35 front suspension.

    On the contrary, the limited travel gross bikes are in the higher end. The standard slate even came with a rigid lefty in the lower end models at REI. Lol.

    The BMC and Trek both make hardtail frames with compliance. They are carbon of course. BMC is in the seat stay and trek of course letís the seat tune flex backwards in the pro cal.

    The most likely likely solution is carbon because of what people can do with flex stays. Even my 2013 XTC has a tiny bit of this although they donít advertise it.


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    I wasn't thinking of the Slate specifically. I was thinking of the Specialized suspension stem, and this thing

    Edgy dudes and women on Full Suspension Road bikes-2150878607_65085f759e_o.jpg

  45. #45
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    I had now idea suspension on a road bike was a thing at all, besides variations in frame compliance. of all the things you can learn on MTBR! Interesting stuff, but no o e has addressed the most serious question.

    If there is suspension on my road bike, is spandex still required? Inquiring minds want to know...

  46. #46
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    [QUOTE=Darth Lefty;14997575]I really think there must be some room in the world for nice suspension bikes between the 1.5" tires and at best an inch of undamped frame compliance of a carbon gravel bike, and the 2.3in tires and 4in travel of an XC bike. But it seems like the only bikes that live there are sub-$1000 bikes like the suspension fork hybrids (Trek DS just for one brand example) and the $400 back-of-the-RV bikes. And there are a few, like that Niner, but it's not like there's a category. If it doesn't happen on gravel bikes, it probably won't happen.

    Suspension forks, or stems, on road bikes will keep coming back perennially forever, though[/QUOTE]

    Lol. I still have an Alsop suspension stem somewheres in my garage.
    Just call me Ray

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
    I wasn't thinking of the Slate specifically. I was thinking of the Specialized suspension stem, and this thing

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Isnít specialized still using the springy stem spacer on the stack. I kinda like it tolling around in the shop, but havenít tried to stand and climb on it. Iím used to riding a MTB on the street with open suspension, so I am sure I wouldnít care.


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