Easy to change Pedals? Bulls%#@- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Austin, Texas
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    Easy to change Pedals? Bulls%#@

    I've only tried to change pedals once before, and toiled in the 100 degree sun making myself so mad I wanted to take a sledgehammer to the whole bike. I ended up taking thema to a shop. I'm going to try some other pedals, but hopefully change occassionally to a bit more of what the terrain calls for.

    Just go take'em off and put your new ones on...all my friends say. Take you 15 minutes. So...I spray WD40 and wait about 5 minutes. Have the 15mm wrench and 6mm allen for whichever it is. These are Time pedals. It is supposed to be one or the other right? Well these definitely have the hex ends, but also the flats for a 15mm wrench. Try to turn the right pedal ccw. Try it with the allen, and then regular wrench. Try both ways. Use a hammer. Eventually use a rubber mallet that just about breaks my wife's arm. Hasn't budged a mmm. I wonder if a 12ga shotgun will do the trick?

  2. #2
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    Sounds like you need to learn how to remove/install pedals.
    :wq

  3. #3
    S&G CREW
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    Well make sure your going the right way, but they can be difficult to take off. Take a long piece of metal tubing, big cresent wrench or whatever you can get more leverage with and try it then leverage is your friend.

  4. #4
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    How is hitting your wife in the arm with a rubber mallet supposed to help get your pedals off?



    J/K


    They can be a little stubborn sometimes, especially since a lot of people overtighten them.

    If I don't have a long 6 or full size pedal wrench, the easiest and safest way I've found is to position the wrench so it's within 20-30 degrees of the crank(crank at 12, wrench at 2), and squeeze them together. This drastically reduces the chance of you ending up with a chainring embedded in your knuckles, and eliminates the chance of you hitting onlookers with hammers...

  5. #5
    DynoDon
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    Now if you have a breaker bar and allen that fits it you may get it off, the problem whoever put them on didnt' put grease or anti-seize on them, or they would come off with easy, get the longest wrench you can, or a pipe on the allen, or use a box end wrench on the end of the allen.
    When you put it back together use grease or preferably anti-seize,,,, good luck

  6. #6
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    what did you do with the mallet? just seat the wrench and give it a whack

  7. #7
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    I'm the resident breaker where I work, since I outweigh everybody there by 80 or more lbs. I use this:



    Bike on floor next to bench, pedal at 4 o'clock (right), wrench seated pointing left, ass on bench, left foot on wrench, right foot on pedal, stand up. Not pretty but it works.
    Worked at Trek/Fisher dealer 2008-2013. Only a little biased.

  8. #8
    Austin, Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by blunderbuss
    I'm the resident breaker where I work, since I outweigh everybody there by 80 or more lbs. I use this:



    Bike on floor next to bench, pedal at 4 o'clock (right), wrench seated pointing left, ass on bench, left foot on wrench, right foot on pedal, stand up. Not pretty but it works.

    LOL. OK, I'm keeping that one, cause I'm sure I will need it in the future. Got them off. I was definitely turning in the correct direction. Started using a rubber mallet because the hammer was beating the wrench silly. The wife tried all she could to help. Well...somewhere while looking through all sorts of info, someone said spray bicycle Chain Wax Lube on it, as opposed to WD40. I did, and a few minutes later I tried the left pedal, and with a few whacks it loosened and I just screwed it on off. Started to work on the right pedal again: several whacks and nothing, then just put my weight on it and gave it hard, steady pressure and all of a sudden it came loose. I'm a big guy, but I maybe it was the chain lube that helped, I don't know.

    Anyway, thanks to those with helpful hints and suggestions. I am putting an axle grease on the threads so hopefully this won't be much of a problem for the next time.

    David

  9. #9
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    I'm probably stating the obvious, but when you put new ones on don't tighten them up much. They'll stay in place just fine without being cranked down super tight. That way when you remove them again it won't be so tough.

    Just my 2 cents, having been through that before.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtOnTheBrain
    I'm probably stating the obvious, but when you put new ones on don't tighten them up much. They'll stay in place just fine without being cranked down super tight. That way when you remove them again it won't be so tough.

    Just my 2 cents, having been through that before.
    And put grease or the correct anti seize on the pedal spindle before screwing pedal into the crank arm.

    Remove and reinstal pedals at least yearly. I do mine every 6 months or so.
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  11. #11
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    I only hand tighten the pedal there's no need for any allen or pedal wrench for installation, I only use tool to take it off but it's not that hard. I used to tighten them so hard it only make them even harder to remove.

  12. #12
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    Yep, I just tightened until snug on both sides, and used some axle grease around the threads. That is a good idea to pull off your pedals every six months or so whether you need to or not. Thanks so much for the help folks. Sometimes those things can make you blow a gasket! Very much appreciated.

  13. #13
    Jason
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    WD40 is virtually useless as a penetrating oil. I use either PB Blaster or Deep Creep. They make a world of difference. WD40 has it's uses, just no on a bike.
    Jason
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  14. #14
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    I switch my pedals between my bikes because I'm too cheap to get a second set of pedals. So the constant installation definitely helps keep the threads loose. It's also a lot easier to break the threads on both pedals before you remove either of them completely. That way you can still easily brace the cranks so they don't move while you're taking off the opposite pedal, and then remove the pedals when you're done with that.
    Sometimes, I question the value of my content.

  15. #15
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    If your ever in need of a breaker bar look around for a mag light. Take off the battery cover, remove batteries, and presto you have a short breaker bar. Been using my 3d mag as an extension for years on both the car and bikes.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by sean salach
    How is hitting your wife in the arm with a rubber mallet supposed to help get your pedals off?
    Whoa!! Hold on there "Mr. Informed"! If you are trying to imply that there is ANYTHING that a Rubber Mallet cannot fix or at the very least improve I think you need to prove it or shut it.

    I find it incredibly irresponsible to be spreading lies and falsehoods like that without scientifically reproducible results. Until then the Rubber Mallet will reign supreme as the go to tool for all jobs. Especially jobs concerning the spouse.

    smokehouse4444, you need to swing it HARDER.

  17. #17
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    ^^^ Spouse, maby. Threaded parts, NEVER. All pedals are threaded so that pedaling foreward will tighten them, that's why a left pedal has left hand threads. Grease/anti-seize the threads and snug tight. Unless you are removing a pressed in headset race, put down the hammer! Or go ahead and destroy your bike with it.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by dexetr30
    WD40 is virtually useless as a penetrating oil. I use either PB Blaster or Deep Creep. They make a world of difference. WD40 has it's uses, just no on a bike.
    WD40 is great at removing the sticky left behind when you peel off stickers.
    Worked at Trek/Fisher dealer 2008-2013. Only a little biased.

  19. #19
    Jason
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    Quote Originally Posted by blunderbuss
    WD40 is great at removing the sticky left behind when you peel off stickers.
    True. My bad.
    Jason
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoorBehavior
    Whoa!! Hold on there "Mr. Informed"! If you are trying to imply that there is ANYTHING that a Rubber Mallet cannot fix or at the very least improve I think you need to prove it or shut it.

    I find it incredibly irresponsible to be spreading lies and falsehoods like that without scientifically reproducible results. Until then the Rubber Mallet will reign supreme as the go to tool for all jobs. Especially jobs concerning the spouse.

    smokehouse4444, you need to swing it HARDER.

    You are indeed correct, kind sir.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by blunderbuss
    WD40 is great at removing the sticky left behind when you peel off stickers.
    And pinstripes on a new car, yuck...

    Both pedals are removed by turning the wrench towards the rear of the bike.
    And use liquid wrench or some anti seize on the threads when installing new pedals for future removal.

  22. #22
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    I've never smashed my funny bone harder than that one time that one pedal suddenly came loose.

    Right into the front of my seat

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by chameleoneel
    I've never smashed my funny bone harder than that one time that one pedal suddenly came loose.

    Right into the front of my seat
    And never poked a bigger hole in my knuckles than when removing pedals. It's completely painless though, at least that's good.
    Sometimes, I question the value of my content.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by curtboroff
    ^^^ Spouse, maby. Threaded parts, NEVER. All pedals are threaded so that pedaling foreward will tighten them, that's why a left pedal has left hand threads. Grease/anti-seize the threads and snug tight. Unless you are removing a pressed in headset race, put down the hammer! Or go ahead and destroy your bike with it.
    I thought it was the opposite. When you pedal the right side clockwise, drag in the pedal bearing wants to turn the threads CCW, which loosens the pedal. Seems backwards to me.
    Matt

  25. #25
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    Time pedals can be a pain to remove, when I worked in a bike shop there were a few times when we had to remove the crank arms, clamp it in a vice and use a wrench with a big cheater to bar to break them loose. Other times they just come off without even trying using a dinky little 6mm allen wrench.

    Anyway, here's what I do to keep my Time pedals from seizing. Grease the threads in the crank, then wrap a few layers of Teflon tape around the threads on the pedals. Screw them in and tighten them down firmly. The grease & Teflon tape helps prevent galling, fretting, and corrosion, in short, the pedals come off a lot easier in the future.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by aerius
    Time pedals can be a pain to remove, when I worked in a bike shop there were a few times when we had to remove the crank arms, clamp it in a vice and use a wrench with a big cheater to bar to break them loose. Other times they just come off without even trying using a dinky little 6mm allen wrench.

    Anyway, here's what I do to keep my Time pedals from seizing. Grease the threads in the crank, then wrap a few layers of Teflon tape around the threads on the pedals. Screw them in and tighten them down firmly. The grease & Teflon tape helps prevent galling, fretting, and corrosion, in short, the pedals come off a lot easier in the future.
    Same procedure for Eggbeaters/Crank Bros?
    Last edited by Bro; 04-26-2011 at 10:30 PM.
    Sometimes, I question the value of my content.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by m85476585
    I thought it was the opposite. When you pedal the right side clockwise, drag in the pedal bearing wants to turn the threads CCW, which loosens the pedal. Seems backwards to me.
    You made me 2nd guess myself, so I checked. You're right, with forward rotation they most certainly do loosen, WTF.
    I've been engineering, building and repairing industrial machines for 15 years and this is opposite of any logic I've gained or have been taught. Rotational parts should always be designed to work tighten, not work loosen. Sorry for the bs reply, and thanks for checking me on it.
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by erik1245
    Same procedure for Eggbeaters/Crank Bros?
    Actually the procedure to prevent seizing for Crank Bros. pedals is a bit different: don't install them in the first place.

  29. #29
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    hahaha

    Quote Originally Posted by aerius
    Actually the procedure to prevent seizing for Crank Bros. pedals is a bit different: don't install them in the first place.
    Sounds like a solid strategy...

  30. #30
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    I had to use a large wrench giving me enough leverage to unlock the OEM bike pedals. Talk about over torquing it. I think a gorilla must've assemble the pedals in the factory. Can't imagine how overly tigthten other nuts are on the bike.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by mimi1885
    I only hand tighten the pedal there's no need for any allen or pedal wrench for installation, I only use tool to take it off but it's not that hard. I used to tighten them so hard it only make them even harder to remove.
    +1
    I use a little grease and hand tighten only... never had a pedal come loose in 30 years.

  32. #32
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    Wear gloves and make sure the chain is on the largest of the chain rings. From experience, it'll save your knuckles much pain if the wrench slips off.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by aerius
    Actually the procedure to prevent seizing for Crank Bros. pedals is a bit different: don't install them in the first place.
    Well.... My SPDs broke and the Eggbeaters were cheaper and lighter than my old SPDs. And I like my Eggbeaters just fine. So you.
    Sometimes, I question the value of my content.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by erik1245
    Well.... My SPDs broke and the Eggbeaters were cheaper and lighter than my old SPDs. And I like my Eggbeaters just fine. So you.

    Bananas are cheaper and lighter than SPD's too, but I wouldn't go using one as a pedal.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trail6
    Wear gloves and make sure the chain is on the largest of the chain rings. From experience, it'll save your knuckles much pain if the wrench slips off.
    with anything that resembles proper technique (as discussed earlier in this thread) you won't bust your knuckles. now removing chain ring bolts? be careful. holy hell can that get scary. more companies need to put hex wrenches on both sides of those things instead of that weird flat but non-screwdriver side
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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by curtboroff
    You made me 2nd guess myself, so I checked. You're right, with forward rotation they most certainly do loosen, WTF.
    I've been engineering, building and repairing industrial machines for 15 years and this is opposite of any logic I've gained or have been taught. Rotational parts should always be designed to work tighten, not work loosen. Sorry for the bs reply, and thanks for checking me on it.
    I had to look it up.

    http://www.bikeforums.net/archive/index.php/t-580362.html

    From Sheldon's web site:

    Pedal Threading

    Direction

    The right pedal has a normal thread, but the left pedal has a left (reverse) thread. The reason for this is not obvious: The force from bearing (http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gloss_ba-n.html#bearing) friction would, in fact, tend to unscrew pedals threaded in this manner. The fact is, however, that it is not the bearing friction that makes pedals unscrew themselves, but a phenomenon called "precession".
    You can demonstrate this to yourself by performing a simple experiment. Hold a pencil loosely in one fist, and move the end of it in a circle. You will see that the pencil, as it rubs against the inside of your fist, rotates in the opposite direction.
    Ignorant people outside the bike industry sometimes make the astonishing discovery that the way it has been done for 100 years is "wrong." "Look at these fools, they go to the trouble of using a left thread on one pedal, then the bozos go and put the left thread on the wrong side! Shows that bicycle designers have no idea what they are doing..."
    Another popular theory of armchair engineers is that the threads are done this way so that, if the pedal bearing locks up, the pedal will unscrew itself instead of breaking the rider's ankle.
    The left threaded left pedal was not the result of armchair theorizing, it was a solution to a real problem: people's left pedals kept unscrewing! I have read that this was invented by the Wright brothers (http://hawaii.cogsci.uiuc.edu/invent.../Wrights.html), but I am not sure of this.
    Note! The precession effect doesn't substitute for screwing your pedals in good and tight. It is very important to do so. The threads (like virtually all threads on a bicycle) should be lubricated with grease, or at least with oil.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by sean salach
    Bananas are cheaper and lighter than SPD's too, but I wouldn't go using one as a pedal.
    Well duh, bananas don't have the correct threading to fit into the crankarms.
    Sometimes, I question the value of my content.

  38. #38
    death to all humans
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    If I am doing the work in a garage or basement, I put one side of the bike/crank against a lolly column, and that keeps the crank from turning. I swap pedals on the other side, move the bike so that side of the crank is supported, and repeat on the other side. Keeps the bike stable and I don't slam my fist into the chainring.... Hard to make that sound smooth, but it works. A tree works too!

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