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  1. #1
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    Dropper post / work stand clamping.

    Anybody here ever damage their dropper via the work stand clamp? Or know of someone who did? I always cringe clamping it. I also feel the bike has a lot of pressure if the bike is left in the stand for any length of time.
    Last edited by DIRTJUNKIE; 10-17-2020 at 07:38 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    LOL. I was wondering the same thing. I just watched this today and it put me at ease. Worth the watch if you are wondering.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ix_e6LWvap0

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    This is a silly old superstition. Keep the jaws on your stand clean and don't crank it down unreasonably tight and your dropper post will be fine.

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    Just make sure it's fully extended, no issue with it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PNW MTB View Post
    LOL. I was wondering the same thing. I just watched this today and it put me at ease. Worth the watch if you are wondering.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ix_e6LWvap0
    lol
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    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  6. #6
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    I clamp mine the ugly way where all the weight of the bike is leveraging against the post

    If it can hold me up, it better hold the 28lb bike up!

  7. #7
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    I feel like the red of your stand is clashing with the red of your Primer frame.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TylerVernon View Post
    I feel like the red of your stand is clashing with the red of your Primer frame.
    I like red.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    I'm more disturbed by the fact that the drive side isn't facing out.

    So long as the dropper is all the way up, and the clamp jaws are clean, you won't hurt it. If you're concerned about scratching it from dirt on the jaws, throw a microfiber cloth in there before you clamp.
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    I'm more disturbed by the fact that the drive side isn't facing out.

    So long as the dropper is all the way up, and the clamp jaws are clean, you won't hurt it. If you're concerned about scratching it from dirt on the jaws, throw a microfiber cloth in there before you clamp.
    Thatís because Iím not working solely on the drive side. Invisaframe / frame protection kit in the works.

    I just thought Iíd throw a thread out about this seeing how it seems to be a concern.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    This is a silly old superstition. Keep the jaws on your stand clean and don't crank it down unreasonably tight and your dropper post will be fine.
    I don't think it's a superstition. Thomson says not to do it in their manual. That was my first dropper post, so I just follow along for my other droppers.

    I do agree that scratching the stanchion is the bigger risk, but my stand is also pushing 30yrs old (lord knows what kind of grit is embedded in the jaws at this point). I just clamp the jaws around collar of the dropper. Doesn't stop the stand from touching the stanchion, but most of the pressure/stress is on a stronger part of the post.

  12. #12
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    if you're paranoid about it, wrap a clean rag around your post before you clamp it. companies like Thomson have the most incredibly specific instructions about stuff like this because they don't want to be held responsible for people who clamp their post into a stand with an unreasonable amount of force with a filthy work stand and then spin the bike around in the stand like an idiot. fair enough, but you can use your brain and take reasonable precautions and your seatpost won't die.

    there's not enough space to clamp my bike in a stand anywhere else. there's not enough seatpost below the collar to get a solid grip on the bike and not enough space on the seat tube. there are cables and water bottle cages inside my frame everywhere else. the exposed part of the dropper, when used with a clean clamp, is 100% just fine. use your common sense and don't make a mountain out of a mole hill.

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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    I clamp mine the ugly way where all the weight of the bike is leveraging against the post

    If it can hold me up, it better hold the 28lb bike up!
    Just want to say up front it's your bike so do what you want.

    As to your statement, I would like to point out that the bike dropper was designed to support your weight. Putting the bike in work stand by clamping the stanchion is applying force in the opposite direction, and probably at an offset at that for which it is not designed for which is why dropper post literature typically warns not to do this.

    Again, its your bike so do what you want.
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    So long as the dropper is all the way up, and the clamp jaws are clean, you won't hurt it.


    Ive seen people damage droppers (ruin the bleed on old reverbs) by pulling up on a lowered post by the saddle. Never seen that happen on a Fox, but I still wouldn't pull up on a lowered post
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    My god guys, itís a mountain bike ó abuse it like one. Iíve been clamping my bikes like this for years. {gasp}
    Dropper post / work stand clamping.-b0a1f914-ba67-44a3-9df9-3a1ea281e04c.jpeg
    Dropper post / work stand clamping.-3a08dd1e-e0ba-4d90-ae33-2a9503bb5ddb.jpeg
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  16. #16
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    ^ Thatís an allow frame, Iíd be a bit more concerned clamping on the tube of a carbon frame.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    ^ Thatís an allow frame, Iíd be a bit more concerned clamping on the tube of a carbon frame.
    Well then the problem is clear ó you purchased a frame made of the wrong material.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    Well then the problem is clear ó you purchased a frame made of the wrong material.
    =sParty
    I was waiting for that.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    I was waiting for that.
    For carbon you just have to clamp it down until you hear a crunching sound, then back off teh clamp about 1/8 turn
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  20. #20
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    I'm in the keep your stuff clean and don't be stupid camp as well. I've had a number of droppers in my workstand and never had an issue.
    The member formerly known as Redtires....

  21. #21
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    Please don't clamp your frame. Ever.

    What's cheaper and easier to replace, a dropper post or a frame???
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    Please don't clamp your frame. Ever.

    What's cheaper and easier to replace, a dropper post or a frame???
    Given what's available today and the money involved...that may not be a straightforward question.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Handlebar View Post
    Given what's available today and the money involved...that may not be a straightforward question.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    Please don't clamp my frame. Ever.
    FIFY.
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    EDIT: *OneSpeed*, I should mention that you have mad cred with me here on MTBR. I respect your input, always. I donít intend to sound flip. If youíre not comfortable clamping your frame, donít do it. Personally Iím okay with it.
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    Please don't clamp your frame. Ever.

    What's cheaper and easier to replace, a dropper post or a frame???
    Um if your frame cant handle a clamp, you need a different bike.

    I clamp mine to my frame all the time, much easier on a home stand because it's not insanely off balance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tigris99 View Post
    Um if your frame cant handle a clamp, you need a different bike.
    Juvenile, but still a quality blanket statement.

    I clamp mine to my frame all the time, much easier on a home stand because it's not insanely off balance.
    Hmm, potentially damage the frame or buy a better bike stand? Which is more expensive?

    People who clamp the top tube in the center of the tube deserve what they get. Most often that's a butted tube and you're clamping, hands down, the weakest part of the frame.

    Carbon should never be clamped IMO unless you're literally just putting it in there hard enough to keep it from falling out. But if there's a seatpost available for clamping, why would anyone opt for putting the frame at risk?

    It's never a good idea to clamp a frame on a regular basis. Yes, on the right frame it's not a problem, but it's been well documented what happens when you clamp a frame that's not up to the task.

    Why teach the internet bad habits? Stick to best practice, clearly the seatpost is the best choice.
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  27. #27
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    While I have clamped my bike by the dropper justa few times, I think in most cases it should be fine. As shown in the photo, the weight is being pulled down directly.
    If clamping by the dropper and trying to maintain a level bike I see there could be concerns. Or maybe clamp right above the collar to reduce any excess binding at that junction.
    I always clamp around the collar though.

  28. #28
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    Since some dropper mfg's state not to clamp, other don't, I just keep it simple and clamp the frame nowadays. Realistically, though, if the post is fully extended AND the bike is hanging neutrally (balanced), post clamping should be OK. The main reason I clamp the frame is I rotate the bike on the stand for stuff like fork work, etc. Yeah, the post is designed to hold your weight, but not at near perpendicular angles!

    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Anybody here ever damage their dropper via the work stand clamp?
    Yes. Wouldn't stay locked anymore. Apparently an internal mechanical issue, not seal or scratch related.
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  29. #29
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    I've always been paranoid about this and I think I have that same stand. I guess i have to agree that if it can support my fat arse, it should be fin supporting the bike.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Pretty slick unit. Problem is, you take a $200 - $300 stand and then add another $200 to it with that clamp.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Thatís a nifty doo dad indeed.
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    Juvenile, but still a quality blanket statement.



    Hmm, potentially damage the frame or buy a better bike stand? Which is more expensive?

    People who clamp the top tube in the center of the tube deserve what they get. Most often that's a butted tube and you're clamping, hands down, the weakest part of the frame.

    Carbon should never be clamped IMO unless you're literally just putting it in there hard enough to keep it from falling out. But if there's a seatpost available for clamping, why would anyone opt for putting the frame at risk?

    It's never a good idea to clamp a frame on a regular basis. Yes, on the right frame it's not a problem, but it's been well documented what happens when you clamp a frame that's not up to the task.

    Why teach the internet bad habits? Stick to best practice, clearly the seatpost is the best choice.
    If you're clamping any tighter than just keeping it from moving that's on you. Thing is I can guarantee there isnt any facts to back up your opinion on this.

    A bike frame however, the stresses it has to endure, take some serious clamping force to cause any issues.

    Almost any bike is off balance when lifted by the seat post regardless of stand. Sorry but think you left common sense in the other room on that statement.

    Not sure what kind of back stand your afraid is going to compress the top tube, but that is purely in the dumb ass gets what they deserve relm because they'll damage a seat post just the same.

    Like you say cant clamp a carbon frame, well what about the countless carbon seat posts out there. ABSOLUTELY NO DIFFERENCE.

    Also, where are you supposed to clamp it when installing a dropper?? Try to do it on the ground? Especially on a bike that you need BB area access for internal routing??



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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Pretty slick unit. Problem is, you take a $200 - $300 stand and then add another $200 to it with that clamp.
    How many thousands did someone probably spend on the bike with a carbon tube that's a baaaad idea to clamp in the workstand, though?

    If I had a shop, I'd equip all my service stands with these, though.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigris99 View Post
    Like you say cant clamp a carbon frame, well what about the countless carbon seat posts out there. ABSOLUTELY NO DIFFERENCE.
    If there's one thing you should understand about carbon is that the layup can be customized to suit the needs of the part. A carbon seatpost is DESIGNED to accept clamping force. A carbon top tube is probably the weakest tube on the bike from that standpoint. It's simply not designed with clamping force in mind. Road frames, especially, can have top tubes flexible enough that you can make them flex just by pressing on them.

    But even the middle of the seat tube might not be strong enough to accept a work stand clamp that holds firmly enough to hold the bike stable.

    Some bikes can be clamped by the frame. Some cannot. There are a lot of unknowns and gray areas beyond that if you want to try to dig out more details. But what it comes down to are details about how the frame is built.

    It's a very expensive mistake to assume and clamp something that shouldn't be clamped in a workstand. A $200 Hirobel is cheap insurance when your frame could cost thousands to replace.

    Some of us prefer to be a bit more careful. Especially those who may have worked in shops with hard preventive policies in place (I count myself among that group).

    Both of the bikes I still own are steel and I'm not afraid to clamp the frames in the stand. Though my HT has a rectangular top tube that is unstable to clamp, so I don't.

  36. #36
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    I'm guilty of having the fear. It started with my Gravity Dropper 16 years ago. There's really nowhere to clamp on that post so I hang the bike from the nose of the saddle. That's carried over to my Revive post and even my single speed with a Thomson Masterpiece.
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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    How many thousands did someone probably spend on the bike with a carbon tube that's a baaaad idea to clamp in the workstand, though?

    If I had a shop, I'd equip all my service stands with these, though.
    I agree, totally worth it for a shop with liability factors involved. If I was a shop owner in todays high tech world with so many tube shapes thicknesses and materials, Iíd totally demand my mechanics use this spectacular device for clamping of all customer bikes.

    And for investment protection, totally worth it for a carbon framed bike owner or other fragile material bike materials such as thin walled butted aluminum 6061 tubing and others. Trust me Iíve been pondering since you posted it.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
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  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigris99 View Post
    If you're clamping any tighter than just keeping it from moving that's on you. Thing is I can guarantee there isnt any facts to back up your opinion on this.

    A bike frame however, the stresses it has to endure, take some serious clamping force to cause any issues.

    Almost any bike is off balance when lifted by the seat post regardless of stand. Sorry but think you left common sense in the other room on that statement.
    I didn't say anything about a bike being off balance in a stand?

    Not sure what kind of back stand your afraid is going to compress the top tube, but that is purely in the dumb ass gets what they deserve relm because they'll damage a seat post just the same.

    Like you say cant clamp a carbon frame, well what about the countless carbon seat posts out there. ABSOLUTELY NO DIFFERENCE.
    You're showing your ignorance. Why do you have such a strong opinion when you clearly have no idea what you're talking about?

    Yes, carbon seatposts are designed/engineered to take a clamping force from a work stand. No, a frame is NOT engineered or designed with this in mind.

    Also, where are you supposed to clamp it when installing a dropper?? Try to do it on the ground? Especially on a bike that you need BB area access for internal routing??
    Yes, you put the bike in a floor stand to install a dropper post.
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  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Millennial29erGuy View Post
    For carbon you just have to clamp it down until you hear a crunching sound, then back off teh clamp about 1/8 turn
    The redneck torque wrench clamping technique.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    If there's one thing you should understand about carbon is that the layup can be customized to suit the needs of the part. A carbon seatpost is DESIGNED to accept clamping force.

    I don't think so, but it does happen to be fine to clamp a CF seatpost to a bike stand. It's OK to clamp a dropper too.
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  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    Please don't clamp your frame. Ever.

    What's cheaper and easier to replace, a dropper post or a frame???
    So where are you supposed to clamp if there isn't enough seatpost to clamp on?
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  42. #42
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    Road bikes a completely different game there, no way debating not clamping the TT on those. Road bikes are fragile.

    I also understand there is concern with carbon frames and mistakes are pricey. They shouldnt be handled unless you know what your doing. But mtb frames if they are that fragile you cant grab the top tube in a stand (again with the brain power not to crank it) it's not going to hurt anything.

    I have seen frames up by the TT all the time in shops. But this ain't the kids doing it.

    My 2020 stumpjumper is a prime example there is no way on gods green earth your routing a dropper on the ground. Rear suspension has to be detached at the bottom to pull cover and such out. I know for a fact being I just did it a couple weeks ago.

    Another case in point, if holding by the TT is so back why are 95% of bike carriers out there holding by the TT. If they are so fragile you cant set it in the stand to hold it stable, sure cant be carrying them down the road for 1000s of miles purely holding the TT.

    I'm not saying it's wrong to avoid it. But speaking in absolutes is incorrect. It's a choice. But especially with aluminum or steel, it is fully incorrect to say it's wrong and never to do it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 93EXCivic View Post
    So where are you supposed to clamp if there isn't enough seatpost to clamp on?
    Oops. Time to buy a smaller frame.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    Oops. Time to buy a smaller frame.
    =sParty
    I mean on bikes like a BMX or DJ or trails bike. Most of people run the seats slammed. My BMX doesn't even have a fist length of seatpost in it.

    All my frames are steel so I'll just keep clamping to frame for my BMX and mtb.
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  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    The redneck torque wrench clamping technique.
    DJ you have stumbled on one of hte great mtb debates of the 2010s. Whether or not to clamp "thine almighty dropper poste".

    Another great topic is whether or not to mix sealant brands in the same tire
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    Oops. Time to buy a smaller frame.
    =sParty
    Or buy a dummy seat post intended to be used only for clamping.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Millennial29erGuy View Post
    DJ you have stumbled on one of hte great mtb debates of the 2010s. Whether or not to clamp "thine almighty dropper poste".

    Another great topic is whether or not to mix sealant brands in the same tire
    DJ had me a Ďredneck torque wrench.í

    Which, coincidentally, would be a great name for a band.
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    P.S. Thereís a thread for that.
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  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigris99 View Post
    Road bikes a completely different game there, no way debating not clamping the TT on those. Road bikes are fragile.

    I also understand there is concern with carbon frames and mistakes are pricey. They shouldnt be handled unless you know what your doing. But mtb frames if they are that fragile you cant grab the top tube in a stand (again with the brain power not to crank it) it's not going to hurt anything.

    I have seen frames up by the TT all the time in shops. But this ain't the kids doing it.

    My 2020 stumpjumper is a prime example there is no way on gods green earth your routing a dropper on the ground. Rear suspension has to be detached at the bottom to pull cover and such out. I know for a fact being I just did it a couple weeks ago.

    Another case in point, if holding by the TT is so back why are 95% of bike carriers out there holding by the TT. If they are so fragile you cant set it in the stand to hold it stable, sure cant be carrying them down the road for 1000s of miles purely holding the TT.

    I'm not saying it's wrong to avoid it. But speaking in absolutes is incorrect. It's a choice. But especially with aluminum or steel, it is fully incorrect to say it's wrong and never to do it.

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    Yes, bike racks that hold bikes by the top tube are not good for high end bikes. There's a lot of reasons for it. But it's worth pointing out that those racks don't CLAMP around the tube. They use rubber straps and the weight of the bike rests downward on them. Very similarly to the Hirobel adapter I posted. Further, one of the arms is almost always at the junction between the TT and ST. On carbon bikes, tube junctions are often much stronger than the middle of tubes. This is true on high end metal frames with butted tubes, too.

    It also matters what clamp your workstand has. Workstand clamps were redesigned some time ago. Certain designs were found to make it too easy to crush lightweight bikes/parts. Incidentally, the ancient clamp on my workstand is one of those old designs you don't find anymore. It's not possible for me to adjust the clamp pressure. There's a lot of those still out there, because workstands are one of those things that are pretty durable.

    People who take care absolutely use a dummy seatpost for bare frames. I have one I have used for the purpose. It's also a spare post in the event my dropper is down for service.

    Addressing this in absolutes (no, I don't clamp dropper stanchions, and no, I don't clamp any frames other than steel ones - or even, no frames at all) minimizes the amount of analysis you have to do about whether to clamp something that's in a gray area, and the number of expensive mistakes from bad analysis. People with more experience are less likely to make those expensive mistakes than people with much less experience, but they're not immune to those mistakes. Systematic approaches and generalizations that err on the side of caution prevent those mistakes, though.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Millennial29erGuy View Post
    DJ you have stumbled on one of hte great mtb debates of the 2010s. Whether or not to clamp "thine almighty dropper poste".
    Letís not discard this so quickly. If you scan through this thread there seems to be plenty of debate on this very subject. At least weíve got something different to talk about other than a blanket question of ďwhat makes a bike corner betterĒ.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
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  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Letís not discard this so quickly. If you scan through this thread there seems to be plenty of debate on this very subject. At least weíve got something different to talk about other than a blanket question of ďwhat makes a bike corner betterĒ.
    It actually is a very logical question and logical debate. If I was newer I would be concerned about clamping to a dropper as well, damn things used to be insanely finicky and not all that reliable. Why I hated them till now. One up dropper changed my attitude towards them.

    Many of us did get off the topic however and became a debate about where is safe to clamp besides the post.

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  51. #51
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    I have clamped my frame many times with no ill effect. Being careful makes all the difference, but perhaps such nuances have about as much place on an internet discussion forum as masks at a covid party.

  52. #52
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    I clamp my dropper stanchion with no ill affects. I just make sure no smudge marks are left behind. I use a thick pvc tape in the jaws which is soft and adds lots of friction.

    I'm definitely in the camp of clamping a carbon frame is not a good idea. Sure maybe some are fine but not across the board, why risk it. The tubing on my XL Rallon is massive it simply wouldn't fit in any bike stand jaws. I get the imbalance part but with a little forethought and practice it's a non-issue.

    What might be cool is instead of the silca product Harold posted would simply be a seatpost with a 90į bend in it so you could safely clamp AND balance the bike. Most droppers are dead simple to disengage the cable and remove. It could come with a comprehensive shim kit to fit any seat tube diameter and reckon it'll still much cheaper than the silca solution.

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  53. #53
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    Iím a frame clamper. Even besides the dropper issue, it is more balanced and therefore is putting less stress on the area being clamped.

    IMO, the important thing is that whatever you are clamping needs to be totally consistent in cross section over the area being clamped, so that the clamping force is evenly distributed. All but one of the bikes Iíve owed are like this (most Al or steel with a round top tube). I imagine a lot of newer bikes with highly sculpted frames might not work out.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  54. #54
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    A conundrum really. Todayís carbon frames & Kashma coated droppers it puts things in a quandary.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    A conundrum really. Todayís carbon frames & Kashma coated droppers it puts things in a quandary.
    Not really. All good shops have bottom-bracket-type stands. Hirobel's are quite cheap, relatively speaking, as well.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by wschruba View Post
    Not really. All good shops have bottom-bracket-type stands. Hirobel's are quite cheap, relatively speaking, as well.
    Great device but Hirobel's are $185. Add that to an already $200 or $300 work stand and itís getting up there.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    A conundrum really. Todayís carbon frames & Kashma coated droppers it puts things in a quandary.
    Common, would you rather replace a $2k-$3k carbon frame or a $300 dropper?

    Pretty easy decision for me.

    You just throw a clean microfiber cloth in the clamp before you clamp the dropper and I promise you will never damage the coating.

    I've been clamping my droppers for years, never a scratch.
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  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    Common, would you rather replace a $2k-$3k carbon frame or a $300 dropper?

    Pretty easy decision for me.

    You just throw a clean microfiber cloth in the clamp before you clamp the dropper and I promise you will never damage the coating.

    I've been clamping my droppers for years, never a scratch.
    Yes which is what Iíve been doing and what others have been doing for years without issue. which is great for protecting the Kashma coating but what Iím also concerned about is the pressure it must put on the frame itself being supported in one spot like that. Which should be fine with aluminum or other alloy frames but for carbon it makes me cringe.

    Anybody know of a similar product like the Hirobel but cheaper?

    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Yes which is what Iíve been doing and what others have been doing for years without issue. which is great for protecting the Kashma coating but what Iím also concerned about is the pressure it must put on the frame itself being supported in one spot like that. Which should be fine with aluminum or other alloy frames but for carbon it makes me cringe.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ix_e6LWvap0

    The binder bolt and your own weight put a lot more pressure on it.
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  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ix_e6LWvap0

    The binder bolt and your own weight put a lot more pressure on it.
    Lol
    How many times is that going to get posted? Dudes are characters. Sorry, I donít care how much stock you put into these claims, I donít.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Anybody know of a similar product like the Hirobel but cheaper?
    I'm not aware of anything. Seems to me like an everyman's version at a lower price would be attainable if people would actually buy it.

  62. #62
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    I use PVC tape in my jaws when clamping my dropper. It's thick, kinda squishy, and offers a lot of extra "grab" without worry of scratching the dropper stanchion. I much prefer it over using a rag.

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  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Lol
    How many times is that going to get posted? Dudes are characters. Sorry, I donít care how much stock you put into these claims, I donít.


    Did that vid already get posted here? I guess I didn't see it. Funny that you'd put more stock into random strangers posting on the internet than master techs with tons of experience who tested different theories with actual science though.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Did that vid already get posted here? I guess I didn't see it. Funny that you'd put more stock into random strangers posting on the internet than master techs with tons of experience who tested different theories with actual science though.
    Who put any stock in any of what any of you ever said? Me? Not bloody likely Mr. < sarcasm, chill down a bit. I believe and trust some of what some of you say.

    And yes, that video has been posted at least three times in the two threads on this subject in the last two weeks.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Funny that you'd put more stock into random strangers posting on the internet than master techs with tons of experience who tested different theories with actual science though.
    Haha exactly!

  66. #66
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    Iím not aware of too many things. I know what I know if you know what I mean.
    =sParty

    EDIT: Oops, wrong thread.
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  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    Iím not aware of too many things. I know what I know if you know what I mean.
    =sParty

    EDIT: Oops, wrong thread.
    LOL-Hilarious!

    Edit: Great, now that song is stuck in my head.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Yes which is what Iíve been doing and what others have been doing for years without issue. which is great for protecting the Kashma coating but what Iím also concerned about is the pressure it must put on the frame itself being supported in one spot like that. Which should be fine with aluminum or other alloy frames but for carbon it makes me cringe.

    Anybody know of a similar product like the Hirobel but cheaper?

    It's a reasonably good tool, but part of the reason that Silca bought them (it used to be it's own company) is that their market was pretty much JUST shops. There, it's a no-brainer to have one.

    For someone who is set on doing it as cheaply as possible, I suppose a piece of 1x1 or a 1" dowel could be used, with a couple of holes drilled for the bike cradles from an old Thule or Sportrack hanging hitch rack.

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by wschruba View Post
    It's a reasonably good tool, but part of the reason that Silca bought them (it used to be it's own company) is that their market was pretty much JUST shops. There, it's a no-brainer to have one.

    For someone who is set on doing it as cheaply as possible, I suppose a piece of 1x1 or a 1" dowel could be used, with a couple of holes drilled for the bike cradles from an old Thule or Sportrack hanging hitch rack.
    I think a 4Ē diameter pvc pipe spit in half would do the trick. Maybe Iíll end up going the cheap route and come up with something.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by wschruba View Post
    For someone who is set on doing it as cheaply as possible, I suppose a piece of 1x1 or a 1" dowel could be used, with a couple of holes drilled for the bike cradles from an old Thule or Sportrack hanging hitch rack.
    This is along the lines of what I was thinking for a cheaper version. Though I was trying to figure out how to make the cradles adjustable with qr levers. But the idea of using cradles off a hanging hitch rack was part of it.

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    Iím not aware of too many things. I know what I know if you know what I mean.
    =sParty

    EDIT: Oops, wrong thread.
    Thankís.

    https://forums.mtbr.com/off-camber-o...l#post14967647
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Anything can post something that put me at ease?

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