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  1. #1
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    Does anyone here suffer from BPPV/Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo?

    If so, how do you deal with it? I was just diagnosed with it over the weekend and when it hits, it's incapacitating. I can't imagine having an episode in the middle of a ride....
    Here is a wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benign_...tional_vertigo

  2. #2
    since 4/10/2009
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    sounds pretty awful. I had an episode of vertigo once. I have no idea what brought it on...but thank goodness I was sitting down when it did. Whew...I had to hold on to the table just to stay sitting. I couldn't imagine it being a constant concern.

  3. #3
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    Yeah it sucks... It feels like Russian Roulette... I never know when it's going to hit... The worst part is that my episodes last for over 24 hours!

  4. #4
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    ouch. mine only lasted about a minute. any meds you can take to help?

  5. #5
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    the doc prescribed meclizine and valium... I'm hoping to see a vestibular therapist to see if there are any exercises I can do to keep it in check... I've researched it quite a bit and it seems there are maneuvers like the Epley that I can do to minimize the impact when it does hit...

  6. #6
    I always bleed like this.
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    It hit me, my wife made me go to see the doc and he gave me a printout with the Epley procedures. Mine went away in the first 48 hours and has not really returned. He said that the particle that is in the fluid in your ear often dissolves over time.
    Good Luck

  7. #7
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    As a physical therapist that has worked in vestibular rehab, I can tell you that seeing a therapist will USUALLY take care of the problem, very quickly. Essentially, the PT will put you through certain positions to encourage the "ear rocks" to return to where they belong. After the procedure, there are some position restrictions to minimize the chances of the "rocks" moving again.

    Of course, some people don't respond that quickly and easily, and at times what is thought to be BPPV turns out to be something different. The key is to see a PT who is versed in vestibular rehab to help you sort out what is going on.

    Also, have you seen an ENT (Ears, nose, throat doctor)? They are the docs who specialize in disorders such as this.

    Presuming you see a PT for treatment, be forwarned the treatment will ellicit your dizziness again. The therapist has to provoke the symptoms to know where the problem is and how to treat it.

    One other comment: be very cautious with the meds. Meclizine suppresses the vestibular system, which may make you feel better but actually puts you at risk for falling. The valium may make you more comfortable, but again the side effects for daily life can be incapacitating.

    Good luck with this.. I always enjoyed seeing patients with BPPV because of how quickly and easily it was fixed.

  8. #8
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    Thanks Chill,
    I don't like taking meds so I only took the valium and mezicline to get over the episode (we were on vacation in Maui at the time). I haven't seen an ENT yet but that will be the next step more than likely if my visit to the Vestibular PT doesn't help. I'm doing OK now but I still can't move my head very fast and there are times when I feel like I'm on a rocking boat (not the best feeling when you're riding). It's great to hear that it's a problem that is relatively easily resolved... I hope...


    Quote Originally Posted by chillmolly
    As a physical therapist that has worked in vestibular rehab, I can tell you that seeing a therapist will USUALLY take care of the problem, very quickly. Essentially, the PT will put you through certain positions to encourage the "ear rocks" to return to where they belong. After the procedure, there are some position restrictions to minimize the chances of the "rocks" moving again.

    Of course, some people don't respond that quickly and easily, and at times what is thought to be BPPV turns out to be something different. The key is to see a PT who is versed in vestibular rehab to help you sort out what is going on.

    Also, have you seen an ENT (Ears, nose, throat doctor)? They are the docs who specialize in disorders such as this.

    Presuming you see a PT for treatment, be forwarned the treatment will ellicit your dizziness again. The therapist has to provoke the symptoms to know where the problem is and how to treat it.

    One other comment: be very cautious with the meds. Meclizine suppresses the vestibular system, which may make you feel better but actually puts you at risk for falling. The valium may make you more comfortable, but again the side effects for daily life can be incapacitating.

    Good luck with this.. I always enjoyed seeing patients with BPPV because of how quickly and easily it was fixed.

  9. #9
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    I got it the 2d time I was in Bosnia. I really think it had something to do with the ultr-cold aircon in the "CHU's". That and I had just gotten out of a cast from a broken arm, said arm still being sore.

    Somehow I managed to wander over to "Blue Factory"--where the medical unit was. They did some etsts and said I had some sort of imbalance caused by particles in the fluid in the canal between the ars--or some such-can't remember exact details. They seemed to think it wasn't too abnormal.

    The episode of dizzies and imbalance, especially from getting up from an inclined position lasted seveal days to a week.

    This happened somewhere between 1997-1998. Thankfully I haven't had another bout.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by flipnidaho
    Thanks Chill,
    I don't like taking meds so I only took the valium and mezicline to get over the episode (we were on vacation in Maui at the time). I haven't seen an ENT yet but that will be the next step more than likely if my visit to the Vestibular PT doesn't help. I'm doing OK now but I still can't move my head very fast and there are times when I feel like I'm on a rocking boat (not the best feeling when you're riding). It's great to hear that it's a problem that is relatively easily resolved... I hope...
    Try to figure out what postions set you off, and what side the problem seems to be coming from. That will help your therapist/doctor. Also think about intensity ( 0 being nothing to 10 being vomiting) and how long that severity lasts.



    M

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by chillmolly
    Try to figure out what postions set you off, and what side the problem seems to be coming from. That will help your therapist/doctor. Also think about intensity ( 0 being nothing to 10 being vomiting) and how long that severity lasts.



    M

    The doc I saw said it was my right ear based on what position my eyes flickered during a "follow my finger test" and the fact that when I laid on my left ear, the room stabilizes. The intensity scale I would say close to a 10 (incapacitating to the point where I can't even get up from laying down on my left side without having to almost hurl)... The weird thing for me is that the episode lasts over 24 hours (maybe longer if I don't take meds). The typical BPPV case I read about only lasts 30 seconds to a few minutes so I think mine condition is a little odd/atypical...
    Last edited by flipnidaho; 01-30-2010 at 05:54 PM.

  12. #12
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    Yep, went thru it just recently, and it only took a few days on meclizine for mine to go away. Apparently, most episodes last for a week or two, then kinda resolve on their own. Mine would whip my butt when I sat up in bed in the morning, laid down at night, or leaned my head back if sitting on the couch or something like that. Was pretty fierce for about a week as I initially resisted taking the drugs, but after just a few days of meds, it went away. Interestingly enough, even during the worst of it, it NEVER had any effect on me when riding.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by scooter_dude
    Yep, went thru it just recently, and it only took a few days on meclizine for mine to go away. Apparently, most episodes last for a week or two, then kinda resolve on their own. Mine would whip my butt when I sat up in bed in the morning, laid down at night, or leaned my head back if sitting on the couch or something like that. Was pretty fierce for about a week as I initially resisted taking the drugs, but after just a few days of meds, it went away. Interestingly enough, even during the worst of it, it NEVER had any effect on me when riding.
    Funny you say that... The past few days, the only time I don't feel like I'm on a boat is when I'm riding...

  14. #14
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    Yes and mine also develops into full blown Meniere's. I have had disabling attacks at work, at the airport and even while sleeping. Been dealing with it for more than 12 years. Its comes and goes, some periods of remission have lasted close to a year.

    The good news is I have never had a really bad episode while riding, that includes mtb, road and motorcycles.

    Be wary of any ENT that wants to treat by surgery or injection to destroy the ear nerves on the affected side. It was recommended to me by the first ENT I saw.

    Meclizine is something I keep handy when my symptoms are present. I dont take it on a regular basis.

    Absolutely check out the Epiley maneuver or find a physical therapist that can help with that.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by 67fastback
    Yes and mine also develops into full blown Meniere's. I have had disabling attacks at work, at the airport and even while sleeping. Been dealing with it for more than 12 years. Its comes and goes, some periods of remission have lasted close to a year.

    The good news is I have never had a really bad episode while riding, that includes mtb, road and motorcycles.

    Be wary of any ENT that wants to treat by surgery or injection to destroy the ear nerves on the affected side. It was recommended to me by the first ENT I saw.

    Meclizine is something I keep handy when my symptoms are present. I dont take it on a regular basis.

    Absolutely check out the Epiley maneuver or find a physical therapist that can help with that.
    I did some research on Meniere when I was trying to self diagnose and it's scary... The worse part is the randomness. I also now keep Meclizine and Valium handy wherever I go (except for riding- maybe I should start carrying a pill box in my pack also). I agree with the surgery... It's the last possible option for me. The surgery looks pretty close to brain surgery, I'd rather take drugs and deal with it than have someone cut into my head...

  16. #16
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    Check this article: http://www.scielo.cl/pdf/ijmorphol/v23n2/art09.pdf

    Its a 2006 study by Luis Miguel Ramirez Aristeguieta, very interesting stuff and some outside the box thinking.

  17. #17
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    Disclaimer: I know nothing about this sort of thing, only sharing the experience of a family member.

    That said, my mother-in-law has had what, I think, is the very same sort of issue. She tried meds to no avail. My wife took her to the local healthy / hippie / homeopathic sort of store to see if a friend of ours there had any magic potion to recommend. She did not, but she told my mother-in-law to try acupuncture.

    So, long story short, she tried it, and it seems to have worked. YMMV, of course.

  18. #18
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    The first time I had vertigo I figured I was about to buy the farm! I had a cold which began to make me slightly dizzy a few times a day - figured it was sinuses. Finally a week later at work it hit me like a ton of bricks, I (stupidly) managed to drive myself home and proceeded to puke my guts out. Next day felt fine, went to doc and was diagnosed with labyrinthitis. I have had it twice since then, the last one being two weeks ago. I have noticed these spells are less worse each time, but I've never "passed" the BPPV test the docs do - always a diagnosis of labyrinthitis.

    I think the absolute worst part is thinking "ok here it comes, this is going to suck!" I try to keep myself calm and just lay in bed and watch movies if possible.

  19. #19
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    Newly diagnosed...out of nowhere, room started spinning so scared. Husband took me to hospital I was admitted and all tests point to MPPV. I had the eflee treatment in hospital, not fun and was sent home told me to follow up with ENT who just performed it again. Awful. I am really scared trying to sleep with head propped up but the slightest wrong move with my head and it starts again. I'm on steroids but cant imagine I now have to live like this.

  20. #20
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    I've lived with Menieres for all of my adult life (58 now)... Totally deaf in my left ear with a constant ringing. From my experience it's a change in barometric pressure that will trigger my drop attacks. Low does Diazapan daily and Meclazine as needed can control it when huge pressure gradiance can't be avoided. Turmeric to prevent inflammation is also helpful.

    No caffeine.

  21. #21
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    I had this issue for few days. My doctor prescribed antibiotics because I was infected with virus in inner ear canal. The meds worked great and recovered in few days.

  22. #22
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    You are lucky...

  23. #23
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    Sounds like what happened to a pilot I went through initial platform training with. He was flying on an early hop when he told his instructor that he could't see. Had to be talked to a landing.

    Obviously, he lost his wings. Very sucky.

  24. #24
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    Got it the first time (hopefully last?) in September. Not too fun. I didn't go to the doctor, they typically can't do much if it's the calcium crystals causing it every give you an over the counter anti nausea, anti inflammatory and the eplee maneuver.

    I was pretty off for about a week. Couldn't ride a bike safely for three weeks. I could ride do long as I looked where I was heading, but with a bum inner gyroscope the second I looked away I would go offline. All good now, no lasting issues.

    Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk

  25. #25
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    Tbi a few yrs ago. Knocked some crystals loose I guess. Epley Maneuver works for me when symptoms reappear.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BtT2PDJVXlk

  26. #26
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    I used to have the spins/nausea/vomiting many years ago and was diagnosed with Meniere's. Haven't had a serious episode for a couple years. I still drink one cup of coffee in the a.m. What really helped me (I believe) was cutting back on the salt- I'm very conscious of the sodium amounts on food labels now.

    This exercise from Dr. Carol Foster may help someone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p1NVrGkBTjs

  27. #27
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    I think this dead thread was resurrected by a bot.

  28. #28
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    Caution;  Merge;  Workers Ahead!

    HOLY SH*T. I have this! I never knew it had a name. My doc just said I had "crystals" in my ears--especially the left ear. I have very poor eustachian tubes and get inner ear infections a couple times a year (I am 40+yrs old). Since 2005, I've had tubes in my ears 3 times and ruptured my left ear drum twice. When I had the tubes, it was smooth going. Otherwise, I have vertigo a few times a month. Mostly waking in bed and occassionally while getting a chiro adjustment. In fact, I woke up with vertigo just THIS MORNING. Goes away usually within a few minutes..but it verily doth sucketh.

  29. #29
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    I've had it off/on for years. never really know what brings it on. Sometimes a bad cold and sinus/ear congestion, other times nothing.

    Epley maneuver puts the crystals back into the center of the ear, but you need to sleep upright or they'll find their way back into the tubes. Eventually they adhere, and at the same time your brain adjusts. BPPV exercises are meant to train the brain to react less intensely to the stimuli.

    IMO, meds only mask the symptoms (nausea). I prefer cannabis.

    I've ridden with it a week or two after it starts to subside. it wasn't fun for the first hour, but it settled in. Sometimes takes me 4 or 5 weeks to fully clear, even then I'll do something (like skiing a half-pipe) and still feel the effects.

    Good luck!
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