Do you stretch?- Mtbr.com

View Poll Results: Do you stretch?

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  • Yes, before and after every ride.

    15 21.74%
  • Yes, only before riding.

    19 27.54%
  • Yes, only for races.

    2 2.90%
  • Only if I can remember, every 3-50 rides.

    13 18.84%
  • No, stretching what's that?

    20 28.99%
Results 1 to 29 of 29

Thread: Do you stretch?

  1. #1
    I'm feeling dirty, you?
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    Do you stretch?

    Do you stretch?

  2. #2
    bonkin' clyde
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    very rarely

    Quote Originally Posted by jonowee
    Do you stretch?
    When I'm having this feeling of being tight as a guitar string, I'll go outside, run a little, do some extreme stretching, enduring the pain for about 15 seconds and then slowly straightening out. It helps a bit but the best thing for really loosening me up are 2-3 burnouts on my bike preceded by about a good 20 minutes of some good, slow stretching...no knee pops when I sit down, all fluid joints...
    My bed comforts my body. Sleep comforts my mind. The trail comforts my soul. And without a soul, what is a body anyway?

  3. #3
    Boj
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluronthetrails
    When I'm having this feeling of being tight as a guitar string, I'll go outside, run a little, do some extreme stretching, enduring the pain for about 15 seconds and then slowly straightening out. It helps a bit but the best thing for really loosening me up are 2-3 burnouts on my bike preceded by about a good 20 minutes of some good, slow stretching...no knee pops when I sit down, all fluid joints...
    Forcing a stretch to the point of pain is not good.

    I stretch after every workout, and before a race on the stratline.

  4. #4
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    Only after a ride

    Quote Originally Posted by Boj
    Forcing a stretch to the point of pain is not good.

    I stretch after every workout, and before a race on the stratline.
    Stretching cold, tight muscles feels like too much of a strain on them, instead i start my ride slowly for the first 5 -10 minutes before dropping the hammer. I stretch after the ride while my muscle are still warm and loose, I find it aids my recovery immensely.

  5. #5
    Trail rider and racer
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    When I am disciplined I will stretch after rides but at the moment I am lazy and haven't really bothered to do so.

    I feel better the day after if I stretch.

    I always stretch after a 8/12/24 hour race otherwise I'll suffer.
    Trev!

  6. #6
    Derailleurless
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonowee
    Do you stretch?
    Yes, religiously, but only after the ride while everything is gooey.

  7. #7
    www.derbyrims.com
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    Yes after warming up completely

    Quote Originally Posted by Speedüb Nate
    Yes, religiously, but only after the ride while everything is gooey.
    Sometimes I feel tight when riding and will stop after heating up fully to streatch (usually my low back).

    I've heard, and it sounds reasonable, that stretching is a method to get muscles and nerves to slide around amongst their tissues and it removes plaques that can build up (which turn into hardened spurs or tumors) and help move blood along after workouts.

    Some people don't exercise so stretching without warming up for them becomes a form of exorcise, which is better than no physical activity.

    - ray

  8. #8
    Jm.
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    what about only after as being an option?

  9. #9

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    stretching

    Quote Originally Posted by Jm.
    what about only after as being an option?
    After ride is the only time I stretch, sometimes not until the evening before bed. I agree with Ratt, ride leisurly pace for awhile to warm up, I don't stretch pre-ride. Never strech a cold muscle. I believe that only leads to potential of torn muscles and/or pulls, which you don't want...

    Find a prgram that works and stick with it.

  10. #10

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    I suppose I should. At least I usually warm up a bit by riding to or around the trailhead.

  11. #11
    suck it trebeK
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    Likewise, I suppose I should too. I usually forget, but I at least warm-up by taking it easy for the first little while.

    Also, you should never stretch cold muscles, you should always warm-up easily before you stretch.


    OT: Lighty_, I gotta say I love your avatar, I'm jealous lol

  12. #12

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    No good Stretching?

    Research indicates that stretching prior to exercise events increases the probability of injury to the joint(s) that the stretched muscle crosses. Accordingly, the best time to stretch is post-exercise, if at all. Most say that a good, slow warm-up is best. Damn-most of the best rides in my area have climbs right from the start!

  13. #13
    I already rode that
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonowee
    Do you stretch?
    Only when I take the bike off the roof rack
    Last time I did some stretching before the ride I got tried out early into the ride ( prob from the stretching! )
    I dont even warm up for racing. Just jump on the bike and go! Well after waiting at the starting line.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonowee
    Do you stretch?
    My wife and I were mid-post-ride stretch at the car yesterday. She was stretching out her quad with the ankle behind the back trick when this guy rides on his bike to the car parked next to ours. As he's breaking it down and putting it away in his trunk, he asks my wife, "Doesn't that hurt your back?" "Noooo...?" "Well *<i>I</i>* usually stretch that by putting my leg on a three-foot ledge and then leaning back," as he hopped into his car to drive away.

  15. #15
    Jm.
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    Quote Originally Posted by moun10bike
    Research indicates that stretching prior to exercise events increases the probability of injury to the joint(s) that the stretched muscle crosses.
    Yup, I've read that research. According to the findings, stretching is "out" as a pre-excersise activity can be bad for you. There's nothing wrong with "warming up" by getting your heartrate up and getting your blood vessles dialated, but just trying to stretch muscles and ligaments has recently been proven to be absolutely not beneficial. Stretching afterwards on the other hand is good, anything you can do to keep the muscles from tightening up and the lactic acid from pooling is a good idea.

  16. #16
    Just passing through....
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    I find it beneficial to warm up, stretch gently for about one minute each on the hamstrings and quads, then stretch more thoroughly after the ride. I find my quads don't burn out nearly as fast on the climbs with a some mild pre-stretching, so long as I warm up first. I've read the research as well, but this seems to work for me.
    If you want to play with electricity, more power to ya......

  17. #17
    Turner Homer
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaFireMedic
    I find it beneficial to warm up, stretch gently for about one minute each on the hamstrings and quads, then stretch more thoroughly after the ride. I find my quads don't burn out nearly as fast on the climbs with a some mild pre-stretching, so long as I warm up first. I've read the research as well, but this seems to work for me.
    same here

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by sstaurus
    OT: Lighty_, I gotta say I love your avatar, I'm jealous lol
    Thank you. I stole it.

    A lot of people don't realize it's animated.

    Research indicates that stretching prior to exercise events increases the probability of injury to the joint(s) that the stretched muscle crosses. Accordingly, the best time to stretch is post-exercise, if at all. Most say that a good, slow warm-up is best. Damn-most of the best rides in my area have climbs right from the start!
    How weird. Where was this published?

  19. #19
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    ?????????

    Quote Originally Posted by moun10bike
    Research indicates that stretching prior to exercise events increases the probability of injury to the joint(s) that the stretched muscle crosses. Accordingly, the best time to stretch is post-exercise, if at all. Most say that a good, slow warm-up is best. Damn-most of the best rides in my area have climbs right from the start!


    tell that to every high school, college, and pro sports team!!!
    That's a joke!

  20. #20
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    When I was playing softball, the only time I ever pulled muscles to the point it took me out of the game were the two times I forgot to stretch before the game. Both times sprinting to first base.

  21. #21
    Jm.
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    June 6, 2000 (Indianapolis) -- Stretching before exercise does not reduce the risk of injury, according to one sports medicine expert. But, he says, stretching at other times may be beneficial.


    Ian Shrier, MD, PhD, associate professor of sports medicine at McGill University in Montreal, says that the concept of stretching "immediately before exercise is something that has been accepted on theory, but when we examine it clinically, we can see that there is no science behind the principle."


    He tells WebMD that people who advocate stretching -- which is just about everyone in the sports medicine community -- do so because they are following the Zen statement, "That which is flexible will not break." That statement, he says, "works for trees and other objects that are taking perpendicular force. But, muscles are stretched end-to-end and when stretched to the maximum may tear."


    Shrier discussed his views on stretching here at a recent meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine. Last fall, he first questioned the value of stretching in an article in the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine. "Everyone criticized me, but recently a study from Sweden validated my claims," he says.


    He says that although he doesn't recommend stretching immediately before exercise, stretching does have a place in conditioning. "I think, for example, that it's a good idea to stretch in the morning when you get up and then go about your normal activities. I also think it's a good idea to stretch before going to bed at night," he says.


    Moreover, "patients who have stiffness, for example a frozen shoulder, have to stretch to increase range of motion," he says. One of the greatest benefits associated with stretching is increased range of motion. "In this regard, it is true that in some specific sports stretching is necessary. A gymnast needs to stretch out in the splits, for example. Another example is a hurdler who needs to stretch out the muscles to clear the hurdles."


    Shrier says that there are also some animal data suggesting that stretching may eventually increase muscle strength. In a strengthening program, "stretching might be prescribed on a daily basis, and after several months, it may increase muscle strength," he says.


    One of the little known benefits of stretching comes with "stretch tolerance, in which the stretching acts like an analgesic," says Shrier. Many sports medicine experts attending his lecture protested this notion, but during a heated discussion following the lecture, most agreed that stretching does increase tolerance to pain. "Initially a stretch is painful, but when repeated," he says, "one is not aware of the pain. That's what I call analgesia."


    Shrier says that some experts think stretching may enhance performance in some sports, but he remains skeptical. "It appears that sprinters who compete immediately after stretching (within 15 minutes, because in 30 minutes this effect is gone) may actually run faster because the muscle is more elastic and so it doesn't have to work as hard," he says. "Again, however, this is theory, and we need to see science."

  22. #22
    Jm.
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    also;

    Flexibility is the range of motion possible around a specific joint or series of articulations. Flexibility is specific to a given joint or movement. A person may not be able to function normally if a joint lacks normal movement. The ability to move a joint through an adequate range of movement is important for daily activities in general as well a sports performance. For example, a sprinter may be handicapped by tight, unelastic hamstring muscles since the ability to flex the hip joint will be limited, thus shortening stride length. Activities such as gymnastics, ballet, diving, karate, and yoga require improved flexibility or even the ability to hyperextend some joints for superior performance.

    On the other hand, most leisure or recreational activities require only normal amounts of flexibility. The idea that good flexibility is essential for successful performance is based on empirical rather than experimental evidence.

    Adequate range of movement may be more important for long term injury prevention. Individuals involved with physical activity who have poor flexibility (specific or general) risks exceeding the extensibility limits of the musculoskeletal unit. Once flexibility is assessed and flexibility insufficiency are identified, a stretching program can be customized, emphasizing those areas in need of improvement.

    Three basic types of stretch techniques include ballistic, static, and proprioceptive neuromuscular (PNF). The oldest technique is the ballistic stretch which makes use of repetitive bouncing movements. It has been virtually abandoned by almost all experts in the field due to safety concerns. The static technique remains a very effective, relatively safe, and popular method of stretching. It involves passively stretching a muscle to the point of mild discomfort by holding it in a maximal stretch for an extended period. Recommendations for the optimal holding time are varied, ranging from 10 seconds to 60 seconds. PNF techniques involve a partner actively stretching the participant by some combination of altering contraction and relaxation of both agonist and antagonist muscles. Some of the different PNF techniques used include slow reversal hold, contract relax, and hold relax. PNF stretching usually involves a 10 second push phase followed by a 10 second relaxation phase, typically repeated a few times. PNF stretching is capable of producing greater improvement in flexibility compared to other techniques. Its disadvantage is that it typically requires a partner, although stretching with a partner may have some motivational advantage for some individuals. Ninos J (2001) has proposed particular PNF stretches that can be perform by an individual when a partner is unavailable.

    Contrary to popular belief, stretching before a workout does not appear to decrease the occurrence of injury. The risk of injury seems to be about equal for those who stretch and those who do not stretch before exercise. The warm-up, not stretching, seems to be the important deterrent for injury, performed before an exercise bout. Stretching seems to offer more long term benefit such as maintaining functional flexibility and correcting particular muscular imbalances.

    Shrier's (1999) review of the literature found three articles that suggested stretching was beneficial included a cointervention of warm-up. One study found stretching was associated with less groin/buttock problems in cyclists, but only in women. Five studies suggesting no difference in injury rates between stretchers and non-stretchers and three suggesting stretching was detrimental. One reason stretching is thought to be ineffective in reducing the risk of injury is the fact that most muscle injuries occur when the muscle is eccentrically contracted within the normal range of motion (Shrier 1999). It seems more flexible individuals do not necessarily have less incidence of injury (Gleim 1997). In some cases those with greater flexibility may actually experience more injury, particularly if the excessive flexibility compromises joint integrity (Surberg 1983).

    Greater flexibility may impair performance in sports that that do not require a high degree of flexibility such as running. Runners with less flexibility are actually more efficient at running (Jones 2002). Static stretching may also reduce maximum force production. The loss of voluntary strength and muscular power may last up to one hour after the static stretch (Evetovich 2003, Young 2003). People who participate in activities that require more than average flexibility (eg: gymnasts, dancers, figure skaters) may still find stretching beneficial to their performance.

    Although stretching does not seem to offer many short term benefits when performed before exercise, stretching does seem to offer other long term benefits. Improved flexibility may help prevent back and other orthopedic problems. Individuals with certain muscular imbalances or postural problems can benefits from stretching. Stretching can help maintain flexibility which may otherwise decline with age or inactivity due to an injury. Stretching may be more safely performed after exercise, when muscles are warm. Unless an activity requires extreme flexibility, stretching before is probably unnecessary. And even then, stretches should be performed after a warmup.

  23. #23
    Jm.
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    so you can see, the biggest reason that people stretch before an exercise is not because of science, it's just something that society has accepted for so long that it is simply a tradition, but it is not bounded in science, and the percieved benefits of stretching before exercise are most definitely arguable...

  24. #24
    I'm feeling dirty, you?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jm.
    what about only after as being an option?
    If only I could change it, I forgot that option, bugger...

    Any moderators/administrators have the power to reset and modify the poll?

  25. #25
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    I do stretching, sit ups, powerbreathe etc each morning whether riding or not

    I do stretches before and after each cycling or weights session as well as another 2-3 times during the day normally.

    It's just part of the daily routine really.

  26. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by malariavalley
    tell that to every high school, college, and pro sports team!!!
    That's a joke!

    Yep, you are right. That is because Athletic Trainers are not exercise physiologists. The truth will eventually trickle down,

  27. #27
    bon vivant
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    I stretch every day, first thing, whether or not I'm riding that day.
    Keeps me from feeling like something's about to give way, the first hour of every day. Didn't vote, because I didn't see an appropriate entry for that.

  28. #28

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    On most rides, I try to start slowly and then stop about 5 mins into the ride and do a good stretch of my legs, arms, etc. for about a minute or 2. Then when the ride is over, I will stretch again, after the bike is put away and my breathing and heartrate are about normal again.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonowee
    Do you stretch?
    I don't, but some cyclist do.

    Colby Pearce of the USA Track Cycling team (Points Race).
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