Danny Macaskill technical questions: wheels and body soreness- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Danny Macaskill technical questions: wheels and body soreness

    Peoples,

    After seeing Danny Macaskill's latest video, I have two technical questions.

    1. I'm curious as to how he doesn't pinch flat or destroy his rear wheel. Does anyone know the specifics of his setup? Specifically: tire pressure, and all the particulars of the equipment (tire, innertube, rim, spokes, and so on). Also, how much does Danny weigh?

    2. When I see the frequency/intensity of the drops and jumps he takes, I'm curious as to how he deals with body soreness. For myself, when I do particularly aggressive riding, I get a very sore neck and traps from all the snapping of the head. I know that this is something you can get used to, and I also know Ryan Leech does yoga to deal with his bodily stresses, but I'm curious to hear what you all have to say about dealing with these repetitive stresses and perhaps increasing your tolerances.

    Thanks for any objective info.

  2. #2
    Mountain Man Dan
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    I think I heard he uses helium in his tires..............
    The bike is nothing more then circles turning circles, It's the human motor that makes it elegant.

  3. #3
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  4. #4
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    I want that orange bike he used for his last video. Must be freakin' sweet to ride.
    The bike is nothing more then circles turning circles, It's the human motor that makes it elegant.

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    I can't imagine using clippless pedals yet I can't understand how is he jumping the bike the way he does without losing it.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Blabbing
    Peoples,

    After seeing Danny Macaskill's latest video, I have two technical questions.

    1. I'm curious as to how he doesn't pinch flat or destroy his rear wheel. Does anyone know the specifics of his setup? Specifically: tire pressure, and all the particulars of the equipment (tire, innertube, rim, spokes, and so on). Also, how much does Danny weigh?

    2. When I see the frequency/intensity of the drops and jumps he takes, I'm curious as to how he deals with body soreness. For myself, when I do particularly aggressive riding, I get a very sore neck and traps from all the snapping of the head. I know that this is something you can get used to, and I also know Ryan Leech does yoga to deal with his bodily stresses, but I'm curious to hear what you all have to say about dealing with these repetitive stresses and perhaps increasing your tolerances.

    Thanks for any objective info.
    1. Practice

    2. Practice

    He is a professional
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ProjectDan35
    I want that orange bike he used for his last video. Must be freakin' sweet to ride.
    It's a mullet
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssphoenix
    I can't imagine using clippless pedals yet I can't understand how is he jumping the bike the way he does without losing it.
    he's not, he's using platform pedals. Search bunny hop, or better yet, search for Ryan Leech instruction video on youtube.
    Down is the new up.

  9. #9
    Big Gulps, Alright!
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    1. BMX guys have been doing this sort of stuff for eons. Fat rim, and a good build results in a super strong wheel. Plus, I'm sure if he tacos one, someone's there to give him a replacement. For street riding, high pressure is the way to go. Hence, no flats.

    2. He does this all the time. So his body is used to it, and trained to accommodate it.
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    Basically, you guys are telling me that you don't know anything specific....

    Berkley, when you say, "Fat rim," what does that mean? Does anyone know what kind of rims Danny runs? "High pressure." What's that? 50 psi? 60 psi? 42.8?

    "Practice" and "He does this all the time?!"

    Wow. So much for objectivity....

    I have a friend who does hand balancing, like what you'd see on Cirque du Soleil. He can talk my ear off on EXACTLY what it takes to be able to do what he does. Sure, he's been practicing for as many as 6-8 hours a day for the past four years, and even longer, but if I ask him WHAT he practices he can tell me exactly what stretches he does and what areas of the body he works, along with what changes to expect in physiology, and what are the individual goals he's trying to hit, each time. That's because he's gone through it and knows what he's doing.

    I've often asked trials questions, before, but the only people, who reply, are those who don't do it and who don't know!

    If I thought I were able to actually ask Ryan Leech or Danny Macaskill or Dylan Korba, themselves, I would.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Blabbing
    Basically, you guys are telling me that you don't know anything specific....
    Yep.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Blabbing
    "Practice" and "He does this all the time?!"

    Wow. So much for objectivity....
    What'd you expect. This is the internets.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Blabbing
    I have a friend who does hand balancing, like what you'd see on Cirque du Soleil. He can talk my ear off on EXACTLY what it takes to be able to do what he does.
    Call him up. You can then be like a Blue Man on a bike.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Blabbing
    If I thought I were able to actually ask Ryan Leech or Danny Macaskill or Dylan Korba, themselves, I would.
    We'll be watching this post. I hope it works out.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Blabbing
    Basically, you guys are telling me that you don't know anything specific....

    Berkley, when you say, "Fat rim," what does that mean? Does anyone know what kind of rims Danny runs? "High pressure." What's that? 50 psi? 60 psi? 42.8?

    "Practice" and "He does this all the time?!"

    Wow. So much for objectivity....

    I have a friend who does hand balancing, like what you'd see on Cirque du Soleil. He can talk my ear off on EXACTLY what it takes to be able to do what he does. Sure, he's been practicing for as many as 6-8 hours a day for the past four years, and even longer, but if I ask him WHAT he practices he can tell me exactly what stretches he does and what areas of the body he works, along with what changes to expect in physiology, and what are the individual goals he's trying to hit, each time. That's because he's gone through it and knows what he's doing.

    I've often asked trials questions, before, but the only people, who reply, are those who don't do it and who don't know!

    If I thought I were able to actually ask Ryan Leech or Danny Macaskill or Dylan Korba, themselves, I would.
    Were you really expecting that kind of detail from us and then insulting us for not having it?

    Far rim = probably at least 32mm wide. Tire pressure probably varies with what he's doing and where he is. If you want more detailed answers go to one of the trials forums, not MTBr

  13. #13
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    I was typing up almost exactly what Berkley said last night and decided to not even be a part of this thread...but today...different thoughts.

    high pressure = 90psi+. I always rode at least 90 psi for my street BMX.

    And yes...if you do something well...it's because of practice. That practice makes your body handle those activities...and that's one reason you're good at it.

    However...to handle those long drops. Look how he lands. He pushes his rear tire down to land as early as possible then slowly drops down the front tire...not exactly slow, but he slows it down. This dampens the hit on legs while also minimizing the hit your arms take. Landing like this takes upper body and core strength to keep your front wheel from slamming into the ground thus jarring your whole body extremly harshly. You still need to train a ton to make these landings not painful.

    I've found landing both wheels at the same time is a sure way to have sore wrists, and for your face to smash into your bars.

    Look at skateboarders...they do drops half the height of what he's doing, and they end up having to land and basically sit on the board to absorb the impact. These guys on bikes don't need to bend their legs that much to absord the impact. They use their planted rear tire as fulcrum point to help absorb some of it.

    Make sense?

  14. #14
    El Gato Malo
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    Google "danny macaskill interview" it'll answer most of your questions.

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    Here are the basics...

    Biography
    How old are you and where are you from?
    - I'm 25 years old and from Edinburgh, United Kingdom

    What is your day job?
    - Professional rider

    Every top rider needs to be well fueled, what is your favourite food?
    - Quiche

    And your favourite beverage?
    - Red Bull

    Have you got any pets?
    - A dog called Meg

    What kind of music do you listen to?
    - Judas Priest, anything good

    How long have you been riding?
    - 13 years

    Where is the best place you have ever ridden?
    - Leeds or Bristol

    Can you give us a quick run down of your current bike spec?
    - Inspired Prototype frame
    - Inspired Prototype forks
    - Inspired Pivotal seat and post
    - Hope Headset
    - Shimano Saint front brake and cranks
    - Hope Pro2 hubs
    - Hope FR Stem
    - Pro Handlebars
    - Atom Lab rims
    - A few other secret Inspired prototypes

  16. #16
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    Funny. I remember seeing that stat sheet on Inspired's site back earlier this year. I am almost positive that his favorite drink was NOT red bull! Oh yes, how big money changes everything.

    Ryan

    PS- That kid is probably one of the most talented athletes I have ever seen. And, after watching some of his earlier videos, he seems to be pretty humble and real good natured. I don't mean to disparage him by poking fun of the red bull thing.

    Quote Originally Posted by tbsmitty
    Biography
    How old are you and where are you from?
    - I'm 25 years old and from Edinburgh, United Kingdom

    What is your day job?
    - Professional rider

    Every top rider needs to be well fueled, what is your favourite food?
    - Quiche

    And your favourite beverage?
    - Red Bull

    Have you got any pets?
    - A dog called Meg

    What kind of music do you listen to?
    - Judas Priest, anything good

    How long have you been riding?
    - 13 years

    Where is the best place you have ever ridden?
    - Leeds or Bristol

    Can you give us a quick run down of your current bike spec?
    - Inspired Prototype frame
    - Inspired Prototype forks
    - Inspired Pivotal seat and post
    - Hope Headset
    - Shimano Saint front brake and cranks
    - Hope Pro2 hubs
    - Hope FR Stem
    - Pro Handlebars
    - Atom Lab rims
    - A few other secret Inspired prototypes

  17. #17
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    Being a former bmx guy I can also tell you that alot of the parts we ran from companies were in fact custom prototype stuff. Also when you watch a video that is only a small % of what was actually filmed. Film makers go through endless hours of video just for a minute of "acceptable footage" I dont know about Danny but from personal expierence alot of the tricks we did that were filmed took more than just one attempt to do. That's because of crashes, mechanical failures, bad camera angles etc. The videos that are posted and distributed are already edited and leave out all the bad stuff. To do what he is doing I would say he is running tire pressure of 80-120 psi which that is what most bmx guys use with 32mm wide wheels and 32-48 spokes. As far as his body you build up a tolerance to those sort of impacts. Kind of like riding a road bike for the first time the seat makes your ass really sore but the more you ride the more used to it you get. Also he is a pro rider so he spends most of his time riding therefore he does it more than most people.

  18. #18
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Blabbing
    If I thought I were able to actually ask Ryan Leech or Danny Macaskill or Dylan Korba, themselves, I would.
    Leech sells a how-to DVD.


    He talks a lot about practicing.
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  19. #19
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    Dannymacaskill just had a Q&A where you could submit your own question my very own question was answered by him aswell. You're about 2 days late to ask him now though.
    Search through the questions to see if you can find answers to anything you wanted to know! Link below.
    http://www.redbullusa.com/cs/Satelli...21242927644894

  20. #20
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    Guys,

    Thanks a ton for some of that information.

    I find the tire pressures fascinating. In the frame building section of this forum, there was a thread about trials' frame geometry. Basically, there's been a lot of evolution in riding style, hence the reason for some major changes in trials frame geometry. I had previously asked trials riders what pressures they were running, and it was in the neighborhood of 20 - 25 psi. I asked, how the heck do you not get pinch flats? The reply was that a lot of the hopping in trials riding was much less dynamic than coming up short when trying to bunnyhop a curb at street speed. Bottom line: there are some very different types of "trials" riding styles, and Danny's definitely got one of the most dynamic styles, possible. I knew he couldn't possibly be running anything less than 50 psi.

    Boomn, the only other experience I've had on bike forums is on Pinkbike, where objectivity isn't even in the dictionary. I've been spending more time on here, because people seem to be (more) mature.

    Gearwhine, thanks for the info regarding drops. I am familiar with the technique and have so far worked my way up to about 3 feet, to flat concrete. While I can handle that distance, predictably, sometimes I get the technique well enough that there's very little impact, other times I'm really putting in the muscle to keep from experiencing the slam. I don't feel I have it, well enough, to go higher distances, just yet.

    Prostreet, thanks for that info. I did not know that BMXers were running rims that wide and pressures that high. I knew 90 psi but not 120. Wow.

    Here's a comment you all might find interesting: there was a grave excavation (either in South or Central America, this was in National Geographic) of a Spanish Conquistador. They could tell, by examining the skeleton, that the particular person had been a sword fighter, because his right wrist bones were much larger than his left wrist bones. I think of the types of impacts modern bicycle athletes, particularly BMXers, sustain, and I can't help but think their skeletal structure and connective tissues must be radically different from everyone else, obviously not from nature but due to environment.

  21. #21
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    Something else you might find interesting: The skies are full of variable stars.
    These are stars that go through a cycle of fading and brightening, so they look like they’re winking.
    Cepheid variables have very quick cycles, some as short as 12 hours.
    In 1912, American astronomer Henrietta Leavitt discovered a connection between a Cepheid’s cycle and its brightness: the slower the cycle, the brighter the star.
    She didn’t know it, but she had just discovered a way to measure the universe.


    To put it simply, Danny works his arse off everyday to do what does.... Even If I knew how, I still could not do it. He is that talented...

  22. #22
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    So, if you are working on 3ft drops why are you concerned with soreness and danny's rim choices?

    Bottom like, Danny is in the .000001% of guys who can do what he does. Similar to pro bodybuilders who have freak genetics and can accomplish things mere mortals cannot come close to no matter how hard they train or what they put in their bodies. Chances are you can train 24/7 and not be 10% the rider Danny is, that's just how it works. I also think he is freakishly strong. Hes probably the type of guy who can throw up insane weight in the gym having never touched a weight in his life. His explosive strength is incredible.
    MrR

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Blabbing

    I have a friend who does hand balancing, like what you'd see on Cirque du Soleil. He can talk my ear off on EXACTLY what it takes to be able to do what he does. Sure, he's been practicing for as many as 6-8 hours a day for the past four years, and even longer, but if I ask him WHAT he practices he can tell me exactly what stretches he does and what areas of the body he works, along with what changes to expect in physiology, and what are the individual goals he's trying to hit, each time. That's because he's gone through it and knows what he's doing.
    Being a former professional athlete - and not mountain biking so I am no expert in this sport - what people said here is correct in general:
    - Natural talent - this is what gets you to the level of a professional or elite
    - Ungodly amounts of practice and the commitment to practice - this is what makes you the best or one of the best.

    Now, your hand balancing friend has has his practice routine and of course he knows it inside out. But the next hand balancing expert will have a different routine that works for him. This is the point - the practice is the common thread, the practice routine varies widely.

    I can tell you that in my former sport I had my routine - and it was different even from my own brother who was also a pro. It changes from guy to guy.
    Last edited by gdlals; 11-20-2010 at 05:10 PM.

  24. #24
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    Guys, sarcasm will get you no respect.

    It's obvious to me that many of you are missing the basic idea, here: just simply saying, he's incredibly good, he practices all day long, it's what he does, these are actually, in a certain sense, patronizing comments. Any real pro, who has his particular regimen, secrets, tricks, and lifetime of experiential knowledge, even if he can't explicate it or isn't even objectively aware of what all enables him to do what he does will appreciate the fact that a fan views his achievement in a complex, composite manner as opposed to some simplistic, "Dude, you're just awesome," simple take. That's the whole reason masters "get off" on having an apprentice: they're not interested in having a bunch of fawning, sycophantic morons for a fan base.

    Maybe, for a lot of you, you just simply see what Danny does as unattainable, hence why even question the technique. Fair enough. For me, I asked some objective questions, because I really am capable of wonder and really do seek to know. No need to make fun of me for that.

    Penn Rider, while you may think my story concerning the Spanish Conquistador is kind of irrelevant, there are studies that show road bikers actually have poor skeletal composition/bone density, because road biking does not involve gravitational impacts like mountain biking does. You can have all the bulging quads you want and still have pretty fragile bones.

    Mr Rogers, I disagree when you say Danny's "probably the type of guy who can throw up insane weight in the gym." I think I can understand what you mean when you say he's freakishly strong and has explosive strength, but there's definitely a difference between overall lifting ability and fast-twitch muscle ability. Just look at the guys: Danny, Ryan Leech, Dylan Korba, Chris Akrigg, none of these guys is bulging with muscles. In fact, Chris Akrigg's legs look positively mundane compared to most roadies' legs.

    Gdlals, I appreciate your comment, coming from your perspective as a professional athlete, but I'd be curious to know what your discipline was, and also what your brother's disciple was. If you look at the four guys I mentioned immediately above, their physiques are not radically different. I doubt you'll find any short, stocky, muscly guy doing the kind of dynamic trials riding those guys do. Being able to routinely do high drops, and high bunnyhops, must have some common thread for these guys.

    All these points just beg more and more questions, at least for those of us, who are not too simplistic or embarrassed to ask.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Blabbing
    Guys, sarcasm will get you no respect.

    It's obvious to me that many of you are missing the basic idea, here: just simply saying, he's incredibly good, he practices all day long, it's what he does, these are actually, in a certain sense, patronizing comments. Any real pro, who has his particular regimen, secrets, tricks, and lifetime of experiential knowledge, even if he can't explicate it or isn't even objectively aware of what all enables him to do what he does will appreciate the fact that a fan views his achievement in a complex, composite manner as opposed to some simplistic, "Dude, you're just awesome," simple take. That's the whole reason masters "get off" on having an apprentice: they're not interested in having a bunch of fawning, sycophantic morons for a fan base.

    Maybe, for a lot of you, you just simply see what Danny does as unattainable, hence why even question the technique. Fair enough. For me, I asked some objective questions, because I really am capable of wonder and really do seek to know. No need to make fun of me for that.

    Penn Rider, while you may think my story concerning the Spanish Conquistador is kind of irrelevant, there are studies that show road bikers actually have poor skeletal composition/bone density, because road biking does not involve gravitational impacts like mountain biking does. You can have all the bulging quads you want and still have pretty fragile bones.

    Mr Rogers, I disagree when you say Danny's "probably the type of guy who can throw up insane weight in the gym." I think I can understand what you mean when you say he's freakishly strong and has explosive strength, but there's definitely a difference between overall lifting ability and fast-twitch muscle ability. Just look at the guys: Danny, Ryan Leech, Dylan Korba, Chris Akrigg, none of these guys is bulging with muscles. In fact, Chris Akrigg's legs look positively mundane compared to most roadies' legs.

    Gdlals, I appreciate your comment, coming from your perspective as a professional athlete, but I'd be curious to know what your discipline was, and also what your brother's disciple was. If you look at the four guys I mentioned immediately above, their physiques are not radically different. I doubt you'll find any short, stocky, muscly guy doing the kind of dynamic trials riding those guys do. Being able to routinely do high drops, and high bunnyhops, must have some common thread for these guys.

    All these points just beg more and more questions, at least for those of us, who are not too simplistic or embarrassed to ask.

    Great post Tim!
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  26. #26
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    Patronizing? Most of us understand the basic concepts of what he does, no need to go into how he grips his pedals when he hops, or pushes his bike forward on a transition jump, or even lands rear wheel first then front then absorbs the rest of the impact with body on an insane drop. You can see that clearly in the video(s). He does what everybody who rides in that sport does and he does it over and over again, practicing the same skills over and over adding new ones along the way. Crap, I am in no position to write you a manual about how he does what he does. The boy is a freak of nature doing insanely cool things on a bike. That should be enough. Many here have alluded to that but something doesn't register with you.
    The study was cyclists and bone density. The study did not say that MTB was any better. It did recommend that you should add weight bearing exercise such as resistance training or running to your training program.
    Last edited by penn_rider; 11-21-2010 at 07:53 AM.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Blabbing
    Basically, you guys are telling me that you don't know anything specific....

    Berkley, when you say, "Fat rim," what does that mean? Does anyone know what kind of rims Danny runs? "High pressure." What's that? 50 psi? 60 psi? 42.8?

    "Practice" and "He does this all the time?!"

    Wow. So much for objectivity....
    Bingo. Until you ask him, or someone that knows him, all you're going to get is speculation. I think the answers given have been pretty specific, given the amount of info available. For one, he's got a bomber bike set up. No doubt a wide rim, probably pretty heavy too. Tire pressure? Who knows. Could be low, as mentioned, but for some of the stuff he does, it is most certainly higher. I wouldn't doubt that he switches it up from time to time based on what/where he'll be riding. I know I do, and I'm not a pro by any means.

    Skill-wise, he's smooth. So much in riding is weight balance, which he does very well and probably accomplishes through practice. There's not a lot of other ways to learn that sort of stuff, short of just getting out there and doing it. Sure, he might get in the gym and do upper body work, but I've seen BMX guys bunny hop several feet in the air - guys that certainly weren't going to the gym. So it is possible.

    Sorry we can't give you scientific details. But they might not be as valuable as you'd think. As someone mentioned earlier, what works for him, might not work for you and vice versa. Best suggestion? get out and start practicing.
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  28. #28
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    It's entirely possible that he doesn't do any weight lifting, yoga, stretching or anything else. I was never anywhere near pro, but when I rode trials and street exclusively, most of the really good riders I knew(who were either pro or near good enough) did none of those. Some of them did, but most didn't. They just rode, a lot, and had a ton of natural talent, coordination, dedication, and passion for what they were doing.

  29. #29
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    Tiny wheels. No suspension. Sean Burns. Check out 0:58!!



    Honestly, back in my BMX heyday we used to drop off some pretty high things - 5-6 feet. My friend rode off a roof of a storage unit to flat ground. We had quill stems and frames that broke all the time.

    My body is messed up from that type of riding. We also inflated our tires to 100psi, but there definetely is a way to manipulate your body when you land to eleviate the jarring. You really just have to remain loose on the bike.

    But like I said, that type of riding I used to do is not wihout consequence. We used to do 6 foot fly-outs to flat all the time.

    To this day, I can bunnyhop 3-4 feet after a day of practice on my 20". The landing, even at that lower height, hurts me. I've pretty much have had to give up riding my 20" because it kills my MTB'ing. Two days of consecutive BMX riding ruins 2 weeks of MTB'ing. I don't know how my friends in their 40's still do it consistently. BMX riding is crash after crash after crash.
    Last edited by Dion; 11-21-2010 at 11:02 AM.

  30. #30
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    Wow, That guy, Sean, just gave a whole new meaning to "wear a helmet".

  31. #31
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    Burns is killing it! That was an epic vid section. Guarantee he doesn't do yoga.

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    As much as I love Danny Macaskill's vids, you guys really ought to look at some of the newer BMX vids. The skills and creativity are mind blowing. I'll post them as I have been to spread the love. The BMX lifestyle is something else... I kinda miss it. But having a job and money is nice.

    Except for the absolute top, top level BMX riders I can't think of any of them who do yoga. They just ride.

    As the MMA figher, Jason "Mayhem" Miller said on Joe Rogan's podcast, "We destroy our bodies for your entertainment..."

    And then... in comes Ron Wilkerson, freestyle legend, still killing it at age 43! He's very herbal, though. He's a fellow veggie and really into the natural, wholistic stuff. HIs company is in Santa Cruz (2Hip). He may be into yoga and stuff.


  33. #33
    All 26.5" all the time!
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    Have to agree with Dion, the BMX guys have been doing that stuff for eons.


    <iframe title="YouTube video player" class="youtube-player" type="text/html" width="480" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/fbB6q7ZRf4E?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe>

  34. #34
    Mountain Man Dan
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    Maybe it's because of all the objects Danny jumps off of? Castles, drift wood at the beach, his own RV, bridges, stairs, buildings. He's not just riding in circles at some crummy ass skate park.
    The bike is nothing more then circles turning circles, It's the human motor that makes it elegant.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Blabbing
    Basically, you guys are telling me that you don't know anything specific....

    Berkley, when you say, "Fat rim," what does that mean? Does anyone know what kind of rims Danny runs? "High pressure." What's that? 50 psi? 60 psi? 42.8?

    "Practice" and "He does this all the time?!"

    Wow. So much for objectivity....

    I have a friend who does hand balancing, like what you'd see on Cirque du Soleil. He can talk my ear off on EXACTLY what it takes to be able to do what he does. Sure, he's been practicing for as many as 6-8 hours a day for the past four years, and even longer, but if I ask him WHAT he practices he can tell me exactly what stretches he does and what areas of the body he works, along with what changes to expect in physiology, and what are the individual goals he's trying to hit, each time. That's because he's gone through it and knows what he's doing.

    I've often asked trials questions, before, but the only people, who reply, are those who don't do it and who don't know!

    If I thought I were able to actually ask Ryan Leech or Danny Macaskill or Dylan Korba, themselves, I would.
    You're right. We don't know anything. Sorry. But it does beg the question, "What did you realistically expect to learn about professional trials riding from a group of (mostly) amateur mountain bikers?"

  36. #36
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    Hey, you guys are really good! You've actually made me forget what the heck I was originally asking!!!

    Malibu, thanks for the affirmation. These forums (or is it fora?) are meant to be a knowledge base to help us all. We should be able to ask our questions and get some kind of benefit from it all instead of being made to feel like idiots.

    Props to Sean Salach and Dion. Those are exactly the kind of answers I was looking for. First of all, their answers are directed towards my point no. 2. They are answering from the perspective of personal experience how they deal with the intense stresses of high drops and jumps. That was what I was looking for, originally. I was not interested in how Danny was able to perform the tricks and stunts he does; I was asking how he deals with the stresses. Is it yoga (like Ryan Leech), does he get massages after every single session, does he hit the hot tub, are there special stretches, or what...? Dion, your comment is particularly telling. I remember first hearing about Ryan Leech doing yoga, and I really didn't understand at that time. Then, as my riding got more and more aggressive, I realized: going more and more intense takes its toll on your body. And, the older you get the less your body can take and the longer it takes to heal.

    Penn rider, without each of us ending up on each others' sh#tlist, and with reference to your last comment, "Many here have alluded to that but something doesn't register with you," I hope the above clarifies where I was coming from. Again, I was interested in the recuperation and not the capability (although the two cannot be completely separated). Concerning your comment about the article, what makes you think you read the same article I did? The one I read made an explicit comparison between road and mountain bikers.

    BTW, that video of Sean Burns is the most painful, winceful video I have ever seen. I can't believe that guy doesn't just freakin rip an entire limb off on some of those bails. With no offense to him, I wonder how much medical marijuana he currently uses, let's not even think about his body rebelling in old age!!!

    This all begs another question, which is a side point to this thread: it's really cool to be able to push the limits, but for myself I saw, long ago, that much of the aggressive trick/stunt stuff was being done by kids as a way to prove themselves and one-up each other. I would go to jump sites or parks and the tension in the air was oppressive. They didn't even seem to be having fun. Wow, great way to spend your recreation time. I vowed, for myself, that my riding would be for the sake of fun and not pride. Having said all that, conquering challenges is fun, but I don't need anyone else to one-up to find my challenges: I can find them, well enough, on my own.
    Last edited by Tim Blabbing; 11-22-2010 at 09:31 AM.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Blabbing View Post
    Peoples,

    After seeing Danny Macaskill's latest video, I have two technical questions.

    1. I'm curious as to how he doesn't pinch flat or destroy his rear wheel. Does anyone know the specifics of his setup? Specifically: tire pressure, and all the particulars of the equipment (tire, innertube, rim, spokes, and so on). Also, how much does Danny weigh?

    2. When I see the frequency/intensity of the drops and jumps he takes, I'm curious as to how he deals with body soreness. For myself, when I do particularly aggressive riding, I get a very sore neck and traps from all the snapping of the head. I know that this is something you can get used to, and I also know Ryan Leech does yoga to deal with his bodily stresses, but I'm curious to hear what you all have to say about dealing with these repetitive stresses and perhaps increasing your tolerances.

    Thanks for any objective info.

    Frame and Forks
    - Frame: Inspired Skye, 12mm bolt through axle, disc only
    - Forks: Inspired Skye, 20mm bolt through axle

    Wheels
    - Front hub: Hope Pro 2 EVO, 20mm bolt through axle, 32h, Black
    - Rear hub: Hope Pro 2 Trials EVO,12mm bolt through axle, 32h, Black (Custom made)
    - Cassette Lockring: Trialtech
    - Chain tensioner: Trialtech Sport, Black
    - Front rim: Atomlab Pimplite, Black
    - Rear rim: Atomlab Pimplite, Black
    - Spokes: Sapim Race DB, Black
    - Wheelbuilds: Hand built in the UK
    - Rim tape: Atomlab
    - Inner tube (front): Maxxis
    - Inner tube (rear): Maxxis
    - Front tyre: Maxxis Holy Roller 24 x 2.4"
    - Rear tyre: Maxxis Holy Roller 24 x 2.4"

    Brakes
    - Front brake: Hope Tech Zone, Black, custom made, with 180mm Trial Zone rotor.
    - Rear brake: Hope Tech Zone, Black , custom made, with 180mm Trial Zone rotor.

    Drivetrain
    - Cranks: Truvativ Holzfeller, 175mm, Black
    - Front Sprocket: Truvativ 22T
    - Chain: KMC Z610
    - Rear Sprocket: Trialtech Sport Splined, 16T
    - Pedals: Inspired Team, Black
    - Bottom bracket: Truvativ Howitzer
    - Bashring: Inspired 4-Bolt

    Seating
    - Saddle: Inspired Pivotal, Black
    - Seatpost: Inspired Pivotal
    - Seat Clamp: Hope, Black

    Steering
    - Headset: Hope, 1-1/8", Black
    - Stem: Hope, 90mm x 10˚, Black
    - Grips: Inspired Lock-On, Black
    - Handlebars: Inspired High Rise, Black, exclusive to the Skye (same geometry as Trialtech High Rise bars)

    Geometry
    - Wheelbase: 990mm
    - Chainstay: 380mm
    - BB Height: +10mm
    - Head Angle: 73˚

    Weight
    - 11.95kg (including pedals)

  38. #38
    mtbr member
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    Here's something you might find interesting (Outside Magazine article about Macaskill and injury rehab):
    Danny MacAskill Can

  39. #39
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    that orange bike is now blue, and it is an inspired skye, built for him by inspired.

  40. #40
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    revive a five year-old thread to tell us that?

  41. #41
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Blabbing View Post

    2. When I see the frequency/intensity of the drops and jumps he takes, I'm curious as to how he deals with body soreness. For myself, when I do particularly aggressive riding, I get a very sore neck and traps from all the snapping of the head. I know that this is something you can get used to, and I also know Ryan Leech does yoga to deal with his bodily stresses, but I'm curious to hear what you all have to say about dealing with these repetitive stresses and perhaps increasing your tolerances.

    Thanks for any objective info.
    To be sure, as an ergonomicist, I think some of those stresses are going to take a cumulative toll on his body. This comes down largely to genetics and some other factors that are hard to pin down, as far as the extent that one person can be affected and another not, but he's young, and that's typically not when the problems show up. Cartilage, joints, tendon sheaths, nerves, etc., these are what I'd be concerned about.

    That said, a huge part of it is core strength. I did two hard DH days just recently with a hard XC ride in between and came out no worse for the wear. Years before I worked on core, this would beat me the hell up and I might not even be able to ride the next day. Now, in addition to massively better stabilization and being able to take run after run, I don't feel like crap the next day (a lot of this relates to how you eat to recover too). In some cases, it takes massive core strength to hold a bike on a particular line IMO, but if you don't, your bike can be driving you and in the processes over-tax muscles and other connective parts. Massive core strength is surely a big part of what he does and how he does it.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

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