Contact lense MTB wearers --how are you managing?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Contact lense MTB wearers --how are you managing?

    So I wear contacts when I ride b/c I get better peripheral vision than with glasses. The only problem is that --while my body feels great --after rides my eyes look as though I've been smoking the, er, herbal remedy. I think the cause has something to do with wind-blown debris and also the lenses drying out some, so I'm contemplating riding with clear riding glasses. Any other contact wearers have any thoughts on this?

  2. #2
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    I ALWAYS wear glasses over my contacts when I ride. My glasses of choice are Smith VooDoo Sliders. I like them because of the multiple lense options (you can buy more aside from the choices that come standard) and the fact that they wrap around my face enough that they keep windborne dust and grit out of my eyes, but they do keep a good bit of wind out of my eyes, as well. That keeps my eyes from getting red and dried out.

    You might also want to consider the brand of lens you're using. If the moisture content of the lens is too low for your eyes, that might cause you problems regardless of the glasses you wear.

  3. #3
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    I only get dry eyes occasionally, but I always ride with glasses. I keep some eyedrops in my camelbak to help with dryness and/or debris.

  4. #4

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    I always where clear lenses over my contacts simply because it keeps dirt, bugs and tree branches out of my eyes. I'd where them even if I had perfect vision.

  5. #5
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    I doc here

    Quote Originally Posted by awai04
    So I wear contacts when I ride b/c I get better peripheral vision than with glasses. The only problem is that --while my body feels great --after rides my eyes look as though I've been smoking the, er, herbal remedy. I think the cause has something to do with wind-blown debris and also the lenses drying out some, so I'm contemplating riding with clear riding glasses. Any other contact wearers have any thoughts on this?
    What contacts are you wearing? What part of the country are you in?
    Astigmatic Visionary

  6. #6
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    wear them all the time

    for about 7 yrs now. Very occasionally they get dried out & feel flamed out. Mostly no big deal at all. I waer sun glasses over tho.

  7. #7
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    I never used to have any problems wearing contacts while riding (or skiing, or boating or whatever). I usually had some sort of eye/sun glasses on, but not always. What about laser surgery?

    Like Panik said, keep some drops in your Camelbak and use them every now and then.


    Quote Originally Posted by www.webster.com
    Main Entry: where
    Pronunciation: 'hwer, 'hwar, 'wer, 'war
    Function: noun
    1 : PLACE, LOCATION <the where and the how of the accident>
    2 : what place, source, or cause <I know where that comes from>
    - where it's at 1 a : a place of central interest or activity b : something (as a topic or field of interest) of primary concern or importance <education is where it's at> 2 : the true nature of things
    - where one is at : one's true position, state, or nature

    Main Entry: wear
    Pronunciation: 'war, 'wer
    Function: verb
    Inflected Form(s): wore /'wOr, 'wor/; worn /'wOrn, 'worn/; wear?ing
    Etymology: Middle English weren, from Old English werian; akin to Old Norse verja to clothe, invest, spend, Latin vestis clothing, garment, Greek hennynai to clothe
    transitive senses
    1 : to bear or have on the person <wore a coat>
    2 a : to use habitually for clothing, adornment, or assistance <wears a toupee> <wear glasses> b : to carry on the person <wear a sword>

  8. #8

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    I wear daily disposable lenses. I keep an extra pair in my pack, just in case one pops out or acts up really bad. I also take eye drops with me, but I find that once I start using the eye drops, my eyes actually dry out faster. It's like the eyedrops displace any oily natural moisture and replace it with water, which dries fast. So I try to avoid the eye drops.

    I also try to schedule things so that I'm putting in my lenses close to the ride time, so they're fresh.

    I always wear glasses. I don't want a rock hitting my eye or something, along with the contact lense issue.

    I would suggest taking a good bit of time trying out glasses, don't order them online (unless you try them out at a store or from a firend first). I tried on a bunch of them until I found the ones that fit best. They don't block my peripheral vision, and they sit close to my eye sockets, so as not to allow much wind or sunlight to get around the lense.

    For me, the best fit was the Optic Nerve Buzzcut, and the Performance Orion was more comfortable and has 3 sets of lenses. This is totally dependent on your face structure. Just just like a bike, I would say fit is important to having things work right. I use the Orions for sunglasses and clear lenses, and the Buzzcuts have yellow lenses. The Orions came with amber lenses, which doesn't work as well as yellow in my lighting conditions, so I'm still using 2 pairs.

    I live in San Diego and there's a lot of dust on trails, it bothers my nose too.

    Ultimately, I want to get laser surgery and just take care of it for good.

  9. #9
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    All your comfort problems usually come from the material you are wearing. Most disposable contacts are "high water" lenses, like acuvue's. They are 58% water, 42% material. It's opposite of what you might think, the higher the water content, the easier they will dry out, especially while riding. They dry out easier because, in the above example, your eyes have to supply 58% of the Acuvue lens with your tears. So a lower water lens will not dry out as easily. When your lenses dry out, they tighten up, and stress out your cornea, and you have comfort problems, especially at the the end of the day or while riding.

    So, if you are having comfort issues with your contacts, you want a lower water lens, or the new silicone hydrogel lenses ( Purevision, O2optix, Acuvue Advance, and Night & Day's)

    The lone exception to the low water content rule is Proclear Biocompatibles. They have a molecule in the lens matrix that mimics your tears, so they tend to not dry out as easily.

    Acuvue's are the most common lens I switch patients out of due to comfort problems here in Colorado.

    Hope that helps.
    Astigmatic Visionary

  10. #10
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    Hey thank you everyone for the replies. I wear soft daily wear contacts, non-disposable. They're two steps better than the hard contacts I once had ten years ago. Still, at the end of the day (sometimes even without riding), my eyes get dried out. What I may in fact do, is to start by wearing protective glasses while riding. On top of that, I think I'll try different contacts. The water-content issue of the lenses is something I haven't thought about, and will be a factor in the next type I try.

    So is laser surgery at a state of maturity now? I do know about the different techniques over the last 15 years. Seems like the currently-favored one is doing well.

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    wow, thanks for the tip on lense types, I'm almost out of lenses and it's time for my exam.

    I'm using Focus Daily lenses, and I want to try something else.

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    I'm obviously not qulified to describe medical procedures, but I have 2 friends that have had the surgery. In their layman's terms, they both had the type of surgery that uses both lasers AND some type of blade, as opposed to the type that uses only a laser. I'm sure somebody knwo that actual names for these variations.

    One of the guys had to go back for a "touch up" on one eye, and it's been fine ever since. The other guy had even better luck and said that his vision has never been so good and he can't believe the tyhings he can see. It think he ended up with better-than 20/20 tho, and I hear result vary depending ot what you start with.

    I have a slight stigmatism, so I'm not sure if I'm a good candidate..

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    An option I've been using for about two years is CRT (corneal refractive therapy). I wear special hard contacts at night while sleeping and during the day, I don't have to wear any corrective lenses. My vision is great, as good as with glasses. There is no permanent change, just stop wearing them and your eye will go back in a couple days. Some disadvantages: it can only correct for a limited amount of astigmatism and you have to wear them every night. Anyway, thought this might be a good alternative.

    Dave

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    Quote Originally Posted by S-Works
    All your comfort problems usually come from the material you are wearing. Most disposable contacts are "high water" lenses, like acuvue's. They are 58% water, 42% material. It's opposite of what you might think, the higher the water content, the easier they will dry out, especially while riding. They dry out easier because, in the above example, your eyes have to supply 58% of the Acuvue lens with your tears. So a lower water lens will not dry out as easily. When your lenses dry out, they tighten up, and stress out your cornea, and you have comfort problems, especially at the the end of the day or while riding.

    So, if you are having comfort issues with your contacts, you want a lower water lens, or the new silicone hydrogel lenses ( Purevision, O2optix, Acuvue Advance, and Night & Day's)

    The lone exception to the low water content rule is Proclear Biocompatibles. They have a molecule in the lens matrix that mimics your tears, so they tend to not dry out as easily.

    Acuvue's are the most common lens I switch patients out of due to comfort problems here in Colorado.

    Hope that helps.

    I wear Focus Monthly Toric lenses, although I take them out nightly. I also wear Oakley M frame sunglasses which keeps dust and wind out of my eyes. I rarely have a problem and if I do its on a long epic ride at high altitude...even then I just do a bunch of blinking and they are fine. I do carry a spare contact and some drops, but haven't used them.

    Can you tell me are the Focus Monthly Toric lenses high water content or not?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Draisine Velocipede, PHD
    I'm obviously not qulified to describe medical procedures, but I have 2 friends that have had the surgery. In their layman's terms, they both had the type of surgery that uses both lasers AND some type of blade, as opposed to the type that uses only a laser. I'm sure somebody knwo that actual names for these variations.

    One of the guys had to go back for a "touch up" on one eye, and it's been fine ever since. The other guy had even better luck and said that his vision has never been so good and he can't believe the tyhings he can see. It think he ended up with better-than 20/20 tho, and I hear result vary depending ot what you start with.

    I have a slight stigmatism, so I'm not sure if I'm a good candidate..

    Yes, but your astigmatism is best corrected with this laser.

    www.insightlasik.com

    There are technological differences between the different systems.
    Astigmatic Visionary

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by EJBlur
    I wear Focus Monthly Toric lenses, although I take them out nightly. I also wear Oakley M frame sunglasses which keeps dust and wind out of my eyes. I rarely have a problem and if I do its on a long epic ride at high altitude...even then I just do a bunch of blinking and they are fine. I do carry a spare contact and some drops, but haven't used them.

    Can you tell me are the Focus Monthly Toric lenses high water content or not?

    Focus is high water. For toric lenses you want to try Cooper Preference toric. 90 day repl. schedule. Very good lens.
    Astigmatic Visionary

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave719
    An option I've been using for about two years is CRT (corneal refractive therapy). I wear special hard contacts at night while sleeping and during the day, I don't have to wear any corrective lenses. My vision is great, as good as with glasses. There is no permanent change, just stop wearing them and your eye will go back in a couple days. Some disadvantages: it can only correct for a limited amount of astigmatism and you have to wear them every night. Anyway, thought this might be a good alternative.

    Dave

    I've been fitting these for about two years now. I've not seen the "approved" levels of astigmatism corrected very well. Nearsightedness turns out pretty good. My 12yo was my first fit two years ago, he loves it.

    check out: www.ortho-k.net for info.
    Astigmatic Visionary

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by awai04
    So is laser surgery at a state of maturity now? I do know about the different techniques over the last 15 years. Seems like the currently-favored one is doing well.
    I had my eyes done going on 5 years ago. My vision is 20/15 (actually, slightly better in one eye, very slightly worse in the other; both better than 20/20). I have no complications, no side effects and, most importantly, no more contacts or glasses.

    Because of my job (Naval aviation), I had what's called PRK instead of LASIK. The difference is that they don't make the flap in PRK, they remove the "skin" of your eye to do the correction; the correction is exactly the same as LASIK once this is done. The upside of this is that your eye structure isn't cut/compromised whatsoever. The downside is that there is discomfort - and for some people, significant pain - for a couple of days after the surgery. The healing process took about a month to be fully stable (basically before the flight surgeon cleared me to fly again) and for about 6 months I had some ghost images at night and minor "star" effects around lights.

    I'm a believer. But, make sure your screening doctor is good because if you're not a candidate, you shouldn't have it done. In fact, I'd consider going to a doctor who doesn't do the surgery for a screen, since he has no stake in whether you do the surgery or not.

    From what I understand now, the computers that drive the lasers are so much more advanced now that many places GUARANTEE 20/20 vision. If you can afford it... go for it!!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by skiahh
    The upside of this is that your eye structure isn't cut/compromised whatsoever.
    Oh yes it is. You no longer have the basement membrane for your epithelium, the outer layer they scrape off to access the level of cornea for the procedure. And there is some debate on whether that is a big deal or not.

    One word of caution, the places that guranty 20/20 usually charge alot more the the guaranty. Something on the order to 2x for the procedure.
    Last edited by S-Works; 07-29-2005 at 07:18 AM.
    Astigmatic Visionary

  20. #20
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    That is funny- my problem is just the opposite. When riding, I completely forget about my contacts, but doing things like driving or looking at my monitor my eyes get very red and dry. I've been looking for a contact I can wear all the time, and here is what I've come up with. Your results may vary.

    Bausch & Lomb 2-week: My first contact and baseline. Not bad outside, but insdie my eyes would get unbelieveably, horror-movie red.
    Focus Day&Night: Good lens, but kind of thick. My eyes would get about 30% as red as the B&L's
    Acuvue Advanced: also a good lens- slightly better than the focus for me. About ~27% as red as the B&L
    O2 optix: One of the best- about 25% as red as the B&L
    ProClear: Equal but different than the O2 Optix. Sometimes the ProClear would feel better, other times the O2 optix would feel better. Equal redness to each other. ProClears are a very thin, soft lens, but made of a more traditional material than the lenses above. In the end the results are equal- I could take either one.

    Even at 25% as red as the B&L people still say "you're eyes are pretty bloodshot". Gives you an idea of how bad they were with the B&L 2-weeks! However, when riding they don't give me any trouble.

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