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  1. #1
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    Can a shock pump do doube duty?

    I have a new FS mountain bike, and understand that over the next year I will be trying out and adjusting my suspension settings to get the best ride for the different condition types. For that, I need to bring with me a suspension pump that can handle the high pressure for the front and rear shocks.

    But as I am not pressing my luck right now and converting my wheelset to tubeless, I am going to be bringing a spare inner tube in case I get a flat. But that will involve needing a pump for them to work.

    Now as I will have a shock pump, do I also need to get myself a small innertube pump or a CO2 mini pump to keep with me. Or can the shock pump act as double duty and with an adaptor be used to pump up a tire innertube if I do end up needing to replace one because of a flat?

  2. #2
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    You need a separate pump for the wheels. Suspension require high pressure (and low volume) while mtb wheels require high volume (and usually low pressure).


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  3. #3
    since 4/10/2009
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    Though you could technically use a shock pump to inflate a tire, you'll be going at it for a LONG TIME because shock pumps push such a small volume of air. Your buddies will probably just leave you for the bears/mt lions/raccoons/rabid squirrels/whatever wildlife you have in your area.

    You are better off getting separate pumps. My Blackburn tire pump is close to 20yrs old and still works like a champ. CO2 causes problems with many sealants, so it's usually less preferred, unless you're talking about seating the bead of a tubeless tire in the woods. Also, if you mess up, or need to deal with more than one inflation, your CO2 inflator is useless once you've used up however many CO2 cylinders you're carrying. The tire pump is just more useful. The shock pump is something you don't need to carry with you ALL THE TIME. Carry it when you're doing suspension setup, but you can leave it home most of the time otherwise.

  4. #4
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    Even when you go tubeless, you'll want to carry a spare tube.

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  5. #5
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    It would work but you'd have to convert your wheels to schrader valved and it would probably take about 2,000 strokes to fill a tire. Also I agree you still should carry a tube for tubeless. Just buy a cheap mini-pump and/or co2.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  6. #6
    EAT MORE GRIME
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    sure, use a shock pump for tires.

    12 hours pumping, you can see the sun rise on your night ride started the day before

    ^ way more than 2000 strokes

    -------------
    you can buy a dual mode pump,

    https://www.serfas.com/shop/products...-1-shock-pump/
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  7. #7
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    Ok.. Glad that I asked. I will take a look for a small pump for my tires that I can carry with me in my backpack or see if there is one that looks OK bolted to the side of the bike (water bottle mounts).

  8. #8
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    A very rough calc says 2500 strokes to get you to 15 psi on a typical 29" tire, which would be about 20 minutes of pumping at 2 strokes/sec. 30 psi would be twice that. I have a small Topeak Racerocket MT minipump which cuts that down by a factor of 4. That's still ~600 strokes and 5 minutes to get to 15. Fortunately, I've rarely had to use it.

    The calc assumes the tire starts out fully shaped and not collapsed. In all likelihood it won't be and you have to add another several hundred strokes or so.
    Do the math.

  9. #9
    EAT MORE GRIME
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    A very rough calc says 2500 strokes to get you to 15 psi on a typical 29" tire, which would be about 20 minutes of pumping at 2 strokes/sec. 30 psi would be twice that. I have a small Topeak Racerocket MT minipump which cuts that down by a factor of 4. That's still ~600 strokes and 5 minutes to get to 15. Fortunately, I've rarely had to use it.
    2 strokes a second, I'mma gonna need a pack of Camels and a lotta smoke breaks...
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    A very rough calc says 2500 strokes to get you to 15 psi on a typical 29" tire, which would be about 20 minutes of pumping at 2 strokes/sec. 30 psi would be twice that. I have a small Topeak Racerocket MT minipump which cuts that down by a factor of 4. That's still ~600 strokes and 5 minutes to get to 15. Fortunately, I've rarely had to use it.

    The calc assumes the tire starts out fully shaped and not collapsed. In all likelihood it won't be and you have to add another several hundred strokes or so.
    So, carry a few CO2 cartridges
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  11. #11
    Mr. Buck E. Fikes
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    We need to get Picard to do a test of how many strokes to fill a 6fiddyplus tire.

    And when he's completed that task to our liking, count the number of licks to get to the center of a tootsie pop.

  12. #12
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by roadkill401 View Post
    bolted to the side of the bike (water bottle mounts).
    I've used a bottle cage mount pump for years and it just kind of disappears on the bike. I rarely need to use it but it's there if I need it.

  13. #13
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    Years ago I had a pump that could do high pressure low volume, or low pressure not-so-low volume, with the turn of a knob. It didn't do either one particularly well.
    A plateau is the highest form of flattery.

  14. #14
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    You don't need to bring a shock pump. it might be better not to, actually.

    Get your baseline setup and do a full ride before changing anything. Ride for a week even. Too many small changes can be more confusing than helpful.

    With brand new suspension you can get away with bringing a shock pump and leaving it in the car. Parking lot bounce tests get you in the ballpark.

  15. #15
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    I have a dual action pump that works quite well. Perfectly as a shock pump, and good enough to get you going again as a tyre pump. The end twists and then a 2nd part of larger diameter telescopes out to give high volume. It comes with an adaptor so that it can do both presta and schrader.

    Sorry, I'm too lazy to go to the shed right now to check the brand, but there are probably a bunch of them sold under different brands.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by phreeky View Post
    I have a dual action pump that works quite well. Perfectly as a shock pump, and good enough to get you going again as a tyre pump. The end twists and then a 2nd part of larger diameter telescopes out to give high volume. It comes with an adaptor so that it can do both presta and schrader.

    Sorry, I'm too lazy to go to the shed right now to check the brand, but there are probably a bunch of them sold under different brands.

    Is it made to be a suspension pump or a tire pump? Does it have a gauge? I've never seen a tire pump that could work on a shock.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  17. #17
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    It's made as a shock pump but to double-duty as a tyre pump. OK I'm feeling guilty/lazy, I'll go check the brand now.

  18. #18
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by phreeky View Post
    I have a dual action pump that works quite well. Perfectly as a shock pump, and good enough to get you going again as a tyre pump. The end twists and then a 2nd part of larger diameter telescopes out to give high volume. It comes with an adaptor so that it can do both presta and schrader.

    Sorry, I'm too lazy to go to the shed right now to check the brand, but there are probably a bunch of them sold under different brands.
    Sounds like the one I had. It was similar to this one but I don't recall that being the brand. The high pressure mode stopped working on mine.

    There's a bunch of other brands & styles on eBay. The selection wasn't so great 6 years ago.
    A plateau is the highest form of flattery.

  20. #20
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Is it made to be a suspension pump or a tire pump? Does it have a gauge? I've never seen a tire pump that could work on a shock.
    I have seen such a pump before that's made to do either suspension or tires. I have to figure there's a good reason more manufacturers don't make such a thing. If it worked WELL, then everybody would have a version.

  21. #21
    Not helpful.
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    You spelled 'doobie' wrong.
    What's wrong with him??

  22. #22
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    You are really overthinking suspension setup, changing the air pressure for different conditions is not how it works (unless youre on something like a downhill bike). You need to set the rear at the correct sag designated by your manufacturer, the suspension system is designed around that sag, if you "customize" it you will ruin the performance and end up with a bobbing or wallowing bike.

    Fork pressure is a little more customizable but not by much, if you do some big drops then you can add a little more pressure. You still want to be within the range of the suggested sag setting. If the fork is bottoming out a lot at 20% sag then add a spacer, much better than adding pressure.

    If you want to tweak your suspension you should be using spacers or play with the rebound, dont mess with the air pressure much. Theres no reason to bring a shock pump.

  23. #23
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    Don't forget the guy who broke a vertebra because of the shock pump in his camelbak.
    Keep trying to do the awesomest thing you've ever done.

  24. #24
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    With CO2 being a problem with sealant, I've been wondering where the air cartridges or battery pumps are in the marketplace

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
    With CO2 being a problem with sealant, I've been wondering where the air cartridges or battery pumps are in the marketplace
    Slime claims that their sealant is CO2-friendly, haven't been able to test it though, since I've never used CO2.


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  26. #26
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    When my jug of Trucker's runs out I'll maybe try one of the new ones

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