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  1. #1
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    Biking Photography Survey!

    Hello! I am an Industrial design student and I am looking for feedback from the biking community. I am researching the design opportunities and possibilities of a new type of camera bag for your bike. I have created a survey with 10 questions and it would really help me out if you followed the link below!

    https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/VBGKHTH

    I have been a mountian/bikepacker for a number of years and have always struggled with feeling comfortable bringing my dslr camera on my rides. With this project I am hoping to find a way to help bikers incorporate their photography passion/hobby.


    All feedback is appreciated, I want this product to be one that is design with specific mtb needs in mind. Please feel free with to reply back with additional input not covered by the survey.

  2. #2
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    Done

  3. #3
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    That was easy!

    Good luck on your project.
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    Done.

  5. #5
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    Thank you all for the responses that I have gotten thus far! This bike bag will be focused on negating vibration and water damage to DSLR cameras. The survey is still open and if you bike with a camera I am still collecting input!

    In the following months once this product is developed I plan on posting the results back to this forum.*

    If you have any additional comments or suggestions don't hesitate to PM me.*

  6. #6
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    Done.
    I hate to say it, but smart phone cameras are pretty decent these days.... And probably 99% of riders aren't going to take advantage of a high end DSLR are they?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    Done.
    I hate to say it, but smart phone cameras are pretty decent these days.... And probably 99% of riders aren't going to take advantage of a high end DSLR are they?
    x 1 million.

    I have yet to see even a single soul on the trail lugging around a DSLR. My daughter's iPhone XS Max is ridiculously impressive.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for taking the survey! And generally you would be correct. For bikers or even photographers who just want to go on a quick single track ride are not typically interested in toting their heavy cameras. However, for photographers there will never be a replacement for the quality and control their dslrs provide. Rides who have a project in mind or bike packers who want to document experience in full don't currently have a solid option on the market for a camera bag that is not a camera backpack.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by motobegone View Post
    Thanks for taking the survey! And generally you would be correct. For bikers or even photographers who just want to go on a quick single track ride are not typically interested in toting their heavy cameras. However, for photographers there will never be a replacement for the quality and control their dslrs provide. Rides who have a project in mind or bike packers who want to document experience in full don't currently have a solid option on the market for a camera bag that is not a camera backpack.
    Don't guys who do this have sherpas and minions who carry their gear?

    I may be wrong, but it seems to me that few biking enthusiasts (which is the demographic of this forum) are out, primarily, to shoot photos. They are out to ride, and capture some of the moments easily, quickly and painlessly. A decent phone and a GoPro pretty much nail this objective.

    Perhaps a more photography oriented forum would be a better target for your survey.

    PS - most guys here are not doing quick single track rides, and most would not even think about carrying a DSLR on an epic ride (or even a short one for that matter). A bigger issue these days is the opposite - how to ride packless.

    All that said, perhaps you should cross post this in the photography and bikepacking sub forums here.

  10. #10
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    This is a fairly shit survey from a data analysis perspective. I did it because why not.
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  11. #11
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    I ride with a Nikon Coolpix Point &Shoot strapped across my shoulder. I've had it for 3 years, it's waterproof and robust. I don't have to carry any attachments etc. I don't require a special bike bag to carry it. I did the survey
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  12. #12
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    Done.

    As much as I like good pictures, riding with a DLSR is just too much. I love using my go-pro set to take pictures at intervals, on my bar, or head, or chest, I turn it "on" for a while or during key times during the ride, heck sometimes when we are just hanging out. Inevitably I get a bunch of cool pictures that I sort out when I get home. This is great because it's hands-off, I can enjoy the ride, nothing expensive and exposed to break, etc. DSLR is nice, but too bulky for serious/hard riding and I have no want to carry one. I think that's more for the photo-passion people, but technology constantly steps closer and closer to that quality and function at a fraction of the price for the quality that most of us would ever get out of it.

    Everyone tends to think the action cams are just for shooting video, but the ability to take pictures every few seconds is my favorite thing. Videos are sometimes hard to produce, don't always work right, and memory intensive, but when taking interval shots you always catch some stuff that is great.

    Biking Photography Survey!-g0189099.jpgBiking Photography Survey!-img_4583s.jpgBiking Photography Survey!-11012493_10100659363517418_6125996622646942412_o.jpgBiking Photography Survey!-image.jpg
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Done.

    As much as I like good pictures, riding with a DLSR is just too much. I love using my go-pro set to take pictures at intervals, on my bar, or head, or chest, I turn it "on" for a while or during key times during the ride, heck sometimes when we are just hanging out. Inevitably I get a bunch of cool pictures that I sort out when I get home. This is great because it's hands-off, I can enjoy the ride, nothing expensive and exposed to break, etc. DSLR is nice, but too bulky for serious/hard riding and I have no want to carry one. I think that's more for the photo-passion people, but technology constantly steps closer and closer to that quality and function at a fraction of the price for the quality that most of us would ever get out of it.

    Everyone tends to think the action cams are just for shooting video, but the ability to take pictures every few seconds is my favorite thing. Videos are sometimes hard to produce, don't always work right, and memory intensive, but when taking interval shots you always catch some stuff that is great.

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    Those are sweet pics.

    I sometimes use my GoPro in the manner you mentioned, but I can just as easily get great pics from the video footage. And of course, I still have the video footage intact as well. Not sure of the downside to doing this (except you need storage and batteries to run video nonstop).

    I'm with you though. I refuse to let my GoPro or even photography with my phone overtake the primary objective of riding. I try to let it interfere with the stoke as little as possible. Turn it on and let it run until the end of the ride (pics or video).

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Those are sweet pics.

    I sometimes use my GoPro in the manner you mentioned, but I can just as easily get great pics from the video footage. And of course, I still have the video footage intact as well. Not sure of the downside to doing this (except you need storage and batteries to run video nonstop).
    Yeah, my battery life can be at a premium in the colder temps, I have a few ways to circumvent that, but shooting video just takes up a lot of mem and battery so that's why I tend to not shoot as much straight video.

    I think technology is steadily getting better and better with the various cams for practical photos for the non-photo nerds.
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  15. #15
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    My son has a DSLR and I bought him a camera backpack for it. Bag has enough room for the camera and a few other essentials besides. He won't take it on his bike though, says his phone is fine.

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    I do a lot of "gigs" and have Nikon D500 and couple of pro lenses at home. I don't bring them to my ride for the obvious reasons. Instead, I have my Olympus OMD EM10 mark II mirrorless camera with me. I would either put a 25 f1.8 lens or a standard zoom. I can easily fit the camera in my holster bag, which is about 7x6x4 inches in size. As a bonus, the holster even has enough room for one inner tube, tire levers, and a multi tools. I bring my camera to my ride in order to document my adventure. I am not trying to capture some rare scenery. I need to capture something interest and quickly pack up and go. If you want to design a backpack, it should have be a hydration pack with room for photo gear. I don't use a hydration pack because I am doing loops in my local trails.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Don't guys who do this have sherpas and minions who carry their gear?

    I may be wrong, but it seems to me that few biking enthusiasts (which is the demographic of this forum) are out, primarily, to shoot photos. They are out to ride, and capture some of the moments easily, quickly and painlessly. A decent phone and a GoPro pretty much nail this objective.

    Perhaps a more photography oriented forum would be a better target for your survey.

    PS - most guys here are not doing quick single track rides, and most would not even think about carrying a DSLR on an epic ride (or even a short one for that matter). A bigger issue these days is the opposite - how to ride packless.

    All that said, perhaps you should cross post this in the photography and bikepacking sub forums here.

    For the type of shooting you mentioned, Lowepro did make one...Yeah, most of us ride for fun, not chasing a certain specific scene in locations only accessible by foot or bikes.

    https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...rt_bp_300.html

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    x 1 million.

    I have yet to see even a single soul on the trail lugging around a DSLR. My daughter's iPhone XS Max is ridiculously impressive.
    - 1 million.

    I've seen, and ridden with, a bunch of folks on the trail lugging around DSLRs. It's not a big deal. You just plop it in a larger hydropack.

    Also, smart phone cameras are not ridiculously impressive compared to DSLRs for MTB photography. For many reasons.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    DSLR is nice, but too bulky for serious/hard riding
    That may be your opinion but many folks who ride with DSLRs don't find them to be too bulky. Even on "serious/hard/rides."

  20. #20
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    Oh Iphone photos?? I will pass that..

    Few shots from yesterday...with my Olympus OMD EM10 mark II and Olympus 25mm F1.8...The kit will set you back about $500...









  21. #21
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    For me mountain biking with a camera its going to have to be on my back.
    Bike packing/touring/gravel ride type of thing I would want a bar bag and probably some fork leg storage

    I went mirrorless with smaller/slower lenses just to make it more portable... The size and weight of my dslrs and large aperture lenses was too much (I use Nikon D4/D5 bodies and 24-70 2.8, 70-200 2.8 and long primes for work) The AF isn't as good and the battery life is pretty weak but what the mirrorless lacks it more than makes up for in size and weight.

  22. #22
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    I'll let you guess what camera

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

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    Hope

    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    I'll let you guess what camera

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
    Nice Pictures! I would say a non-iPhone smartphone camera??
    You're really making that fat bike work for you huh? Looks like a lot of snow riding!

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by motobegone View Post
    Nice Pictures! I would say a non-iPhone smartphone camera??
    You're really making that fat bike work for you huh? Looks like a lot of snow riding!
    Unfortunately, even photos from your Iphone 5 would look great in this small size resolution. Try to view them at 5000 pixel resolution.... For some reasons, MTBR won't enlarge the shots....

  25. #25
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    I think tapatalk messed with the resolution on upload.
    But just a Samsung Galaxy

    I guess what I'm getting at, I'd be more inclined to stop for a photo knowing it'll only take 5-10 seconds to snap a pic with the phone vs messing with a big heavy camera/lens .
    Most of us aren't enlarging the shots to print posters.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    Most of us aren't enlarging the shots to print posters.
    That makes sense if folks only use DSLRs because they want to print posters.

    The reality is quite different.

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    Quote Originally Posted by og-mtb View Post
    That makes sense if folks only use DSLRs because they want to print posters.

    The reality is quite different.
    Print?? Hahahahaha....I do a lot of gigs and no..people didn't hire me to shoot so that they can print photos. They want hi res photos they can use to promote their sports or teams. I regularly put 1800 to 2500 pixel resolution photos on my FB accounts. Nowadays, people are using 24" to 27" monitors. Why would they want to look at small resolution photos? It only takes me few minutes to get my shots using my Olympus mirrorless camera. Why would one need few sec to do it when the scene isn't going anywhere quick. And when you need to spend few minute to think and compose your photos.... If you just want snap something for the sake of snap something..of course, you don't need to spend few hundred dollars on a more capable camera kit....

  28. #28
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    I have a mirrorless camera (Panasonic GH2), which I used to take on some adventures, but now it's almost always left behind in favor of my Pixel 2 unless I need the telephoto lens. I liked the ergonomics of the GH2, but it is just too much of a hassle to take it and lenses when 90% of the time, my phone does just as good a job (and some of those other times, the phone does better).

    If I was specifically going to take photos, I understand taking a dedicated camera (and maybe even a DSLR, though mirrorless has gotten pretty damn good at a smaller size), but even then, I think I would just take a camera backpack.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    ...I guess what I'm getting at, I'd be more inclined to stop for a photo knowing it'll only take 5-10 seconds to snap a pic with the phone vs messing with a big heavy camera/lens...
    I have to think that a sizeable proportion of the riding public is with you on that. In 25 years of riding I have never once witnessed a DSLR photo shoot going down on the trails. Of course it happens, but it seems to me that that is on the fringe of an already fringe demographic.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    I have to think that a sizeable proportion of the riding public is with you on that. In 25 years of riding I have never once witnessed a DSLR photo shoot going down on the trails. Of course it happens, but it seems to me that that is on the fringe of an already fringe demographic.
    Well, 25 years ago, DSLR or digital photography was at its infancy. Mirrorless camera didn't come into the scene until 4 years ago. There was no smart phones either. Not sure what you were implying....

    Let's put it this way..the Iphone X is bigger than my Olympus OMD em10 mark II... If you can bring your Iphone X with you on your ride, you can bring a micro 4/3 mirrorless camera system. Let's face it....not all MTBers are photographers and know how to take photos. Many just settle with iphone photos that's because they know little about photography...not because iphone photos can replace photos taken with a capable camera....

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    Let's cut straight to the chase. Are you trying to suggest that there is anything but a small proportion of mountain bikers who are shooting photos mid ride with a DSLR?

    I am not saying it's good. Or bad. What I am saying is that I suspect that nothing greater than a small pocket of riders do this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Let's cut straight to the chase. Are you trying to suggest that there is anything but a small proportion of mountain bikers who are shooting photos mid ride with a DSLR?

    I am not saying it's good. Or bad. What I am saying is that I suspect that nothing greater than a small pocket of riders do this.
    Me and Ray Lee are photogs...we are both FM members (a photography forum message board). I shoot with a mirrorless camera. He does the same thing too. There.... For the fact you didn't notice the trend in your 25 years of MTBing because DSLR or digital photography didn't pickup until the last 8 years or so. Your riding experience didn't mean anything here. It proves nothing....

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    Quote Originally Posted by SingleSpeed73 View Post
    Me and Ray Lee are photogs...we are both FM members (a photography forum message board). I shoot with a mirrorless camera. He does the same thing too. There.... For the fact you didn't notice the trend in your 25 years of MTBing because DSLR or digital photography didn't pickup until the last 8 years or so. Your riding experience didn't mean anything here. It proves nothing....
    Are you drunk?

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Are you drunk?
    I am fine..thanks for asking..

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    Let me guess...you can bring your ipad-like Iphone X but not this little micro 4/3 system to the trail...because it is too heavy and bulky??? If you go for the Panasonic Lumix system with a rangefinder layout, you can even get a slimmer micro 4/3 system profile.


    Biking Photography Survey!-glacier_ridge_0015.jpg

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    Look at this Sony A6000 with 24mp with a DSLR crop sensor size!!!!! You are getting DSLR image quality and dynamic range with a camera body size smaller than your Iphone X!!!!!

    https://www.amazon.com/Sony-Mirrorle.../dp/B00I8BICB2

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    Quote Originally Posted by SingleSpeed73 View Post
    For the fact you didn't notice the trend in your 25 years of MTBing because DSLR or digital photography didn't pickup until the last 8 years or so.
    Where did that crazy idea come from?

    Digital circa 2000

    Biking Photography Survey!-render-2153.jpg

    DSLR circa 2002

    Biking Photography Survey!-render-1166.jpg

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    Crazy? Not at all....... The demise of film or analog photography didn't happen until digital photography becomes a trend some 10 years ago+. When DSLR is affordable...I say it began when 6mp to 8mp were the norms back in the days. That was when I had my Canon Rebel XTI.... It does not count when 3 mp DSLR costed more than $3k...and only photojournalists and rich hobbyists were using them...... FYI, I started shooting more than 10 years ago....

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    Quote Originally Posted by SingleSpeed73 View Post
    Crazy? Not at all....... The demise of film or analog photography didn't happen until digital photography becomes a trend some 10 years ago+. When DSLR is affordable...I say it began when 6mp to 8mp were the norms back in the days. That was when I had my Canon Rebel XTI.... It does not count when 3 mp DSLR costed more than $3k...and only photojournalists and rich hobbyists were using them......
    Yes. Crazy.

    The digital camera that I used for the first photo was ~$1,000 but cost has nothing to do with the falsity of your crazy claim ("DSLR or digital photography didn't pickup until the last 8 years or so"). Many other mountain bikers were also shooting digital in 2000 and they weren't "photojournalists or rich hobbyists."

    Quote Originally Posted by SingleSpeed73 View Post
    FYI, I started shooting more than 10 years ago....
    And? Am I supposed to be impressed or something? What's the big deal?

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    Digital photography wasn't a trend back in year 2000. Film still ruled. Photography was still related to shooting in film. No one would expect to be shooting in digital if they wanted to buy a camera. That's why. I know what I am talking about, that's what. Regardless, none of these would have anything to do with why people are shooting with Iphones.

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    Quote Originally Posted by og-mtb View Post
    Yes. Crazy.

    The digital camera that I used for the first photo was ~$1,000 but cost has nothing to do with the falsity of your crazy claim ("DSLR or digital photography didn't pickup until the last 8 years or so"). Many other mountain bikers were also shooting digital in 2000 and they weren't "photojournalists or rich hobbyists."



    And? Am I supposed to be impressed or something? What's the big deal?
    This was written in 2006, not 2000...impressed you should..

    "The push to digital is not confined to Nikon. According to Kodak "For all of 2005, digital sales represented 54% of total revenue, marking the first time in the company's history that digital revenue exceeded traditional." That info highlights their financial report dated January 30th."


    https://www.nyip.edu/photo-articles/cameras-and-gear/the-end-of-film-photography





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    Quote Originally Posted by SingleSpeed73 View Post
    Digital photography wasn't a trend back in year 2000. Film still ruled. Photography was still related to shooting in film. No one would expect to be shooting in digital if they wanted to buy a camera.
    Absolutely crazy. I lived through those times. Bought three digital point and shoot cameras - then bought a DSLR in 2001.

    Digital cameras absolutely were a trend that could be observed right here on MTBR as many folks bought digital cameras and posted those pictures rather than continue to shoot film and scan prints.

    Example, see all of those camera icons? Those posts contained digital photos:

    https://web.archive.org/web/20010107...es/506770.html (image links broken after MTBR migrated their hosting server years ago)

    Re: your Kodak quote - they missed the digital trend by many years and the article focuses on the pro market.

    In no way does that article support your crazy claim that "DSLR or digital photography didn't pickup until the last 8 years or so." Since 2003 digital cameras have outsold film cameras. 2003. 15 years ago.

  43. #43
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    Seems like it was about 8 years ago when digital cameras started losing market share to phones.


    Regardless, I take pictures to remember riding my bike. I don't ride my bike to take pictures. Camera phone is fine.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    Seems like it was about 8 years ago when digital cameras started losing market share to phones.


    Regardless, I take pictures to remember riding my bike. I don't ride my bike to take pictures. Camera phone is fine.
    Thatís where I am at as well.

    As for the DSLR timeline, I bought a Canon 300D in 2003. I still own it. That has been lots of fun over the years.

    I am not against nice cameras. I will check out some of the mirrorless options mentioned in this thread. But for biking, my phone and GoPro, to capture some of the moments, are more than adequate. And totally non-intrusive and non-distracting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    And totally non-intrusive and non-distracting.
    For you.

    What you seem to repeatedly not be able to understand (see gimbal discussion) is what seems to be a "hassle," or "intrusive," or "distracting" for you is simply no big deal to other folks (or "cork sniffers' as you like to disparagingly like to call folks who can use, and appreciate, higher quality gear).

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    Quote Originally Posted by og-mtb View Post
    For you.

    What you seem to repeatedly not be able to understand (see gimbal discussion) is what seems to be a "hassle," or "intrusive," or "distracting" for you is simply no big deal to other folks (or "cork sniffers' as you like to disparagingly like to call folks who can use, and appreciate, higher quality gear).
    Whatever dude. Say what you want but it's a small portion of bikers who see the benefit of lugging around a DSLR on rides. Quit trying to represent what is very much an outlier position, as one that is mainstream.

    Do what you want. Bring a film crew for all I care.

    As for appreciation for high quality gear, trust me, after what I spent on biking-related gear in 2018, I think I need an intervention.

    There is no lack of appreciation at my end.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Whatever dude. Say what you want but it's a small portion of bikers who see the benefit of lugging around a DSLR on rides. Quit trying to represent what is very much an outlier position, as one that is mainstream.
    Please pay attention.

    I never claimed riding with a DSLR is mainstream.

    I merely replied to your "I have yet to see even a single soul on the trail lugging around a DSLR" claim and your subsequent "intrusive" and "distracting" justifications for only riding with a lower level of gear (your bike gear/camera gear false equivalency notwithstanding).

  48. #48
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    It'll be interesting to see if something can come of this. There are most certainly people that bring DSLRs on rides, but as a small population, deciding where to put it on the bike can isolate even more of those people, like the front triangle on a hardtail may be nice, but that only works for a hardtail, or you might already have a small seat bag that you use and would have to re-located, etc. I think technology is rapidly making the reasons to carry a DSLR obsolete, but as long as there's a market for them, there'll hopefully be a market for people looking for a better way to carry them.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  49. #49
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    I'd probably say things are leaning towards mirror-less rather than DSLR. Sony RX100 or their A series gets you pretty close at considerably smaller size and weight.
    I'm a bit the same. I often have a couple of GoPros on me or the bike, but sometimes just want to ride rather than faff with them.
    I should try the stills option, see how they turn out. Though I tend to ride under tree cover so I'm unlikely to get the kind of landscapes above.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mudguard View Post
    I'd probably say things are leaning towards mirror-less rather than DSLR. Sony RX100 or their A series gets you pretty close at considerably smaller size and weight.
    I'm a bit the same. I often have a couple of GoPros on me or the bike, but sometimes just want to ride rather than faff with them.
    I should try the stills option, see how they turn out. Though I tend to ride under tree cover so I'm unlikely to get the kind of landscapes above.
    Inspired by this thread, I read about mirrorless cameras last night. I was pretty shocked to see the cost of the ones that were recommended were all well into 4 figures. And then there is the glass...

    I came sooooooooo close to using a drone this year. I actually bought one. But I just couldn't fathom the thought of spending time effing around with something like this mid-ride. My GoPro is bad enough. I returned the drone and have never looked back.

    All that said, I would appreciate it if any of the camera buffs on here (who aren't completely pissed at me) could recommend a couple of good bang for the buck mirrorless cameras, that I can read up on and maybe purchase to cut my teeth on.

    Thanks.

  51. #51
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    I ride with a DSLR about half the time. If I had a better pack I'd do it more.

    I do several long traverse/bikepack trips every year, and I always take a DSLR on those.

    For day rides I use this:

    https://www.thinktankphoto.com/colle...ation180-trail

    It's OK. Quick draw/stash of the camera is the main reason, and it's really good for that. Pretty cheap, too.

    But as far as features for MTB'ing, ergonomics, etc... it's a POS.

    I'd like to see something like ^ that pack, with size options such that I could keep a bigger lens on the body at all times, as well as with better ergonomics, organization, etc...

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by SingleSpeed73 View Post
    Look at this Sony A6000 with 24mp with a DSLR crop sensor size!!!!! You are getting DSLR image quality and dynamic range with a camera body size smaller than your Iphone X!!!!!

    https://www.amazon.com/Sony-Mirrorle.../dp/B00I8BICB2
    For a bang for your buck mirrorless, this Sony looks good so far.

    Question - I have a bunch of Canon glass from my oooooold 300D. I assume it is not usable with the current crop of Canon mirrorless cameras. Or is it?

    Also, given the responses above, I take it that there is no issue with the durability of the cameras with all the trail pounding, assuming no crashes, if carried in a back pack of one sort or another, correct?

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    For a bang for your buck mirrorless, this Sony looks good so far.

    Question - I have a bunch of Canon glass from my oooooold 300D. I assume it is not usable with the current crop of Canon mirrorless cameras. Or is it?

    Also, given the responses above, I take it that there is no issue with the durability of the cameras with all the trail pounding, assuming no crashes, if carried in a back pack of one sort or another, correct?
    Well, here is a brief write up on the mirrorless camera technology. The idea is that if you remove the reflex mirror in the camera, you can make the body smaller. Sensor size would affect the size of the lens. Each manufacturer has their own proprietary lens mount format. Lens for DSLR can only be used on these mirrorless system by using a separate adapter. However, you will lose auto focus and aperture controls. These lenses could only be used and exposed using manual controls only.

    Fortunately, many of the today's mirrorless system can be had under $500 to $600 and they come with a kit lens. Not the fastest f1.8 or faster but they will do the job. Many of them are called the pancake lens because when retracted, you can literally put the entire kit inside a big pocket. I can put my Olympus OMD EM10 mark II + the pancake kit lens inside my cycling jersey back pockets. Only Olympus and Panasonic Lumix lineup are offering 4/3 sensor system. Lenses from both manufacturers are interchangeable. For Fuji, Sony, Nikon, and Canon, they offer both full frame and crop sensors format. Sony system would always have a smaller footprint but their user interface isn't intuitive and camera options are very often buried inside their menu system.

    Many of the mirrorless system have excellent video recording with in body image stabilization and the newer models have 4k video as well. However, they aren't great to be used as action cams (assuming if you can mount them ON you). And the video recording has a time limit of 29 minutes...because there is a law restricting these still cameras to record only 29 minutes...otherwise, they would be taxed as video cameras...not still cameras.

    Obviously, if you are a photographer and someone who loves and knows about photography, the mirrorless system is the way to go to document and capture your MTBing adventure.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Question - I have a bunch of Canon glass from my oooooold 300D. I assume it is not usable with the current crop of Canon mirrorless cameras. Or is it?
    Yes, via an adapter. All the lens functions remain, the adapter is more or less just a spacer, with electrical contacts to preserve lens function. This is true for both the M and R systems.
    I'm looking forward to regretting this.......

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnyspoke View Post
    Yes, via an adapter. All the lens functions remain, the adapter is more or less just a spacer, with electrical contacts to preserve lens function. This is true for both the M and R systems.
    Wow. So with the adaptor, my old glass from my 2003 300D would be compatible with this?

    https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canon-eos-m100-review

    Any downsize to using the adaptor? Cost? Size? Weight?

    I think I may have found a new rabbit hole I can go down...

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Wow. So with the adaptor, my old my glass from my 2003 300D would be compatible with this?

    https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canon-eos-m100-review

    Any downsize to using the adaptor? Cost? Size? Weight?


    I think I ma have found a new rabbit hole I can go down...
    This should work only if you want to retain AF and automatic exposure control...https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...apter_Kit.html

    Unfortunately, considering your lenses are somewhat dated and old, they may not be able to match the sensor resolution of the m100. You may want to spend the money to get this instead..it would make the size even smaller...

    https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...22_mm_f_2.html

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Lee View Post
    For me mountain biking with a camera its going to have to be on my back.
    Bike packing/touring/gravel ride type of thing I would want a bar bag and probably some fork leg storage

    I went mirrorless with smaller/slower lenses just to make it more portable... The size and weight of my dslrs and large aperture lenses was too much (I use Nikon D4/D5 bodies and 24-70 2.8, 70-200 2.8 and long primes for work) The AF isn't as good and the battery life is pretty weak but what the mirrorless lacks it more than makes up for in size and weight.
    I was wondering where I saw your shots..now I know...yeah, I kind of know Moe and one of his close friend too, Rob...

    https://www.facebook.com/MoEHPDE/pho...type=3&theater

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    I ride with a DSLR about half the time. If I had a better pack I'd do it more.

    I do several long traverse/bikepack trips every year, and I always take a DSLR on those.

    For day rides I use this:

    https://www.thinktankphoto.com/colle...ation180-trail

    It's OK. Quick draw/stash of the camera is the main reason, and it's really good for that. Pretty cheap, too.

    But as far as features for MTB'ing, ergonomics, etc... it's a POS.

    I'd like to see something like ^ that pack, with size options such that I could keep a bigger lens on the body at all times, as well as with better ergonomics, organization, etc...

    Im in the same boat. I know its somewhat of a sacrifice to ride with a DSLR but I enjoy the more remote and scenic locations you can get to by bike. I currently ride with a cannon 60D, I ride with a camera backpack that says it offers some sort of impact resistance, but is bigger and bulkier then I would like. I had previously done some reading on the backpack you had mentioned but didn't want to spend more money on something that I knew wasn't purpose built for riding and wouldn't 100% fit my needs. That is how I became interested with this whole project. Im looking for a solution that is not a backpack due to the extra strain on bikers bodies/balance issues.

    Im curious about your opinions/concerns about a bike mounted bag.

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    It'll be interesting to see if something can come of this. There are most certainly people that bring DSLRs on rides, but as a small population, deciding where to put it on the bike can isolate even more of those people, like the front triangle on a hardtail may be nice, but that only works for a hardtail, or you might already have a small seat bag that you use and would have to re-located, etc. I think technology is rapidly making the reasons to carry a DSLR obsolete, but as long as there's a market for them, there'll hopefully be a market for people looking for a better way to carry them.
    I'm with you! I have gotten very good feedback and insight from this thread and on my survey (rudimentary as it was). Due to all the interest/controversy from these replies I plan on keeping this forum updated on the final design.

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