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  1. #1
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    best cities for mtb-ers?

    What are the best cities for mtb-ers? This would include cities with good mtb trails as well as cities where you're likely to commonly encounter people with a positive mtb-er vibe.

  2. #2
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    The Asheville area.

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    You're going to get biased answers. The fact is, there are many great cities for mountain biking in United States.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AVL-MTB View Post
    You're going to get biased answers. The fact is, there are many great cities for mountain biking in United States.
    Donít forget about your brothers to the north...

    https://m.pinkbike.com/news/east-of-...mountains.html


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    Boston, MA.

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    Bentonville AR. There's a full time paid trail maintenance team and builders. Riding practically all year round, even when it's damp or even a little wet. And probably the coolest folks on bikes I've ever met. People there just want to ride and have fun.

    I live a few hours north of Bentonvile, and the trails are great. But there's a gatekeeper mentality that's a little off putting. More so than any other cities and towns I've ridden in.
    I no longer like to party. But I like the idea of it.

  7. #7
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    Vancouver, BC
    Steamboat Springs, CO
    Bellingham, WA
    Moab, UT
    Bentonville, AR
    Sedona, AZ

    To name a few. 100s more could and should be mentioned most likely.

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    Hereís a list for ya. Do I agree with them all, no. But itís a list.

    This list is also contingent on bicycle friendly bike lanes in town.


    https://www.outsideonline.com/189990...ide-bike-towns

    best cities for mtb-ers?-e6070b17-4377-4c8f-8e7a-e7ab2f7fb54d.jpeg
    best cities for mtb-ers?-023f4443-8752-43bb-92c2-e90633aa037f.jpg
    best cities for mtb-ers?-ec67f45f-d5ee-44b4-9177-08ac53c87898.jpeg
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    best cities for mtb-ers?-710323f0-cba1-4811-9d5a-35935bb299c4.jpeg
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  9. #9
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    I think any question like this needs to have criteria.

    1. Size. Population centre bigger than 40,000.
    2. Minimum of 100 miles of single track within riding distance.
    3. Pedigree. A professional mountain biker needs to either have grown up there or currently lives there.
    4. Kids. Must have an active kids mountain bike program.
    5. Variety. Must have trails that are fun on an XC bike and trails that are best on a DH bike.

    If we restrict it to the US then I would have to say Bellingham or Prescott. If you add Canada there is a lot that fits the mold, but Kamloops or Kelowna are top in my opinion.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

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    Depends what you like and how you feel about crowds. IMO, the best "city" for mountain bikers is the one that hasn't yet been discovered and blown up. Kinda like Fruita in the mid to late 90s.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LMN View Post
    If we restrict it to the US then I would have to say Bellingham or Prescott.
    Prescott as in Prescott, AZ? Miles and miles of XC trails there nothing that is best on a DH bike. I would say that Flagstaff fits your criteria better.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Hereís a list for ya. Do I agree with them all, no. But itís a list.

    This list is also contingent on bicycle friendly bike lanes in town.

    https://www.outsideonline.com/189990...ide-bike-towns
    Might want to scratch Chico, CA off that list for a while. Just heard a story this AM on the radio about how Chico has turned into a total crap show since nearby Paradise burned to the ground. Chico apparently has taken in over 20,000 refugees from the Camp Fire and they supposedly had a housing shortage before that.

    Didn't sound like you could move there even if you wanted to.
    No dig no whine

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    Quote Originally Posted by rynomx785 View Post
    Prescott as in Prescott, AZ? Miles and miles of XC trails there nothing that is best on a DH bike. I would say that Flagstaff fits your criteria better.
    I've ridden only Shultz Pass in Flagstaff and if the rest of the trails there are anything like Schultz Pass, I'd venture to say it'd be one of the best MTB towns in the US. Better than Sedona, which I have also ridden.
    I no longer like to party. But I like the idea of it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 410sprint View Post
    The Asheville area.
    no way. total dump. nobody wants to live here - er - there.

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    While I like Madison, I wouldn't have it on this list. There isn't enough dirt singletrack to support a top 10 mtb acknowledgement. Yes, I know the list is a general "Bike" friendly list and in that regard, Madison rocks. But not for singletrack.

    I'd give honorable mentions to: Colorado Springs, Bentonville AR, and St. Louis (gasp). Part of my endorsement of StL stems from this is where I fell in love with mtb'ing 30 yrs ago, after a 25yr hiatus I moved back, there tons of great trails, and within driving distance of Ozark trails, Brown County, and Bentonville. Check out Gorctrails.com for 411 on the singletrack. Also, the StL cycling community is in a word, awesome.

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    I would be looking for the city with the least amount of riders so I could have all of the trials to myself

    I am in the minority in that I don't think that packed trails/parking lots at trail heads are a good thing. Sometimes bigger/overpopulated does not actually mean better...in fact it usually doesn't.

    To me, Lake Placid is a great MTB tons b/c there are a few decent bike shops, tons of places to ride, cold weather, and not a lot of people around...probably some other towns like that in NE/upper Michigan/Minnesota ets
    " ...the moonlit swamp Krampus is a king among bikes." - geraldooka

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    Quote Originally Posted by LMN View Post
    I think any question like this needs to have criteria.

    1. Size. Population centre bigger than 40,000.
    2. Minimum of 100 miles of single track within riding distance.
    3. Pedigree. A professional mountain biker needs to either have grown up there or currently lives there.
    4. Kids. Must have an active kids mountain bike program.
    5. Variety. Must have trails that are fun on an XC bike and trails that are best on a DH bike.

    If we restrict it to the US then I would have to say Bellingham or Prescott. If you add Canada there is a lot that fits the mold, but Kamloops or Kelowna are top in my opinion.
    6.Affordability.
    Good luck with Steamboat, Crested Butte or Boulder, etc.

    Also wasn't Colorado Springs ranked the most dangerous small city in the US recently?...or highest crime or something?
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    ...Also wasn't Colorado Springs ranked the most dangerous small city in the US recently?...or highest crime or something?
    Not sure, although I did enjoy BlacKkKlansman.

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    Quote Originally Posted by almazing View Post
    I've ridden only Shultz Pass in Flagstaff and if the rest of the trails there are anything like Schultz Pass, I'd venture to say it'd be one of the best MTB towns in the US. Better than Sedona, which I have also ridden.
    Did you ride Schultz Creek or the Schultz Creek AZT section?

    Flag does have some awesome riding. Starting at the top of Elden, there is a lot of really cool DH trails. Some of it gets pretty steep and rowdy.

    Not sure I would say it is better than Sedona but definitely different. Better gravity focused trails in Flag for sure but Sedona is still a lot of fun.

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    Everyone is different.
    For me:
    Size: smaller is better, with access to a larger town.
    Kid's programs: We are empty nesters.
    Pedigree: ?
    Affordable: not an issue.
    Access to international flights: big, for us.
    Variety: We're spoiled with over 400 miles of trails and 4.5 hours to Moab.
    Must have good skiing.

    Except for the airport access, and proximity to a large town, Crested Butte would be at the top of my list.

    For us, Park City, Utah.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rynomx785 View Post
    Prescott as in Prescott, AZ? Miles and miles of XC trails there nothing that is best on a DH bike. I would say that Flagstaff fits your criteria better.
    Prescott is actually pretty good for Mtn bike Base. Sure lots of great XC miles and no so much DH stuff, but if you want tech there is the dells. If you want Flagstaff it is a short drive. If you want Sedona it is a short drive. Desert riding is a 1 hour drive. Plus right now it is snowing in flag and trails are useless. However it just raining in Prescott with some area getting snow no doubt, but should be ride able in a couple days. Flagstaff is down for 3 more months at least.

    It is very hard to have one single place be everything to everyone 365 days a year. This why a "best City' is really not reasonable. Too much depends on your individual desires and needs.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by LMN View Post
    I think any question like this needs to have criteria.

    1. Size. Population centre bigger than 40,000.
    2. Minimum of 100 miles of single track within riding distance.
    3. Pedigree. A professional mountain biker needs to either have grown up there or currently lives there.
    4. Kids. Must have an active kids mountain bike program.
    5. Variety. Must have trails that are fun on an XC bike and trails that are best on a DH bike.

    If we restrict it to the US then I would have to say Bellingham or Prescott. If you add Canada there is a lot that fits the mold, but Kamloops or Kelowna are top in my opinion.
    Are these your personal criteria, or criteria you think should be general ones for this question?

    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    6.Affordability.
    I think criteria for the question are important. I think the first one should be to decide if we're talking about the best mtb cities to VISIT, or the best ones to LIVE IN. Everything else is going to follow from that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    Prescott is actually pretty good for Mtn bike Base. Sure lots of great XC miles and no so much DH stuff, but if you want tech there is the dells. If you want Flagstaff it is a short drive. If you want Sedona it is a short drive. Desert riding is a 1 hour drive. Plus right now it is snowing in flag and trails are useless. However it just raining in Prescott with some area getting snow no doubt, but should be ride able in a couple days. Flagstaff is down for 3 more months at least.

    It is very hard to have one single place be everything to everyone 365 days a year. This why a "best City' is really not reasonable. Too much depends on your individual desires and needs.
    Don't get me wrong, Prescott has a lot of fun trails and the Dells are awesome but, in regards to the best riding that AZ has to offer, it is not in Prescott IMO. Definitely a good centered location to call home in regards to riding bikes though for sure.

    What Prescott also has going for it is a Parks and Rec Manager that is an avid MTBer. He wants to make Prescott a renowned MTB destination. I was told by a friend of mine that personally knows the manager that they are planning on building some designated DH trails on Glassford Hill. He would also like to build a bike park but the funding for it has not been worked out yet. Fingers crossed it all works out as I am only an hour South of Prescott.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    ...I think criteria for the question are important. I think the first one should be to decide if we're talking about the best mtb cities to VISIT, or the best ones to LIVE IN. Everything else is going to follow from that.
    Agreed 100%.

    My future retirement plans have changed dramatically. I was just beginning the process of readying myself for this. My plans were to move to another location at some point in the future. During a western Canada biking tour this summer (where I visited the location I thought I would like to end up in), I concluded that I love where I live. I have everything I want and need right here. World class biking, skiing and city life. Is it perfect? Nope. I could definitely do without winter. But I think it is a great home base. I can travel regularly elsewhere, whenever I want (including during the cold snaps).

  25. #25
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    Bellingham for sure. You are around the corner from Whistler and you can ride Galbraith Mountain every day for the rest of your life. I'm trying to convince my wife that we need to move up there from the Seattle-Tacoma area but it's not working...yet. I think she is on to me.
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    Quote Originally Posted by almazing View Post
    Bentonville AR. There's a full time paid trail maintenance team and builders. Riding practically all year round, even when it's damp or even a little wet. And probably the coolest folks on bikes I've ever met. People there just want to ride and have fun.

    I live a few hours north of Bentonvile, and the trails are great. But there's a gatekeeper mentality that's a little off putting. More so than any other cities and towns I've ridden in.
    Oppressively hot in the summer, but I fully recommend people go there! And Dallas too!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Oppressively hot in the summer, but I fully recommend people go there! And Dallas too!
    I would actually agree that summer is our "worst" month for riding. I pretty much finish all my rides prior to noon during the summer, then hit a body of water afterwards for the remainder of the day.

  28. #28
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    Blah, blah, blah blah. We all desire different qualities to the ďperfectĒ place to live. Too many great places to list. Even the people who write the ď10 bestĒ articles come up short. If you can afford to live anywhere you want then you can afford to travel to all your desired locations to figure it out for yourself. Why listen to others who desire different qualities or are biased.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Affordability is worth mentioning but is not a limitation for this list.

    I don't care if a pro mtb biker is from the city

    I don't care if the city is kid friendly

    I don't care about DH. In fact DH mtb riders seem to be almost a different subculture. More "tough" and "extreme" whereas general mtb trail riders are pleasant, balanced, friendly and upbeat.

    I had never even heard on Bentonville, AR before this thread. I googled it and it looks like a pretty cool city.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    no way. total dump. nobody wants to live here - er - there.
    aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaand we're full! Really, really full!

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    what about reno, nv with south lake tahoe 1.5 hours away?

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Blah, blah, blah blah..
    Then why'd you post that obnoxiously long screenshot? Seems you have no interest in this topic yet here you are.
    By continuing to browse my posts, you agree to accept my use of cookies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by titus View Post
    what about reno, nv with south lake tahoe 1.5 hours away?
    I'd try to live up the road from Reno, there are a lot of options in the area though and some stuff to ride in winter too.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Also wasn't Colorado Springs ranked the most dangerous small city in the US recently?...or highest crime or something?
    Yep, something like that.
    https://www.csbj.com/2018/04/10/u-s-...place-to-live/

    It's also the place that is going to get nuked second, after DC. And is full of gay hating preachers who do meth with male escorts, bunnies the size of labradors with nasty pointed teeth, and not enough taco trucks on every corner.

    Only one of those things is not true.

    It sucks, don't come here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harryman View Post
    Yep, something like that.
    https://www.csbj.com/2018/04/10/u-s-...place-to-live/

    It's also the place that is going to get nuked second, after DC. And is full of gay hating preachers who do meth with male escorts, bunnies the size of labradors with nasty pointed teeth, and not enough taco trucks on every corner.

    Only one of those things is not true.

    It sucks, don't come here.
    Hilarious! As soon as a I saw Colo Springs I thought to myself great riding, great mountains, but lots of Focus on the Family/Ted Haggard types.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Then why'd you post that obnoxiously long screenshot? Seems you have no interest in this topic yet here you are.
    Blah, blah, blah, blah. Did you read what I said or just skim it?
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Are these your personal criteria, or criteria you think should be general ones for this question?



    I think criteria for the question are important. I think the first one should be to decide if we're talking about the best mtb cities to VISIT, or the best ones to LIVE IN. Everything else is going to follow from that.
    I am just throwing out possible criteria. Open to change.

    My justification.
    1. Size. Small towns are awesome, wicked culture, amazing trails, but finding work is hard.
    2. 100 miles of single track should be entry to be considered. That is what the really big ride destinations are running.
    3. Pedigree. If riding isn't good enough to produce a pro rider or attract one then it really isn't that good. If you go to a place like Squamish and you head out on the right locals ride there can be more 10 riders who have stood on the podium at world XC, DH or and EWS. All the good riding spots that I know of in Canada and US have somebody based out of there who competes at the professional level.

    4. If the community can't put on kids events then it doesn't have culture. Kids bring energy and excitement to the sport that lifts everyone.

    5. Variety. Doesn't need to be said.


    I would add affordabilty to list. But affordable is different to different people. Where I live the average home price is over $400,000 but it is considered quite affordable because the average family income is around $80,000.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

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    my question is pretty open-ended. for example, Whistler, bc may be one of the best mtb cities *but* the average home price is $1.7 million. so just include a note if there are caveats

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    Quote Originally Posted by titus View Post
    my question is pretty open-ended. for example, Whistler, bc may be one of the best mtb cities *but* the average home price is $1.7 million. so just include a note if there are caveats
    You never answered whether you wanted the best mtb cities to live in, or to visit. You are speaking as though you are looking for the best city to live in, but have not been explicit about it.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

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    Like I said keep it open ended. If it's a great mtb city but has no good jobs then just say so

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    Quote Originally Posted by titus View Post
    Like I said keep it open ended. If it's a great mtb city but has no good jobs then just say so
    But the criteria are going to differ based on various livability issues vs how well set up the area is for visitors.

    If you don't care about those issues or the differences between them, then you might as well just not ask about cities at all, and simply ask about places to ride - the places with the best trails.

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    don't move to Austin, Texas. We're full, and it's hot and recently taken over by brainless hipsters e-scooters.

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    Quote Originally Posted by titus View Post
    my question is pretty open-ended. for example, Whistler, bc may be one of the best mtb cities *but* the average home price is $1.7 million. so just include a note if there are caveats
    Whistler is a great place to ride, but on the bets MTB cities? No.

    I would say they donít have the trail variety to one of the best.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

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    you're overthinking, my friend

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    Quote Originally Posted by LMN View Post
    I think any question like this needs to have criteria.

    1. Size. Population centre bigger than 40,000.
    2. Minimum of 100 miles of single track within riding distance.
    3. Pedigree. A professional mountain biker needs to either have grown up there or currently lives there.
    4. Kids. Must have an active kids mountain bike program.
    5. Variety. Must have trails that are fun on an XC bike and trails that are best on a DH bike.

    If we restrict it to the US then I would have to say Bellingham or Prescott. If you add Canada there is a lot that fits the mold, but Kamloops or Kelowna are top in my opinion.
    Bentonville would fall into that criteria.

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    I lived in Atlanta for three years. lots of good trails to ride if you're willing to drive a bit to get to them. riding to the trails was a pretty lousy option where I lived on the northwest side of the city, but there are lots of good trails close to the city (Bear Creek, Racoon Mtn, Sope Creek, Yellow River, Chicopee, Blankets, etc) and warm weather most of the year. when you can get a day/ weekend off, you can drive to Coldwater Mountain in Alabama or anywhere in the south end of the Appalachians like Asheville, Allatoona Creek, FATS, etc.

    I have been living in Austin for the past 5+ years and I love the trails here too. I visited some old friends in ATL around Christmas and found that Atlanta is an even nicer city to hang out than I remember, but the roads are horrible to get around on a bike. you need to drive to get to trails, whereas I can ride a few blocks to get to awesome singletrack in ATX city.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Then why'd you post that obnoxiously long screenshot? Seems you have no interest in this topic yet here you are.
    Typical.

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    Quote Originally Posted by titus View Post
    you're overthinking, my friend
    you're being too vague. your point?

    you simply cannot have a "best of" list of any sort without defining criteria. you have intentionally avoided defining anything or setting parameters.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Finch Platte View Post
    Typical.
    That I posted a large screen shot, or typical that Korn jumped to the conclusion that I have no interest in this topic from my following post? I posted a large screen shot showing what one magazine out of numerous ones chose as their list. Which I also stated I didnít agree with. My following post with the blah blah remark that Korn took offence to simply stated that itís a very subjective topic with many different opinions on whatís best. One mans perfect mtb city is another mans undesirable. One would have to live in every city ever mentioned for a lengthy time to make such a decision and even then itís not going to be everyoneís choice even if they all lived in all the same cities for the same length of time. Thatís where my blah, blah, blah remark came from. Typle huh?
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    I would be looking for the city with the least amount of riders so I could have all of the trials to myself
    May I suggest Adams, Oklahoma? I bet you'd be the only rider there. Have fun!

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    Quote Originally Posted by tuckerjt07 View Post
    Bentonville would fall into that criteria.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
    Haven't ridden there, heard good things though.

    But...

    According to trail forks it only have 96km of trail and 100m of vertical.

    Not enough trail length and 100m of vertical isn't enough to really have fun on a DH bike.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

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    Quote Originally Posted by LMN View Post
    Haven't ridden there, heard good things though.

    But...

    According to trail forks it only have 96km of trail and 100m of vertical.

    Not enough trail length and 100m of vertical isn't enough to really have fun on a DH bike.
    There is well over 100 miles of single track accessible from the square in downtown Bentonville. The problem is they are averaging around a mile of trail a week opening in the region. It's hard for the trail map sites to keep up. Good problem to have I guess. There will be an additional 50 miles opening up around September this year as well.

    For the downhill bike you're looking at a 45 minute, 25 mile, drive to get to Leatherwood, 2.5 hours to get to Mount Magazine, when it opens. 45 minutes is less time than it will take you to get across many cities.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    6.Affordability.
    Good luck with Steamboat, Crested Butte or Boulder, etc.

    Also wasn't Colorado Springs ranked the most dangerous small city in the US recently?...or highest crime or something?
    And Boulder is not exactly an mtb mecca. A great city with more bikes on the streets as transportation than youíll likely ever see anywhere else. But for trails itís not considered high on trails although there are some. More so Lyons down the road has a great MTB feel and community but very small. The Springs has a lot of trails but in my opinion not the most desirable city otherwise. Steamboat is amazing but as you said expensive but so is Boulder. Steamboat has always been one of my favorite places in Colorado having grown up in the state. Itís all subjective on what you like.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by titus View Post
    what about reno, nv with south lake tahoe 1.5 hours away?
    Have you ever been to Reno?

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    Everybody's best mtb City is going to be different for a variety of reasons.
    Definitely somewhere in Colorado or California... Everybody, stay there please.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    I posted a large screen shot
    I wish we hadn't coached you on how to post pics on mtbr.
    By continuing to browse my posts, you agree to accept my use of cookies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    And Boulder is not exactly an mtb mecca. A great city with more bikes on the streets as transportation than youíll likely ever see anywhere else. But for trails itís not considered high on trails although there are some. More so Lyons down the road has a great MTB feel and community but very small. The Springs has a lot of trails but in my opinion not the most desirable city otherwise. Steamboat is amazing but as you said expensive but so is Boulder. Steamboat has always been one of my favorite places in Colorado having grown up in the state. Itís all subjective on what you like.
    I haven't been in about 15 years but yeah, Steamboat is awesome. I've been checking real estate all over because I want to buy something somewhere and going on memory 4&500 square foot "condos" were going for $450-$500k. Not a Boulder fan though climbing in the Flat Irons is killer. I bet like a lot of places it was cool once upon a time. Not done much in the springs but shower in the hostel passing through. As a town I liked the vibe (other than the high tourist ratio) but again that was a ways back. One of my best friends lives in Salida and I guess that's growing gangbusters as well. If only I had the foresight to buy property there 20 years ago. The trick is to invest in the next Boulder and that's kind of my agenda. Though I'd like to live there and be happy until I retire and cash in before it goes full asshole.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tuckerjt07 View Post
    There is well over 100 miles of single track accessible from the square in downtown Bentonville. The problem is they are averaging around a mile of trail a week opening in the region. It's hard for the trail map sites to keep up. Good problem to have I guess. There will be an additional 50 miles opening up around September this year as well.

    For the downhill bike you're looking at a 45 minute, 25 mile, drive to get to Leatherwood, 2.5 hours to get to Mount Magazine, when it opens. 45 minutes is less time than it will take you to get across many cities.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
    Just to give perspective on the competition.

    My nomination, Kamloops BC.

    1. Polulation 100,000K
    2. 200km of trails on trail forks, at least that much not on trail forks.
    3. Pro-riders. Probably more variety then any other city in North America. How many other cities have riders who have been on the podium in WC XC, DH and Redbull Rampage. A small list of pros live in or are from: Matt Hunter, Catharine Pendrel, Graham Agassiz, Wade Simmons, and many many more.
    4. Great active kids league, and a strong high school mountain bike team.
    5. Variety. Huge XC networks, long descents where you can put an Enduro bike to its limits (some are 15 minutes at race pace), and trails like this one in the middle of town.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o6L-LGK0k7U&t=199s
    6. Affordability. Considered one the most affordable communities in BC.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harryman View Post
    Yep, something like that.
    https://www.csbj.com/2018/04/10/u-s-...place-to-live/

    It's also the place that is going to get nuked second, after DC. And is full of gay hating preachers who do meth with male escorts, bunnies the size of labradors with nasty pointed teeth, and not enough taco trucks on every corner.

    Only one of those things is not true.

    It sucks, don't come here.
    Lol!
    I've got my Springs crossed.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    Everyone is different.
    For me:
    Size: smaller is better, with access to a larger town.
    Kid's programs: We are empty nesters.
    Pedigree: ?
    Affordable: not an issue.
    Access to international flights: big, for us.
    Variety: We're spoiled with over 400 miles of trails and 4.5 hours to Moab.
    Must have good skiing.

    Except for the airport access, and proximity to a large town, Crested Butte would be at the top of my list.

    For us, Park City, Utah.
    I haven't ridden there. But grapevine is it is awesome.

    Pedigree: Haley Batton. 2017 U23 US national champion rides for the Cliff Team.
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  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    May I suggest Adams, Oklahoma? I bet you'd be the only rider there. Have fun!
    checked it out...no way! Not enough winter weather....if I could find a place like that in MN or MI I would be set!!!

    got it!!!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funkley,_Minnesota
    " ...the moonlit swamp Krampus is a king among bikes." - geraldooka

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    Quote Originally Posted by LMN View Post
    Just to give perspective on the competition.

    My nomination, Kamloops BC.

    1. Polulation 100,000K
    2. 200km of trails on trail forks, at least that much not on trail forks.
    3. Pro-riders. Probably more variety then any other city in North America. How many other cities have riders who have been on the podium in WC XC, DH and Redbull Rampage. A small list of pros live in or are from: Matt Hunter, Catharine Pendrel, Graham Agassiz, Wade Simmons, and many many more.
    4. Great active kids league, and a strong high school mountain bike team.
    5. Variety. Huge XC networks, long descents where you can put an Enduro bike to its limits (some are 15 minutes at race pace), and trails like this one in the middle of town.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o6L-LGK0k7U&t=199s
    6. Affordability. Considered one the most affordable communities in BC.
    It seems like a lot of us are very proud of where we live, and happy to be there, which is obviously a truly great thing. A blessing.

    I think I can make a decent case for Calgary as well. The biggest detractor to me is the limited season here. November to March are usually crazy shitty. weather-wise, although this year has been an exception so far. That said, within the next 10 years, I will be in a position to leave and go elsewhere whenever I wish to escape the frigid temps, for some super rad biking trips in warmer climates. Hell, I have pretty much been doing that already for the past 10 years.

    As for Kamloops, don't forget - also home of Dustin Adams and We Are One, which is pretty cool in my view.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    I wish we hadn't coached you on how to post pics on mtbr.
    I was posting pictures far before you joined, itís the GIFís that screw with me on an iPad.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    checked it out...no way! Not enough winter weather....if I could find a place like that in MN or MI I would be set!!!

    got it!!!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funkley,_Minnesota
    Fun times in Funkley. They have their own road sign and bar. Four of the five residents are women so if youíre a guy looking to date one of them the odds would be in your favor.

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    +1 for Bentonville, AR if you're looking for a smaller town feel and year 'round riding. Great MTB culture. Some may not like the heat, doesn't bother me. It's not that bad. Bentonville is close enough to Fayetville, so you have big town conveniences (jobs, medical, shopping, etc.). A lot of other outdoor stuff to do as well. Cheap to live there.

    +1 for Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW) if you want or need a large metropolis (we call it the Metroplex, 9,500 square miles with close to 8 million minions). Over 30 trails with over 250 miles of year 'round single track within 45 minutes of each other. No shortage of bike shops across the area. Obliviously an overload of job opportunities, medical, shopping, other stuff to do, etc. And decent cost of living for its size, etc. But, if you think Bentonville is too hot, don't bother with DFW.
    You didn't quit riding because you're old, you're old because you quit riding.

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    no way. total dump. nobody wants to live here - er - there.
    Ha! I see what you did there....

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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    I would be looking for the city with the least amount of riders so I could have all of the trials to myself
    Anywhere between Mercury and Jackass Flats in Nevada. Just don't track the dust into your house, it could be radioactive.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    Fun times in Funkley. They have their own road sign and bar. Four of the five residents are women so if youíre a guy looking to date one of them the odds would be in your favor.
    yep...it's even got the "fun" in it's name!!
    " ...the moonlit swamp Krampus is a king among bikes." - geraldooka

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    Quote Originally Posted by 410sprint View Post
    Anywhere between Mercury and Jackass Flats in Nevada. Just don't track the dust into your house, it could be radioactive.
    Oooh...high risk!!! As long as the winter riding is good, I would brave the radioactivity
    " ...the moonlit swamp Krampus is a king among bikes." - geraldooka

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    Quote Originally Posted by fredcook View Post
    +1 for Bentonville, AR if you're looking for a smaller town feel and year 'round riding. Great MTB culture. Some may not like the heat, doesn't bother me. It's not that bad.

    I totally get that some people are not bothered by the heat and being soaked through all the time, but if you can ride in that kind of heat, then literally every other place in the US also has "year round riding", including here in Anchorage. What isn't year-round? People are riding fatbikes right now in CO, MN, New England, etc., people are riding the desert in the summer and winter, etc.

    lol@Dallas. Yes, please move to Dallas! Please drive down the home prices in the mountain places!
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    Okay. I can't resist.

    Calgary...

    1. The City Itself - 4th "Most Livable City" in the World

    First off, as a place to live, Calgary was recently voted the 4th most liveable place in the world:

    "...A new global survey has ranked Calgary as the fourth most ďlivableĒ city in the world, with Toronto and Vancouver falling not far behind. The Economistís 2018 Global Livability Index surveyed 140 cities around the world and ranked them based on 30 factors in five broad categories: stability, healthcare, culture and environment, education and infrastructure. With perfect scores in four categories, Calgary ranked fourth with an average score of 97.5, falling behind only Vienna, Austria (99.1), Melbourne, Australia (98.4) and Osaka, Japan (97.7)...".

    https://www.ctvnews.ca/mobile/calgar...orld-1.4051997

    2. The Trails - Proximity, Diversity and Sheer Quantity

    I have spent a fair amount of time now biking in every one of Canadaís mountain biking destinations (as well as most US biking-focused destinations). Most recently, I went on an extended Western Canada swing late last summer and covered a lot of regions.

    In the Calgary area, West Bragg Creek and Moose Mountain each alone have significantly more riding (more diverse, and more trails) than MANY other ENTIRE areas. And that is just scratching the surface. Some of the stuff off Moose (and Razor's) has as much gnar as anyone could possibly want.

    https://mmbts.com/trails/

    Trail Maps ‚Äď GBCTA ‚Äď Volunteer Trails Assoc.

    Add to that all of the various sub-regions of:

    a. Kananaskis Country (Prairieview/Jewell/Razor's Edge/Baldy Pass area, Cox/Jumpingpound area, Powderface area and others);

    b. Canmore (including the Canmore Nordic Centre);

    c. Banff (including Minnewanka and the Tunnel Mountain network); and

    d. Canada Olympic Park, if you want some lift assisted, new school DH stuff (the park was redesigned by the Whistler Bike Park crew).

    All of these destinations are within an hour of my driveway. Canada Olympic Park is 5 minutes away.

    Fernie and Golden are both within striking distance (2.5 hours for each).

    Here is the trail map for the Canmore Nordic Centre, which was one of the venues for the 1988 Winter Olympics (as was Canada Olympic Park):

    https://www.albertaparks.ca/media/39...trails-map.pdf

    Recently from PinkBike...this is only scratching the surface...maybe 1% at best of the local riding:

    https://www.pinkbike.com/news/east-o...mountains.html

    Here is a pic from Prairieview - the trailhead is 35 minutes from my driveway:

    best cities for mtb-ers?-fullsizeoutput_14.jpg

    3. The Trails - Single Track Climbing

    I HATE climbing on fire roads. In some of the more popular regions I have biked at, this is the only means of accessing the downs. Thankfully, this does not exist here. Dirt trails up...dirt trails down...

    4. My Daily Commute

    95% of my daily commute from the extreme west side of Calgary to downtown, is on one of two car-free bike paths (one on each side of the Bow River), with a decent 5 minute twisty downhill dirt blast in the middle that's a great eye opener each morning.

    https://www.visitcalgary.com/things-...ays-in-calgary

    5. The LBSs

    Bow Cycle rocks. 62 years in business and still going strong. Stronger than ever actually. It is one of the largest brick and mortar LBSs in the world. And it is but one of many large and excellent LBSs in Calgary.

    6. The Vibe

    For anyone who thinks there is no mountain biking culture (comparable to the surfing culture), spend a weekday evening or day on the weekend at West Bragg Creek. Pre and post-ride, the trail head is incredible. So is the trailhead for the shuttling at Moose Mountain. Beers, BBQ's and tunes. Awesome.

    In conclusion, I am not contending that Calgary is necessarily "the best" biking centre, but it's decent. And I can travel to wherever else I want, when the urge overcomes me. It's a great home base for any biking enthusiast.

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    Las Vegas.

    Why? There are so many great trails here that not a lot of people know about and the trail system keeps growing and growing thanks to the local community, I've met nothing but cool people out there, but more importantly because I live here

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Okay. I can't resist.

    Calgary...
    My wife and I visited Canmore a couple of summers ago and LOVED it. We hiked around a bit on some amazing mountains and I have been wondering if there was much mountain biking in the area since the trails were mostly very steep (as in, steeper than most people would enjoy riding).
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails best cities for mtb-ers?-carnivores.jpg  


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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    My wife and I visited Canmore a couple of summers ago and LOVED it. We hiked around a bit on some amazing mountains and I have been wondering if there was much mountain biking in the area since the trails were mostly very steep (as in, steeper than most people would enjoy riding).
    Canmore is AWESOME. I bike with my daughter at the Canmore Nordic Centre usually once every week and a half or so. Canmore Nordic Centre has everything from green trails to blacks. Further north of the Canmore Nordic Centre, there are some trails that can get a little sketch, but everything out there is generally rideable. And awesome.

    Always carry bear spray. And bangers

    That said, I stick to the known biking trails. There are a lot of hiking trails that would be no fun with a bike.

    REALLY happy you enjoyed your stay. I hope you come back some time in the not so distant future.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    My wife and I visited Canmore a couple of summers ago and LOVED it. We hiked around a bit on some amazing mountains and I have been wondering if there was much mountain biking in the area since the trails were mostly very steep (as in, steeper than most people would enjoy riding).
    Last time I was in Jasper there were rangers staged at trail heads. They would not let you hike in until you were grouped up with 4-6 other people. This made for some interested bear encounters to say the least.

    Not sure on Calgary but Banff would be a lovely place to call home for me.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Last time I was in Jasper there were rangers staged at trail heads. They would not let you hike in until you were grouped up with 4-6 other people. This made for some interested bear encounters to say the least.

    Not sure on Calgary but Banff would be a lovely place to call home for me.
    The problem with Banff is that you cannot own a home there unless you work within Banff itself (or know people who know people). That said, it's only an hour and 15 from my driveway so no no big deal accessing it.

    You could easily live in Canmore though...which is on the edge of the Park, so no strange residency requirements there.

    In the Calgary area, they make you group together in the fall when there is an overload of tourists to see the beautiful larch trees turn bright yellow in the mountains. That said, the hiking areas are generally distinct from the biking areas. I never see many hikers on any of the biking trails.

  77. #77
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    Yayyyy Canada! I'd go back in a heartbeat.

    That water!
    best cities for mtb-ers?-canmore2.jpg

    That trail!
    best cities for mtb-ers?-canmore1.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    Yayyyy Canada! I'd go back in a heartbeat.

    That water!
    Click image for larger version. 

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    That trail!
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Is the first pic at Barrier Lake? Or Lake Louise? Or is it from the Canmore Nordic Centre area?

    What about the second pic?

    Those shots are literally a dime a dozen here (as you know). They could be from one of a number of different areas.

  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Is the first pic at Barrier Lake? Or Lake Louise? Or is it from the Canmore Nordic Centre area?

    What about the second pic?

    Those shots are literally a dime a dozen here (as you know). They could be from one of a number of different areas.
    First image is Lake Louise taken along the trail up to the Lake Agnes tea house. The 2nd photo is from the Chester Lakes area. We only had 4 days there but I wish I had all summer to explore.

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    All - apologies for getting carried away on my enthusiasm. Clearly we all love where we live and are proud of our local biking, which is awesome.

    Is there a ďbestĒ place? Who knows. But thankfully, there are countless areas throughout North America and beyond with truly world class biking that are easily accessible to us all.

    From this point forward, I will do my best to keep my enthusiasm in check. Apologies again.

  81. #81
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    How wonderfully Canadian! I'll listen to talk about Canada all day.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    My wife and I visited Canmore a couple of summers ago and LOVED it. We hiked around a bit on some amazing mountains and I have been wondering if there was much mountain biking in the area since the trails were mostly very steep (as in, steeper than most people would enjoy riding).
    Funny sign.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Funny sign.
    Pretty standard fare.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Funny sign.
    After seeing that sign we decided to continue with our hike, but I nervously had my bear spray in my hands ready to go. We didn't see any large predators, however a small bird (grouse, I think) flushed from the brush beside our path and I nearly sprayed the hell out of my wife!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    After seeing that sign we decided to continue with our hike, but I nervously had my bear spray in my hands ready to go. We didn't see any large predators, however a small bird (grouse, I think) flushed from the brush beside our path and I nearly sprayed the hell out of my wife!
    LOL
    I can understand that.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  86. #86
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    Where's all my peeps in Kansas? Speak up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by langster831 View Post
    Where's all my peeps in Kansas? Speak up.
    You know we are talking about mountain biking right? LOL

    Being more serious, that made me curious what the highest elevation in Kansas was. I was surprised to see the answer to my question was over 4000 ft. Mount Sunflower certainly doesn't look like your traditional mountain though.

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    After growing up in the coastal mountains of SoCal and living the snowboard bum life in NorCal, I didn't get into mountain biking until I moved to Kansas. Yup, lots of places I'd rather be right now.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    After growing up in the coastal mountains of SoCal and living the snowboard bum life in NorCal, I didn't get into mountain biking until I moved to Kansas. Yup, lots of places I'd rather be right now.
    That is certainly a big culture change moving from CA to KS. lol

    I lived in South Lake Tahoe for one winter and worked at Heavenly. Definitely an awesome experience! Really want to make it back up there with my bike.

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    Quote Originally Posted by langster831 View Post
    Where's all my peeps in Kansas? Speak up.
    KCMO here.

    The trails are surprisingly great in KC. Lots of tech and variety, but it's not the climb 5 miles, then go downhill 5 miles type of riding. More like ups and downs. I wouldn't necessarily say KCMO is a good MTB town or city per se. People here are highly protective of their trails, which for the most part, is great. But when it rains 1/10th of an inch overnight and the 'stewards'(gatekeepers) close them for 2 weeks(exaggeration here, but you get my point), it gets pretty frustrating. I'm not out to destroy trails or ride in the mud, but there has to be a happy medium here.

    Other than that, it's a good place to be a mountain biker. But good isn't great like other cities or towns.
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    Quote Originally Posted by almazing View Post
    KCMO here.

    The trails are surprisingly great in KC. Lots of tech and variety, but it's not the climb 5 miles, then go downhill 5 miles type of riding. More like ups and downs. I wouldn't necessarily say KCMO is a good MTB town or city per se. People here are highly protective of their trails, which for the most part, is great. But when it rains 1/10th of an inch overnight and the 'stewards'(gatekeepers) close them for 2 weeks(exaggeration here, but you get my point), it gets pretty frustrating. I'm not out to destroy trails or ride in the mud, but there has to be a happy medium here.

    Other than that, it's a good place to be a mountain biker. But good isn't great like other cities or towns.
    I've heard good things. It's hard to leave the land of Oz and head that way though. Not a loaded question, legitimately curious, some people down here have said some of the trails go through sketchy areas, not sure how they define sketchy though. Anything to be worried about if I ever make it up there?

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    Cost of living (do you ever want to own a home or rent forever)?
    Crime, can I park my Jeep with no top/doors and not worry about someone stealing stuff?

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    Quote Originally Posted by rynomx785 View Post
    You know we are talking about mountain biking right? LOL

    Being more serious, that made me curious what the highest elevation in Kansas was. I was surprised to see the answer to my question was over 4000 ft. Mount Sunflower certainly doesn't look like your traditional mountain though.
    Switchgrass has always looked kind of cool out in the middle of nowhere in Kansas.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bqNtJkHR23Y

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    Quote Originally Posted by tuckerjt07 View Post
    I've heard good things. It's hard to leave the land of Oz and head that way though. Not a loaded question, legitimately curious, some people down here have said some of the trails go through sketchy areas, not sure how they define sketchy though. Anything to be worried about if I ever make it up there?

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
    Some trails in the city-city have a few sketchy areas. More so in the MO side. For instance, BRP north loop goes through an underpass where you may or may not encounter a seedy character(s) here and there. Kessler Park is minutes east of downtown, but the neighborhoods it crosses can be considered sketchy for some folks. Swope is great and close to the zoo. But I've heard people breaking in to people's cars there. Trails in the suburbs or outskirts are pretty safe.

    Statistically, KC is one of the most dangerous cities in the US as far as violent crime goes. Just don't piss anyone off and look at anyone the wrong way and you should be alright.

    One thing I haven't heard a lot about are bike thefts in KC. As opposed to a more popular mountain biking destination where MTBs are targeted, people here largely ignore your fancy and shiny $7000 bike. That's not to say that it doesn't happen or someone won't steal your bike if they have the opportunity, but thieves just don't seem to be after them. I have a buddy who lives in Oakland who's had 2 Yetis stolen from his BASEMENT twice in 2 years. Luckily, they were insured, but still.
    I no longer like to party. But I like the idea of it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by almazing View Post
    Some trails in the city-city have a few sketchy areas. More so in the MO side. For instance, BRP north loop goes through an underpass where you may or may not encounter a seedy character(s) here and there. Kessler Park is minutes east of downtown, but the neighborhoods it crosses can be considered sketchy for some folks. Swope is great and close to the zoo. But I've heard people breaking in to people's cars there. Trails in the suburbs or outskirts are pretty safe.

    Statistically, KC is one of the most dangerous cities in the US as far as violent crime goes. Just don't piss anyone off and look at anyone the wrong way and you should be alright.
    Sounds good, I grew up hanging out in Little Rock and Pine Bluff, both of which have appearances on various not good to be on top ten lists in the world. Doesn't sound too different. Will have to give it a go sometime.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tuckerjt07 View Post
    some people down here have said some of the trails go through sketchy areas, not sure how they define sketchy though.
    I've heard that line so often in my life and I'll I've gotta do is look at the people who are saying it and where they come from. Usually, the people saying it don't really know what a "sketchy" area really is, and the places they are referring to are just poor areas. People from very rural areas who are just ignorant about cities. People who lived in fairly upscale areas who look down on cities and poor people. THOSE are the people who I see complaining about "sketchy" neighborhoods. I grew up in a rust belt city and have lived and worked in neighborhoods destroyed by the loss of factories and a military base that closed decades ago. I've seen plenty of poor neighborhoods, and I've seen plenty of sketchy ones, and there's a big diff.

    Probably the starkest example was when I was an undergraduate. I was driving through town with a friend who got nervous when we passed through a section of town that was poorer, and wanted to lock all the doors in the car because it was "sketchy". No, that neighborhood was very much NOT sketchy. Poor, yes, but when I rode my bike through that neighborhood, people sitting on their porches would wave as I rode by. People don't do that in sketchy neighborhoods. She grew up in a rural small town in Ohio and truly didn't know any actual sketchy areas.

    So when someone comments on "sketchy" areas, you should definitely start looking at their perspective and how they define sketchy. I'm going to bet that their perspective heavily skews their impression of what's sketchy.

    FWIW, I have ridden in Kansas City and agree that for a large city, it's got a nice network of mtb trails. I'm not sure which trail(s) the people you know were talking about, but the one I rode when I was there was on the Kansas side, and in a wealthier suburb. I know there's a goal to build out a pretty extensive network of interconnected trails all through the riverside parks thoughout the city. So I have no doubt there's a wide variety of neighborhoods adjacent to the riverside parks.

  97. #97
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    Scottsdale.

    Great town and close to lots of variety in trails.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I've heard that line so often in my life and I'll I've gotta do is look at the people who are saying it and where they come from. Usually, the people saying it don't really know what a "sketchy" area really is, and the places they are referring to are just poor areas. People from very rural areas who are just ignorant about cities. People who lived in fairly upscale areas who look down on cities and poor people. THOSE are the people who I see complaining about "sketchy" neighborhoods. I grew up in a rust belt city and have lived and worked in neighborhoods destroyed by the loss of factories and a military base that closed decades ago. I've seen plenty of poor neighborhoods, and I've seen plenty of sketchy ones, and there's a big diff.

    Probably the starkest example was when I was an undergraduate. I was driving through town with a friend who got nervous when we passed through a section of town that was poorer, and wanted to lock all the doors in the car because it was "sketchy". No, that neighborhood was very much NOT sketchy. Poor, yes, but when I rode my bike through that neighborhood, people sitting on their porches would wave as I rode by. People don't do that in sketchy neighborhoods. She grew up in a rural small town in Ohio and truly didn't know any actual sketchy areas.

    So when someone comments on "sketchy" areas, you should definitely start looking at their perspective and how they define sketchy. I'm going to bet that their perspective heavily skews their impression of what's sketchy.

    FWIW, I have ridden in Kansas City and agree that for a large city, it's got a nice network of mtb trails. I'm not sure which trail(s) the people you know were talking about, but the one I rode when I was there was on the Kansas side, and in a wealthier suburb. I know there's a goal to build out a pretty extensive network of interconnected trails all through the riverside parks thoughout the city. So I have no doubt there's a wide variety of neighborhoods adjacent to the riverside parks.
    At least two of the people are from the not so nice parts of the LA metroplex so I give their opinion some credence. Knowing what I know about KC it's a valid opinion. Most of the country does not realize how bad things can be in regards to violent crime in Little Rock and the next large cities off of the Interstates that leave it, major distribution hub and routes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I've heard that line so often in my life and I'll I've gotta do is look at the people who are saying it and where they come from. Usually, the people saying it don't really know what a "sketchy" area really is, and the places they are referring to are just poor areas. People from very rural areas who are just ignorant about cities. People who lived in fairly upscale areas who look down on cities and poor people. THOSE are the people who I see complaining about "sketchy" neighborhoods. I grew up in a rust belt city and have lived and worked in neighborhoods destroyed by the loss of factories and a military base that closed decades ago. I've seen plenty of poor neighborhoods, and I've seen plenty of sketchy ones, and there's a big diff.

    Probably the starkest example was when I was an undergraduate. I was driving through town with a friend who got nervous when we passed through a section of town that was poorer, and wanted to lock all the doors in the car because it was "sketchy". No, that neighborhood was very much NOT sketchy. Poor, yes, but when I rode my bike through that neighborhood, people sitting on their porches would wave as I rode by. People don't do that in sketchy neighborhoods. She grew up in a rural small town in Ohio and truly didn't know any actual sketchy areas.

    So when someone comments on "sketchy" areas, you should definitely start looking at their perspective and how they define sketchy. I'm going to bet that their perspective heavily skews their impression of what's sketchy.

    FWIW, I have ridden in Kansas City and agree that for a large city, it's got a nice network of mtb trails. I'm not sure which trail(s) the people you know were talking about, but the one I rode when I was there was on the Kansas side, and in a wealthier suburb. I know there's a goal to build out a pretty extensive network of interconnected trails all through the riverside parks thoughout the city. So I have no doubt there's a wide variety of neighborhoods adjacent to the riverside parks.
    Same thing about sketchy....I teach kids that come from the most affluent parts of C-bus Oh....and they will say that about the other affluent neighborhoods....I always hear "Oh, your home only has 5 bedrooms...that is sketch bro"; or "that neighborhood has cars parked on the street...must be sketch"

    I live in one of the older - and safest - neighborhoods that has kept it's value property wise, but the houses are mostly pre WW 2 builds....really cool architecture and solid old skool builds...and my students always ask if I feel safe walking form the house to the garage

    sketch is in the eye of the beholder...
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    Quote Originally Posted by rynomx785 View Post
    That is certainly a big culture change moving from CA to KS. lol

    I lived in South Lake Tahoe for one winter and worked at Heavenly. Definitely an awesome experience! Really want to make it back up there with my bike.
    Culture change for sure! I hated it for a long time, now I just go sit in SoCal traffic for a couple weeks two or three times a year and then I'm glad to be back for a bit. I actually preferred the greater Sacramento area to SoCal in some ways, would be hard to choose if I went back. I did Kirkwood for a couple seasons, love that place!

    Quote Originally Posted by hogfly View Post
    Switchgrass has always looked kind of cool out in the middle of nowhere in Kansas.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bqNtJkHR23Y
    I've ridden there a few times, need to get back up there. You don't feel like you're in KS, seems more like far eastern CO.
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