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  1. #1
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    Bamboo bike company hypothetical situation

    -= *Hypothetical Situation* =-

    If a company were to develop an AM/trail bicycle and an XC bicycle that were both priced in the $2300-#33000 outfitted with X9 or X0 components (or Shimano XT or XTR), both are full suspension and made out of bamboo.

    These two bikes would both be of a high enough quality to compete with other high end bikes from other companies respectively (ex: AM/trail bamboo vs Trek Fuel EX and XC bamboo vs Santa cruz blur XC). The bamboo bikes would weigh a little but not significantly more than those two examples. Both high end bicycles.

    The bamboo frames would be lugged frames with natural fiber wrapping lugs (i.e. not carbon lugs).


    MTBR community, how do you think the bicycling industry and customers of other bikes of that caliber would receive these two bikes? How would they react to claims of bamboo bikes measuring up in performance to other high end bikes? Would the material of bamboo assuage your decision to demo or purchase bikes such as these?

    I ask of thee MTBR...
    Last edited by bboyuseless; 01-07-2013 at 08:14 PM.

  2. #2
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    I'd but one in a heartbeat as long as it rode well.
    The novelty would be so worth it.
    As long as you tell me its not going to break I would trust you and give it hell.

  3. #3
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    Honestly? I'd wait a few years to see how they do. If they appear to be selling and riding well I'd consider it.

    Not something I'd be the first to own, though.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by bboyuseless View Post
    -= *Hypothetical Situation* =-

    If a company were to develop an AM/trail bicycle and an XC bicycle that were both priced in the $1800-$2800 (most likely on the lower end of this range) outfitted with X9 or X0 components (or Shimano XT or XTR), both are full suspension and made out of bamboo.

    These two bikes would both be of a high enough quality to compete with other high end bikes from other companies respectively (ex: AM/trail bamboo vs Trek Fuel EX and XC bamboo vs Santa cruz blur XC). The bamboo bikes would weigh a little but not significantly more than those two examples. Both high end bicycles.

    The bamboo frames would be lugged frames with natural fiber wrapping lugs (i.e. not carbon lugs).


    MTBR community, how do you think the bicycling industry and customers of other bikes of that caliber would receive these two bikes? How would they react to claims of bamboo bikes measuring up in performance to other high end bikes? Would the material of bamboo assuage your decision to demo or purchase bikes such as these?

    I ask of thee MTBR...
    Good luck with those price points.

    A Trek Fuel with XT goes for $4100
    The Blur XC is $2800 for just the frame and shock.

    You are proposing bamboo suspension frames? I would not trust one until it had been on the trails under more than a few riders for a few years.

    The use of bamboo would make me less likely to buy, but it also depends on the suspension design and how the bamboo is used.
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  5. #5
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    Bamboo Bikes

    Some people already started producing them in Manila Philippines where there is ample supply of the raw material

    https://www.facebook.com/Kawayantechbamboobikes

    KAWAYANTECH ON BAMBOO BIKES IN THE PHILIPPINES | kawayantech

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by edmorales View Post
    Some people already started producing them in Manila Philippines where there is ample supply of the raw material

    https://www.facebook.com/Kawayantechbamboobikes

    KAWAYANTECH ON BAMBOO BIKES IN THE PHILIPPINES | kawayantech
    No suspension bikes there.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bboyuseless View Post
    -= *Hypothetical Situation* =-

    If a company were to develop an AM/trail bicycle and an XC bicycle that were both priced in the $1800-$2800 (most likely on the lower end of this range) outfitted with X9 or X0 components (or Shimano XT or XTR), both are full suspension and made out of bamboo.

    These two bikes would both be of a high enough quality to compete with other high end bikes from other companies respectively (ex: AM/trail bamboo vs Trek Fuel EX and XC bamboo vs Santa cruz blur XC). The bamboo bikes would weigh a little but not significantly more than those two examples. Both high end bicycles.

    The bamboo frames would be lugged frames with natural fiber wrapping lugs (i.e. not carbon lugs).


    MTBR community, how do you think the bicycling industry and customers of other bikes of that caliber would receive these two bikes? How would they react to claims of bamboo bikes measuring up in performance to other high end bikes? Would the material of bamboo assuage your decision to demo or purchase bikes such as these?

    I ask of thee MTBR...
    To answer you question about how would I react to claims that the bamboo bikes perform as well as current Al and carbon fiber FS bikes, I'd be skeptical as hell. I'd need to see them out there for a while with a good track record before I would consider one.

    Frankly, I don't see the point of a bamboo full suspension bike.

    However, I would be willing to test one for you and write up an honest review.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  8. #8
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    shiggy - yea I lowballed it a little too much, the components and wheels alone would be about $1800. looking at about $2300-$3300. I changed it.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by bboyuseless View Post
    shiggy - yea I lowballed it a little too much, the components and wheels alone would be about $1800. looking at about $2300-$3300. I changed it.
    Still pretty low for a suspension frame, even if you sold consumer direct. You have a lot of development time and cost to deal with.
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  10. #10
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    yea that's some of the benefit of the bamboo is its ability to be easier on the wallet due to its natural availability and not a substance that needs to be processed into a form like carbon fiber. Another thing that could help or hinder is a lot of people tend to naturally say things like "you pay for what you get." which might not be applicable if something like this is R&D'ed correctly and works as it says, you know what i mean?

    Some people see cheap price=cheap bike off the cuff. That coupled with the hesitance of buying a frame made of bamboo are potential marketing roadblocks i foresee with a venture such as this.

  11. #11
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    Will the warranty cover Panda attack?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Bamboo bike company hypothetical situation-070706_panda_zoo_021.jpg  


  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bboyuseless View Post
    yea that's some of the benefit of the bamboo is its ability to be easier on the wallet due to its natural availability and not a substance that needs to be processed into a form like carbon fiber. Another thing that could help or hinder is a lot of people tend to naturally say things like "you pay for what you get." which might not be applicable if something like this is R&D'ed correctly and works as it says, you know what i mean?

    Some people see cheap price=cheap bike off the cuff. That coupled with the hesitance of buying a frame made of bamboo are potential marketing roadblocks i foresee with a venture such as this.
    But you have more limitations with the natural form which can affect the function of the design.
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  13. #13
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    Why is bamboo an advantage over current materials? If is cheaper to produce then it should be cheaper to buy. If not what is the advantage to the rider?
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '19 Ibis Ripmo, XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  14. #14
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    I like the stuff. I have seen a bamboo bike up close. Very cool.

    Bamboo has to be cured properly so it is strong and does not split. That can take months. Bamboo is also graded for quality.

    It is, I think, a poor choice for a highly stressed mountain bike frame. The size and strength of the bamboo pieces will vary quite a bit. It is mostly good for the cool factor, and to form a shape over which carbon or fiberglass can be laminated. It will be labor intensive as well, as the diameters of each end of each strut will not only be different diameters, they will not actually be round.
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  15. #15
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    no, just no

  16. #16
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    Chances are some big names have looked into this and decided they can not be profitable with bamboo.

    As for how the industry and community would react if bamboo bikes were economically viable and worked their way into the mainstream, I think the history of carbon fiber is analogous: there would be a lot of skepticism prior to widespread acceptance.

    -Pete
    I can barely get my mouth around it.

  17. #17
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    Bamboo. Why not curly maple?

  18. #18
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    You can make your own like I did! Bike manufactures don't like this... I guess it could=more competition and lost sales if everyone can make their own bike. (I know it's not a mtn bike...)





    Last edited by PatMcF79; 01-08-2013 at 07:27 PM.

  19. #19
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    I love the bamboo floor I put down in my living room
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  20. #20
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    Hey, I just found your 2year old thread on the frame building board and your blog:
    http://forums.mtbr.com/frame-buildin...ke-695716.html
    Bambusa Bicycletta

    Changed my answer to absolutely no.
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  21. #21
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    Shiggy: Are you insinuating that that blog has some relation to my hypothetical scenario post?

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteezusChrist View Post
    Will the warranty cover Panda attack?


    On the serious side, would never buy one. I don't care how inexpensive they get.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by bboyuseless View Post
    Shiggy: Are you insinuating that that blog has some relation to my hypothetical scenario post?
    Well, it is your blog, isn't it? And it shows exactly what you are describing.
    Last edited by kapusta; 01-12-2013 at 08:55 AM.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    Well, it is your blog, isn't it? And it shows exactly what you are describing.
    It is my blog and It is not describing it whatsoever. Does it have two bikes on it being built? Did you read it? Is there any mention of starting a company or ambitions to do such within the blog? If there was any specific relation to this would I have not mentioned it?

    Answer to all of those questions is no if you had any doubts. In two years, I've done countless hours of research, spent weeks on end in machine shops, enrolled in graduate schools and in general learned exponentially more information than what that blog reflects. I would be out of my mind to offer that bicycle design or process or materials as blueprints to base a business off of. Since you have no idea who I am, why would you assume that I would do as much? Especially since I have not hidden that blog in any way, so the only logical explanation is that I SPECIFICALLY did not include it for a REASON.

    That blog was 1: an experiment, 2: a portfolio bolsterer, and 3: my second frame ever.

    If you have a specific question, then say it. Like hey! How much do you know about this bamboo stuff? Instead of digging up old history and assuming things.

    Lets stick to the topic shall we?

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by bboyuseless View Post
    It is my blog and It is not describing it whatsoever. Does it have two bikes on it being built? Did you read it? Is there any mention of starting a company or ambitions to do such within the blog? If there was any specific relation to this would I have not mentioned it?

    Answer to all of those questions is no if you had any doubts. In two years, I've done countless hours of research, spent weeks on end in machine shops, enrolled in graduate schools and in general learned exponentially more information than what that blog reflects. I would be out of my mind to offer that bicycle design or process or materials as blueprints to base a business off of. Since you have no idea who I am, why would you assume that I would do as much? Especially since I have not hidden that blog in any way, so the only logical explanation is that I SPECIFICALLY did not include it for a REASON.

    That blog was 1: an experiment, 2: a portfolio bolsterer, and 3: my second frame ever.

    If you have a specific question, then say it. Like hey! How much do you know about this bamboo stuff? Instead of digging up old history and assuming things.

    Lets stick to the topic shall we?
    Whoa, dude! Settle down. I was just pointing out the obvious.

    You start a "hypothetical" thread on a public mtb discussion site which any reasonable person would interpret as referring to a project you are working on and looking to market, and you have posts on that same site with links to a blog that show the same thing you are describing. Then you throw a fit when people assume these are somehow related? I think you might want to re-examine your marketing and PR.

    You do realize that if someone actually finds your idea interesting (which I wold assume you would hope for), that they are going to try and find more info on it, right?

    If you don't want people making the assumption that these are somehow related, I would suggest taking down the blog or not come on here talking about the project.

    Or, better yet, you can just be up front and say what you are actually doing (rather than a cryptic "hypothetical" situation), and point out up front that the info out there represents your efforts 2 years ago.

    Good luck. I'll still be a tester if you want.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  26. #26
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    ...wow. typical MTBR explosive threads...

    So, I'm curious, have you got any video of how your bike from the blog rides? got any metrics on it, such as leverage ratios, geometry, a bike you based it upon, etc?

    I think your concept bike is interesting, as I never thought about bamboo as a material for a suspension frame.
    I Think that bamboo is better suited to road bikes and cruisers and hardtails.
    Why did you want to build a suspension frame from bamboo? What do you think the advantages would be? Is it just a "something different" concept? I'm not trolling or trying to be antagonistic, simply curious about your project, and your hypothetical concept of a bamboo mtn bike company.

  27. #27
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    This post is a hypothetical scenario. That blog has nothing to do with the hypothetical product referred to here. The info out there does represent my efforts 2 years ago but do not have any relation to this post. Plain and clear. I seem to have pointed that out in my previous comment, not sure why you don't believe me.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by bboyuseless View Post
    This post is a hypothetical scenario. That blog has nothing to do with the hypothetical product referred to here. The info out there does represent my efforts 2 years ago but do not have any relation to this post. Plain and clear. I seem to have pointed that out in my previous comment, not sure why you don't believe me.
    Who said I don't believe you? I was simply pointing out that that's the way it appears, so you might want to clarify that up front instead of throwing a fit at people after the fact.

    Most marketers go the route of taking proactive measures to make sure they are not mus-understood. In this case if you don't want anyone associating that blog post with your product, you should probably remove it, or preface it with a clarification that this has nothing to do with the very reason that some people might be looking it up for.

    Or not, it's your business. I suppose lashing out at people who make the unfortunate move of showing enough interest in your product to look at your blog is another strategy.
    Last edited by kapusta; 01-12-2013 at 11:48 AM.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by bboyuseless View Post
    This post is a hypothetical scenario. That blog has nothing to do with the hypothetical product referred to here. The info out there does represent my efforts 2 years ago but do not have any relation to this post. Plain and clear. I seem to have pointed that out in my previous comment, not sure why you don't believe me.
    I did not try to dig up that old thread. It surfaced on its own a few days ago..

    And yes, your blog and previous posts are related, like it or not. Same concept from the same source.
    Unless you can give us more than just words, this is the only evidence we have to judge your ideas.

    Nobody can buy a hypothetical product. Anyone can throw out ideas that sound good but could never be produced.

    In other words: Show us the bike.
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  30. #30
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    deleted due to lack of relevancy in light of later posts.
    Last edited by Iridethedirt; 01-12-2013 at 12:28 PM.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iridethedirt View Post
    ...wow. typical MTBR explosive threads...

    So, I'm curious, have you got any video of how your bike from the blog rides? got any metrics on it, such as leverage ratios, geometry, a bike you based it upon, etc?

    I think your concept bike is interesting, as I never thought about bamboo as a material for a suspension frame.
    I Think that bamboo is better suited to road bikes and cruisers and hardtails.
    Why did you want to build a suspension frame from bamboo? What do you think the advantages would be? Is it just a "something different" concept? I'm not trolling or trying to be antagonistic, simply curious about your project, and your hypothetical concept of a bamboo mtn bike company.
    There is no overwhelming evidence that a bike frame made of bamboo would benefit from a full suspension setup. At the time I created the blog bike I wanted to try something new. I have ridden it in its intended setting, It rode well, was too flexy on the rear end though and the leverage ratio was way to high. Almost 1:1 in fact. Being my second frame, I made many mistakes, one being I skimped on material for the bottom bracket which I found out the hard way. It survived about 4 months of beating (did not get any video, sorry). I was riding through a parking lot to a trail and the aluminum tore from the fiber. This was because of two reasons, 1: the skimping and 2: fiber direction. I am repairing it, but simultaneously, I am experimenting with injection molding procedures. I will be abandoning that project as the design is flawed and will not be repairing it. I am going to be making a new bamboo bike for portfolio purposes again.

    The process I used for that bike will be discontinued, along with the fiber type, the epoxy brand, the aluminum alloys, the design blueprints, and the bamboo species.

    I believe that given the nature of bamboo and the fiber I will use in the future (bamboo's superior ability to absorb trail vibration and small bumps) I may be able to come up with a suspension setup to compliment the bamboo properties. Hopefully producing a bike that uses the frame as a suspension component of sorts and a shock that concentrates more on large hits. More experiments and research will yield whether this is true or not. I find it interesting so I plan to continue even if it ends up not being possible.

    Bamboo is cheap, it is strong, it is renewable and it is plentiful. The fiber i'm using now (and the fiber I use in the future) is cheap, it is strong (it varies, but on average has the tensile strength of 7075 T6) and is also renewable and plentiful. Epoxy can be expensive potentially but that is the necessary evil of composites. This recipe, may be able to yield a cheap frame with the strength of an aluminum frame of the same class with lighter weight.

    The business aspect of the hypothetical post: I have no current plans to bring a business like this to the table. It is not even conjecture. I was bored and wanted to see if people's apprehension of a new material would dissuade them from buying a bike made of bamboo.

    It's offensive to hear someone say that something I've spent a lot of effort on has changed someone's opinion of something negatively. Especially when I would explicitly like the two things to not have relation to each other.

    On another note, even if the blog and the hypothetical business post were connected, would you look down on apple and refuse to buy their new mac books because you knew they made this?
    Last edited by bboyuseless; 01-12-2013 at 12:04 PM.

  32. #32
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    Hypothetically, I'd consider buying a bamboo bike if It were well-engineered, and was field tested and survived. I would not buy one from a sales guy who got pissed off at me for asking questions about it.
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  33. #33
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    Build it and they will come. Lets see the real deal, enough of the hypothetical.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by bboyuseless View Post
    There is no overwhelming evidence that a bike frame made of bamboo would benefit from a full suspension setup. At the time I created the blog bike I wanted to try something new. I have ridden it in its intended setting, It rode well, was too flexy on the rear end though and the leverage ratio was way to high. Almost 1:1 in fact. Being my second frame, I made many mistakes, one being I skimped on material for the bottom bracket which I found out the hard way. It survived about 4 months of beating (did not get any video, sorry). I was riding through a parking lot to a trail and the aluminum tore from the fiber. This was because of two reasons, 1: the skimping and 2: fiber direction. I am repairing it, but simultaneously, I am experimenting with injection molding procedures. I will be abandoning that project as the design is flawed and will not be repairing it. I am going to be making a new bamboo bike for portfolio purposes again.

    The process I used for that bike will be discontinued, along with the fiber type, the epoxy brand, the aluminum alloys, the design blueprints, and the bamboo species.

    I believe that given the nature of bamboo and the fiber I will use in the future (bamboo's superior ability to absorb trail vibration and small bumps) I may be able to come up with a suspension setup to compliment the bamboo properties. Hopefully producing a bike that uses the frame as a suspension component of sorts and a shock that concentrates more on large hits. More experiments and research will yield whether this is true or not. I find it interesting so I plan to continue even if it ends up not being possible.

    Bamboo is cheap, it is strong, it is renewable and it is plentiful. The fiber i'm using now (and the fiber I use in the future) is cheap, it is strong (it varies, but on average has the tensile strength of 7075 T6) and is also renewable and plentiful. Epoxy can be expensive potentially but that is the necessary evil of composites. This recipe, may be able to yield a cheap frame with the strength of an aluminum frame of the same class with lighter weight.

    The business aspect of the hypothetical post: I have no current plans to bring a business like this to the table. It is not even conjecture. I was bored and wanted to see if people's apprehension of a new material would dissuade them from buying a bike made of bamboo.

    It's offensive to hear someone say that something I've spent a lot of effort on has changed someone's opinion of something negatively. Especially when I would explicitly like the two things to not have relation to each other.

    On another note, even if the blog and the hypothetical business post were connected, would you look down on apple and refuse to buy their new mac books because you knew they made this?

    You took offense at one person's response to your concept, and something you've built after you put it online? DUUUUUUDE!? you've gotta get over that. no matter WHAT you build someone WILL hate it. I'm a fabricator, a photographer, and (i hate saying it..) an "artist"... some people love what I produce, some people don't. That's how it is. That's how innovation goes. you try stuff, and some of it works, some doesn't. don't let somebody's opinion of a project you tried, and completed, drag you into this type of attitude towards others who just want to chat about your concepts. Here is an example of how you COULD have responded:
    "Yeah, that blog, and the old post are from the very beginning of my journey into using bamboo as a frame material, I appreciate your interest enough to dig that up, but I've come a long way from there, and acquired lots of education on the topic from reputable sources/classes. HOWEVER, I would like to set that aside as something else, and address only the topic of this thread, excluding my previous works, and treating this as JUST a hypothetical, I will start another thread to discuss my trials and tribulations of working in bamboo, the metrics of said material, and my previous projects working with it. Now, lets focus simply on the hypothetical, of high end bamboo mountain bikes, and how the cycling industry, and marketplace would receive such a product."

    See.... no animosity, negativity... and you invite further discussion, steering the topic back on track. You've got to learn diplomacy if you ever hope to get anywhere as an entrepreneur.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iridethedirt View Post
    You took offense at one person's response to your concept, and something you've built after you put it online? DUUUUUUDE!? you've gotta get over that. no matter WHAT you build someone WILL hate it. I'm a fabricator, a photographer, and (i hate saying it..) an "artist"... some people love what I produce, some people don't. That's how it is. That's how innovation goes. you try stuff, and some of it works, some doesn't. don't let somebody's opinion of a project you tried, and completed, drag you into this type of attitude towards others who just want to chat about your concepts. Here is an example of how you COULD have responded:
    "Yeah, that blog, and the old post are from the very beginning of my journey into using bamboo as a frame material, I appreciate your interest enough to dig that up, but I've come a long way from there, and acquired lots of education on the topic from reputable sources/classes. HOWEVER, I would like to set that aside as something else, and address only the topic of this thread, excluding my previous works, and treating this as JUST a hypothetical, I will start another thread to discuss my trials and tribulations of working in bamboo, the metrics of said material, and my previous projects working with it. Now, lets focus simply on the hypothetical, of high end bamboo mountain bikes, and how the cycling industry, and marketplace would receive such a product."

    See.... no animosity, negativity... and you invite further discussion, steering the topic back on track. You've got to learn diplomacy if you ever hope to get anywhere as an entrepreneur.
    I didn't really take offense at him not liking it, I took offense at him relating those two things that I preferred not to be related. On the flip-side, he could have asked if that blog had something to do with this hypothetical post, then there would have been no problems but I can't change people, I can only change myself. So I say this:

    You are right and I thank you for the honest advice. I've got a lot to learn about diplomacy. I've got a lot to learn about a lot of things for that matter.
    Last edited by bboyuseless; 01-12-2013 at 12:56 PM.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    I suppose lashing out at people who make the unfortunate move of showing enough interest in your product to look at your blog is another strategy.
    See, that isn't the product (on the blog) and the initial problematic comment was:

    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    Hey, I just found your 2year old thread on the frame building board and your blog:
    http://forums.mtbr.com/frame-buildin...ke-695716.html
    Bambusa Bicycletta

    Changed my answer to absolutely no.
    This doesn't really seem like an 'interest' in my "product." And does no one else see how this could be offensive?

  37. #37
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by bboyuseless View Post
    See, that isn't the product (on the blog) and the initial problematic comment was:



    This doesn't really seem like an 'interest' in my "product." And does no one else see how this could be offensive?
    Some people are easily offended.

    Rather than disclaim your old work, embrace it. Talk about what you have learned and what you still need to learn (which is likely more than you can guess. A 1:1 suspension ratio is extremely low not high).

    On another note, even if the blog and the hypothetical business post were connected, would you look down on apple and refuse to buy their new mac books because you knew they made this?
    Poor example. Apple has a history of products and advancement, with actual functioning items, old and new, good and bad.
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  38. #38
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    I found this pic on mtbr a while ago but can't find original thread

  39. #39
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lupob6 View Post


    I found this pic on mtbr a while ago but can't find original thread
    That bike (built by others) is in the thread the OP started 2years ago. Note that the rearend (carbon or aluminum) is from a GT.
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  40. #40
    since 4/10/2009
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    I'd buy a bamboo bike. A bamboo mtb, no. if I bought a bamboo bike, it would be only for nice weather and paved paths. maybe for commuting.

    I have a source of bamboo and I'm going to build a hammock stand out of it. it's a good material, but I think a mtb would be a bit much.

  41. #41
    mtbr member
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    I also have access to bamboo, a bunch of it. I grows like weeds in the right environment. I make walking sticks out of it. It's strong and light, but they don't last very long. I would never consider making a MTB out of it.

  42. #42
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    Well done and keep at it - never give up

    I think the OP illustrates what is so fantastic about the human race - innovation and ingenuity at its best. How much work went into that prototype! How many hours of dedication? When you have a dream and you follow it like this, you have ALL of my respect and admiration. Great work - repped

    In terms of the concept, just my 2c worth:

    I have owned and ridden many different types of bikes. Yes I have a fancy full suspension AM bike that I would take to the Alps or Scotland (or I guess the Rockies if I had the chance) to "go anywhere" with my mates, or on a MTB holiday.
    But my favourite bike, and the one I ride the most, by far, is a humble 2nd-hand rigid singlespeed. It has a steel frame and wide tyres because that provides me with all the "suspension" I need.
    My point is this: as a layman who knows nothing about bamboo, it just seems to me that it would offer more "compliance" than CF or aluminium - so it seems like it would be better suited to a rigid, or at least hardtail, bike set-up, than a full-sus.
    If you could produce a rigid, singlespeed 29er capable of taking big tyres, I honestly might buy one. It would be cool.
    But I wouldn't buy a bamboo full-sus until it had been proven after say 4-5 years, with only successful reviews, because I need to KNOW that my FS is bomb-proof.

  43. #43
    No Stranger to danger....
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    I dont wanna be a black santa, but i think it would be a total failure..

    There is nothing bamboo has to trump carbon or alloy, you might be able to make enough to sell a few, but who in their right mind would buy a 2-3k bamboo bike when there is great carbon and alloy bikes out there, we are in the year 2013 not 1913.

    Why would anybody buy a bambo full sus for 2k, it defies logic..

    I totally understand the challange and why somebody would want to build one, and its a cool idea, but getting back to reality apart from the novalty of it, there is no reason why one would buy a bike made of bamboo, its just not the best or smartest material to build a bike out of in 2013.

    I know bamboo is a wonder product with some amazing capabilities, but i can think of a few things id rather have a bike built out of if im spending 2 or 3k..
    cheers
    Dont ever let the truth get in the way of a funny story....:cool:

  44. #44
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    Won't there be enough flex in bamboo HT to make a bamboo FS bike completely pointless?

    -S

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