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  1. #1
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    Am I the only one?

    (I dont know where to post this).

    I ride to work, on a freewheeled fixie.
    before that when i was younger, it was old 90’s mtb’s.

    today i went to a couple bike stores and tried 29’ers, 27.5, midbikes etc...
    they all just seem sooo big and cumbersome. Clunky and chunky.

    its like going from a ford festiva to a c-600 (which i literally did).

    i dont like it.

    id rather buy a stump-jumper circa the 90’s or so and spend the big money to modernize it. They are a nice size for me not clunky and not giant. And thats weird for me to say because im 6’6 and 260lbs or so.

    but my worry is that is the frame on those capable? Will I mangle and break it at mid-level riding with some downhill and jumps?

  2. #2
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    The used bike market is HUGE. Get out there and pick out an older ride in good shape that fits your needs. You don’t have to buy into all the hype just because everyone else is.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  3. #3
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    Say more about what you want to ride and skills. Some downhill and jumps is a big category. 6'4" here, I run a 29er enduro, 6 " of travel, not much in the way of drops or jumps for me. Go to a festival or event, demo a bunch to get a feel for what you want.

  4. #4
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    Can you imagine how big they are for someone who is 5' 6"?
    Modern bikes fare poorly on switchbacks. What we used to just pedal around now requires advanced skills or putting a foot down. The long wheelbase may be nice for the steep downhill stuff, not so much going up unless you (and your knees) like out of the saddle climbing.


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  5. #5
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    Freewheeled fixie? Isn't that an oxymoron?
    Do the math.

  6. #6
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    Hmmm.
    Id say some entry level to midlevel downhill.
    Nothing too crazy yet.

  7. #7
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    Yes, no it isnt. Hahahahaha.
    Good catch!

  8. #8
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    Are you looking to replace your work commuter, but don't like the idea of a larger uncomfortable mountain bike as a street vehicle?

    Or are you simply comparing a modern day mountain bike, that you intend to use for mountain bike purposes, against the current bike you're riding?

    My girlfriend would continually tell me how big mine is (2016 FSR) compared to her 26" Gary Fisher. Until the day her small frame Julina arrived, realizing that even the small frame "womens specific" bike leaned bar to bar with me.

    She hasn't ridding the old 26 in the 1.5 years since Juliana arrived.

  9. #9
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    AndyTiedye has it right.
    Newer bikes feel like dumptrucks.
    I dont like it.

    My question is more: will the frame hold up to the abuse?
    Can i take the 2-5’ drops, can i bomb the hills without snapping the frame?

    Im ok with spending the $$ to bring the components up to par.
    Im not looking to race or trying to turn the fastest times, just have some good ole fun.

  10. #10
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    Just remember, mid 90's stumpjumper, current day components, a lot of stuff won't fit (EG wheels and forks)
    All the gear and no idea.

  11. #11
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    Not comparing new bikes to my commuter. Thats apples to oranges in so many ways. Especially since mine is road. Its a fuji grand tour.


    Im comparing mtb like the garry fishers to the bikes of todays.
    I entend to use the bikes for mountainbiking.
    But i say that and the mountain bikers look at me crazy.
    I guess the proper term these days is “singletrack”...?

    Remember bombing hills as a teen.....

    https://youtu.be/48_YlRxH9WM

  12. #12
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    Rent a modern bike for a day and see if you feel the same as you do sitting in a cramped showroom.

    I'm not attempting to talk you into one -it just sounds like you have sat on one in a store and concluded that the bike is too big.

    My 2016 FSR is a monster truck compared to my 2000 26" stumpjumper hardtail.

    I've ridden both bikes on the same trails, started with the hard tail for several years.

    I rode the old bike within the past year and was so uncomfortable on it that I was timid to do anything aside from just ride it without having playful fun. I felt cramped. I was sitting over the front wheel. My body position was all wrong from being so cramped up.

    It's all about what we get used to. I have a crap ton of fun on the full suspension bike despite how big it is. When I ride it though, I do not feel it is a big bike anymore.

    I bought a new hard tail a few weeks ago. The primary numbers are almost the same between my two, both dwarfing the 26" hardtail.

    Things to consider on an older bike:
    Well, really just one thing. What is the condition of the old frame and welds. Are you more confident riding a new aluminum bike on a 2' drop, or equally confident riding off a 2' drop on a 10 year old bike with compromised welds.

    If that's all you have to ride, that's totally fine. But the new bikes are a lot of fun, despite the amount of floor space they take up in a showroom.

    And of course the final consideration -a used, older bike, is much more affordable than the giants on the showroom floor. However, you have to next ask yourself if paying $1000 for an out of date bike is worth it. Did the older bike have a tapered headset? That makes your fork options lesser, and the travel will be far less than you can get today as well. How well do the brakes work with the old technology. No big deal, you can always just buy new brakes to get the stopping power back. Chances are, the brakes on the used bike are going to be more than adequate, for a while until you out-grow the bike.


    I remember being pretty blown away how large my stumpy was when I first rode it. Higher center of gravity. A lot longer of a fall before you hit the ground. All that good stuff. However, I'd do it again (well I did do it again) if I had the choice.


    And no....you are not the only one. There have been a few similar threads just recently asking the question of why are new bikes so much bigger.

  13. #13
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    The video was pretty cool.

    Cheap plastic pedals. Small brakes. An updated Specialized stem cap. Cushy seat.
    It got the job done and the rider was having fun.

    It was interesting to see how compact the bike is -for as steep as it is an having to get back on the bike the camera still barely catches the bars. Modern day, the camera catches the head tube while seated.

    The rattles are reminiscent of my 2000...either chain slap or the rattly front derailleur cage.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    The used bike market is HUGE. Get out there and pick out an older ride in good shape that fits your needs. You don’t have to buy into all the hype just because everyone else is.
    Of course you don't have to, but it sure is fun!

    I agree with the DJ, look at used steel hardtails, something with a tapered headtube. Depending on your nape of the woods, you may not have a lot to choose from, a new Karate Monkey could be something to consider.

    https://surlybikes.com/bikes/karate_monkey
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by MiltonHavoc View Post
    Not comparing new bikes to my commuter. Thats apples to oranges in so many ways. Especially since mine is road. Its a fuji grand tour.


    Im comparing mtb like the garry fishers to the bikes of todays.
    I entend to use the bikes for mountainbiking.
    But i say that and the mountain bikers look at me crazy.
    I guess the proper term these days is “singletrack”...?

    Remember bombing hills as a teen.....

    https://youtu.be/48_YlRxH9WM
    If you're not just here to give us a 'the old ways are best' speech...any bike will go down that trail just fine. There are 3 year old kids casually sauntering up it. That's not what modern trail bikes are designed for. There are a few things where having a really short wheelbase is an advantage, especially on old school XC trails. However, the idea that the new longer bikes are clunky and cumbersome is BS.

    What are you doing that requires greater maneuverability than this...


  16. #16
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    Did you actually ride the bikes..on trails..for an extended period of time? Honestly it sounds like you might just be so used to what you're used to. Do a real demo on at least a few different bikes for a day or two. You'll probably adapt and never wanna go back. Seriously, just give em a fair shot..and make sure you're on the correct size. Modern bikes are soooo much more capable than any 90s bike. If afterwards, you still feel the same that's fine..but it'll be tough to upgrade anything on an older bike.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by MiltonHavoc View Post
    Not comparing new bikes to my commuter. Thats apples to oranges in so many ways. Especially since mine is road. Its a fuji grand tour.


    Im comparing mtb like the garry fishers to the bikes of todays.
    I entend to use the bikes for mountainbiking.
    But i say that and the mountain bikers look at me crazy.
    I guess the proper term these days is “singletrack”...?

    Remember bombing hills as a teen.....

    https://youtu.be/48_YlRxH9WM
    There's plenty of fun modern bikes. My current favorite is 29+ Surly Krampus with 3" tires. At your size I would think you'd really like the big hoops. I'm 6'3" 205 lbs and won't even consider a bike with smaller wheels for trail riding.

    I've ridden a lot of smaller wheel'd bikes and never found one that produced the fun factor of 29ers.

    Truth is you can have fun on any bike. There's lots of "modern" bikes available with limited amenities. If you want no suspension, one gear, and a durable frame it's available. Just don't ask for one with 26" wheels in XXL.
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  18. #18
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    Been mtb for probably over 25 years and rode lots of bikes. Newer bikes are much better, by far. If you are srious about biking get one. Just don't get sucked into thinking you need tons of travel.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by mik_git View Post
    Just remember, mid 90's stumpjumper, current day components, a lot of stuff won't fit (EG wheels and forks)
    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    ... look at used steel hardtails, something with a tapered headtube. Depending on your nape of the woods, you may not have a lot to choose from, a new Karate Monkey could be something to consider.

    https://surlybikes.com/bikes/karate_monkey
    Good advice here.

    A lot of updated stuff won't fit an old frame and/or be expensive to build up.

    Renting/borrowing a properly sized new bike is wise advice.

    Have fun shopping
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  20. #20
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    I rode 26" 1980s and 1990s mountain bikes forever and was the last among my friends and riding groups to make the move to more modern bikes. I have found that with some time in the saddle I can get used to any bike and many are improvements over the 1997 26" bike I thought was perfect at the time. I can't get the feel of a bike without some time in the saddle, so I always buy bikes that are a good deal and then ride them for a month or for a few hundred miles to see what I really think of it. If I like it I'll keep it, but otherwise I sell it and try something else.

    My bikes are all 29'ers that are between 7 and 10 years old, so they are still considered out-of-date by today's standards. However, they do not feel like dump trucks to me and are plenty maneuverable and reasonably light, and all purchased / built very inexpensively.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by MiltonHavoc View Post
    but my worry is that is the frame on those capable? Will I mangle and break it at mid-level riding with some downhill and jumps?
    At your size, you'll destroy a 90's hardtail trying to do jumps on it. Those bikes were pretty much all "cross country" bikes. "Downhill" back then wasn't in any way equivalent to downhill now.

    As an example, I have a local guide book for my area (western North Carolina) from 1993. Some of the trails I ride now existed back then, too. The recommended routes, though, don't resemble in the slightest the way we ride them now. Everything we ride now involves at minimum a singletrack descent, with lots of climbing on the gravel roads. In 1993, the recommendations were to climb the singletrack and then bomb down the gravel roads, almost invariably. And bikes back then were sketchy AF bombing down gravel roads at the speeds you can hit on those things. Short wheelbases, long-ass stems that put your weight too far over your front wheel, and so on.

    I agree that you need to get some bikes on actual trails. Yes, modern geo mtb's are going to feel substantially different from the bike you ride now as a commuter, as well as the old mtb's you rode as a kid. They're supposed to. I'm curious what bikes you actually tried, because even among modern bikes, there are a lot of differences depending on what the bike is designed for.

    And yes, you can find a used (but a whole lot more recent than the 1990's) bike that doesn't have as significant of a change that can still accept some relatively modern parts. A few niche brands still make bikes that are a little closer to older geometry. At this point, if you buy a mtb from the 1990's, you're best off riding it with a rigid fork and mostly period components otherwise, and riding it for what it is. A cross country bike that's not built to withstand jumping under a large, heavy rider who sounds like he's more or less a beginner mtb rider, anyway.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgltrak View Post
    However, they do not feel like dump trucks to me and are plenty maneuverable and reasonably light, and all purchased / built very inexpensively.
    I've ridden/demo'd lots of bikes (but have only owned a small number), and it's a rare few that I could say handled like dump trucks. Sure, there were plenty I didn't like for one reason or another, but "handling like a dump truck" barely rates as a major criticism for me. I agree about being able to adapt to just about anything (within reason) with some saddle time.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by MiltonHavoc View Post
    (I dont know where to post this).

    I ride to work, on a freewheeled fixie.
    before that when i was younger, it was old 90’s mtb’s.

    today i went to a couple bike stores and tried 29’ers, 27.5, midbikes etc...
    they all just seem sooo big and cumbersome. Clunky and chunky.

    its like going from a ford festiva to a c-600 (which i literally did).

    i dont like it.

    id rather buy a stump-jumper circa the 90’s or so and spend the big money to modernize it. They are a nice size for me not clunky and not giant. And thats weird for me to say because im 6’6 and 260lbs or so.

    but my worry is that is the frame on those capable? Will I mangle and break it at mid-level riding with some downhill and jumps?
    I was totally like this up until a few months ago.

    1. Size down if you want smaller/more playful. People do this all the time if that’s what they’re looking for. Being 6’6”, maybe swapping out a stem might change the fit considerably. Today’s bikes usually run 30-60mm stems for most folks. Mid-90s bikes all had 80-120mm stems, narrow bars, and bar ends. Different than today, which is the inverse.

    2. A bike from the 90s might be a bit old. Why not try one of the newer 26ers from 2010 to 2014? You can get them for a nice discount these days, and they’re still playful if you can find one that’s been sitting around.

    3. You can modernize an older frame, but you’ll have far less choices than if you had something more recent. It’s not impossible, just might require more research. However it’s doubtful you might find some of the newest stuff being able to work (like if you’re looking at the new shimano 12 speed stuff for example, those hub splines may not be available for 135mm non boost hubs).

    4. I still don’t like 29ers. Others do. Others are 26 inch until they die. Ride what you like Are you only test riding specialized? You only mentioned the stumpjumper, so I’m curious to if you got out to demo some bikes. There’s plenty of good things bikes out there, so I’m curious to what you’ve thrown a leg over. Like someone else said, go demo on the dirt. It would be interesting to get your thoughts.
    Guerrilla Gravity BAMF, Colorado Front Range

  24. #24
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    My guess is that it’s as much the feel of the handling as the actual size and fit of the bikes. There are still trails near me that would be well handled by a 21 pound hard tail sporting a 71 degree head angle.... stabbing into corners and spring out the other side. Not a lot of trails get built that way any more. It all kind of developed together.
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by MiltonHavoc View Post
    Hmmm.
    Id say some entry level to midlevel downhill.
    Nothing too crazy yet.
    Mid-level downhill IS crazy compared to cross-country riding. If you said you want to cruise flowy XC trails I'd say build up your 90s frame and have at it... But for downhill that's a really bad idea. You don't need a downhill bike, but you really want full suspension and a slackish head angle at least for downhill.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by MiltonHavoc View Post
    ...

    id rather buy a stump-jumper circa the 90’s or so and spend the big money to modernize it. ...
    I actually still have a 2004 aluminum SJ. It is my road bike for all intents and purposes. The last time I took it off road was shortly after I bought my 2007 Niner MCR9. I wanted to do a back-to-back comparison on a 9 mile rootfest here known as "The Thorn" mountain bike trail. The light bulb came on for me. Where the 29er rolled forward, the old SJ was much more up-and-down. It actually kind of surprised me how inefficient it felt. Yes, the SJ can twitch through turns faster than you can think, but with just a little extra body English, the 29er would do the same.

    I would NOT lend your 260# self my SJ.


    I think you would like a Karate Monkey.

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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fleas View Post
    I actually still have a 2004 aluminum SJ. It is my road bike for all intents and purposes. The last time I took it off road was shortly after I bought my 2007 Niner MCR9. I wanted to do a back-to-back comparison on a 9 mile rootfest here known as "The Thorn" mountain bike trail. The light bulb came on for me. Where the 29er rolled forward, the old SJ was much more up-and-down. It actually kind of surprised me how inefficient it felt. Yes, the SJ can twitch through turns faster than you can think, but with just a little extra body English, the 29er would do the same.

    I would NOT lend your 260# self my SJ.


    I think you would like a Karate Monkey.

    -F
    ________________________________________________
    Quote Originally Posted by MiltonHavoc View Post
    ...

    id rather buy a stump-jumper circa the 90’s or so and spend the big money to modernize it. ...
    ________________________________________________

    Plus it’s a futile effort and a waste of money to “spend the big bucks” to try to modernize an old bike. If you do by an older bike don’t throw big bucks at it to “try” to modernize it. A tweak here and there with mid level components but please don’t go crazy. It’s still an old geometry small wheeled bike.
    Last edited by DIRTJUNKIE; 1 Week Ago at 03:13 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by MiltonHavoc View Post
    (I dont know where to post this).

    I ride to work, on a freewheeled fixie.
    before that when i was younger, it was old 90’s mtb’s.

    today i went to a couple bike stores and tried 29’ers, 27.5, midbikes etc...
    they all just seem sooo big and cumbersome. Clunky and chunky.

    its like going from a ford festiva to a c-600 (which i literally did).

    i dont like it.

    id rather buy a stump-jumper circa the 90’s or so and spend the big money to modernize it. They are a nice size for me not clunky and not giant. And thats weird for me to say because im 6’6 and 260lbs or so.

    but my worry is that is the frame on those capable? Will I mangle and break it at mid-level riding with some downhill and jumps?
    maybe something like this will work for you (Jones Bicycles):

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=M6CPiUyrTXo

  29. #29
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    Yup. You get used to it. That's all. Then the old bikes ride like shit.

  30. #30
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    260# plus 5' drops and jumps on an old hardtail or rigid bike would make me bet on a catastrophic failure eventually, unless you have a LOT of finesse (and even then, physics is physics).

    Change is hard but you should do it. The new full suspension bikes are made for the type of riding you're wanting to do.

  31. #31
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    To the OP, you may need to consider a custom bike. Chat with a custom/semi-custom builder like Ventana (Sherwood Gibson). He may be able to put you on a nimble handling frame (I am paraphrasing your preferences) with today's technology.

    There are many other custom builders out there. I only have experience with Ventana; been riding some iteration of a Ventana since 2003.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finch Platte View Post
    Yup. You get used to it. That's all. Then the old bikes ride like shit.
    Yep. Most of us started on those old bikes and are well aware of how they feel... I probably wouldn't be riding at all, and absolutely couldn't be riding the way I do currently, if I was still on them.

  33. #33
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    I still want to know what a "freewheeled fixie" is. That's like a rigid full-suspension or a 10-speed singlespeed.

  34. #34
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    Maybe he used the term "freewheel" in the "fancy-free" sense of the word?

    "I'm just freewheeling through life, not a care in the world."

  35. #35
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    You couldn't pay me to pick a 30 year old bike over a modern bike. Modern bike tech and bikes are so good, they're light years ahead of the old bikes.
    Last edited by matadorCE; 1 Week Ago at 02:56 PM.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    I still want to know what a "freewheeled fixie" is.
    a singlespeed?

    I have started wondering if OP is on a too-small sized bike already. I encountered a few folks during my bike shop days trying out a "new bike" for the first time in a long time, and after talking to them about their current bike, learned they were riding one too small. and in at least some of those situations, the rider HATED the way a right-sized bike felt.

    I would bet that at 6'6, OP has some odd body proportions (most really tall guys I've met, ridden with, and worked with did) that make for some strange bike fits that might be compounding the issue.

  37. #37
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    Humans are highly adaptable creatures. Get a rental or borrow a bike and put some miles and hours on it, it may grow on you.
    Wanted, SRAM GX 2x11 rear derailleur

    It ain't supposed to be easy.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    I still want to know what a "freewheeled fixie" is. That's like a rigid full-suspension or a 10-speed singlespeed.
    A fixie (which is a style of bike separate from just being fixed gear, at least in some circles) that has had a freewheel put on it... Not that complex, or funny.

  39. #39
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    So...OP prefers a circa 1990s StumpJumper over anything built today...Hmmm...

    If I were still riding my 1999 StumpJumper, I would be riding with no teeth. That death trap of an FSR-XC was undoubtedly THE worst bike geo-wise I have owned in my life. I had multiple rides with multiple OTB incidents on a single ride. It's the only bike I have owned which led to a broken helmet.

    2 buddies of mine had the same bike. Same result. We all ditched them after the first season, thanking the biking Gods that we survived with no major injuries. We are all still avid bikers. More stoked than ever, actually.

    Am I the only one?-image-2017-06-03-10.56-am-1-.jpg

    Buy what you want but to suggest that a circa 1990s bike is better than the current generation seems to me to be a silly argument, on countless fronts.

    Answering your question, I don't suspect you are the only one OP. But I do think that you may have difficulty finding many legitimate enthusiasts who would agree with your position.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDwayyo View Post
    A fixie (which is a style of bike separate from just being fixed gear, at least in some circles) that has had a freewheel put on it... Not that complex, or funny.
    You mean a singlespeed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    You mean a singlespeed.
    Of course, but is it really that hard to understand what he's saying? A fixie is not the same as a track bike or a fixed gear mountain bike and yet they're all fixed gear.

    Sheesh guys, the dude is trying to say 90s mountain bikes are better than modern and you want to harp on him about incorrectly (by your standards anyway) using the term fixie?

  42. #42
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    Apparently there's unclear communication going on.

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    You may be the only one...

    I'm 6'4" 220lbs and have been riding in the woods since the 80's. I saw your vid...we don't have flow like that here (CT)...everything is tight and technical narrow singletrack through trees, rockpiles, streams, etc. For years I rode old school bikes (steel frame, no fork, rim brakes, 26") and eventually upgraded to a fork, mech discs, etc. Since 2001 it's been full susp bikes...all with alu XL frames and they take an incredible beating. I have broken 2-3 frames but some designs are absolutely bulletproof. The 2012 Santa Cruz Heckler was awesome, and hopefully the 2018 Kona Process 153 that I've beaten on for the last year will continue to be.

    You can ride what you want but once you get out and REALLY try one that's properly fit and set up for you there's no comparison. I would still be having fun on an old school bike but it's just so much better on a modern bike.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MiltonHavoc View Post
    (I dont know where to post this).

    I ride to work, on a freewheeled fixie.
    before that when i was younger, it was old 90’s mtb’s.

    today i went to a couple bike stores and tried 29’ers, 27.5, midbikes etc...
    they all just seem sooo big and cumbersome. Clunky and chunky.

    its like going from a ford festiva to a c-600 (which i literally did).

    i dont like it.

    id rather buy a stump-jumper circa the 90’s or so and spend the big money to modernize it. They are a nice size for me not clunky and not giant. And thats weird for me to say because im 6’6 and 260lbs or so.

    but my worry is that is the frame on those capable? Will I mangle and break it at mid-level riding with some downhill and jumps?
    Buy a Jones. It will fit into your need for a less modern ideal but comes with more modern geometry. I look at it akin to riding my old Turner XC fs bike but with nice modern components. I am sure there are other bikes out there that are like this as well but at your size I would go new and find that specific unicorn bike that works for what you are looking for.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDwayyo View Post
    Of course, but is it really that hard to understand what he's saying? A fixie is not the same as a track bike or a fixed gear mountain bike and yet they're all fixed gear.

    Sheesh guys, the dude is trying to say 90s mountain bikes are better than modern and you want to harp on him about incorrectly (by your standards anyway) using the term fixie?
    Yes, this is mtbr after all.

    So what defines a "fixie", no brakes and not the geo of a track bike, with clipped and flipped handlebar? I guess a fixed/free hub could be considered a "freewheeled fixie". I've got one of those. But I refer to it as my "fixed gear" 'cause I don't want to seem trendy (and it has brakes front and rear and is actually CX geo).
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
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    Quote Originally Posted by MiltonHavoc View Post
    (I dont know where to post this).

    I ride to work, on a freewheeled fixie.
    before that when i was younger, it was old 90’s mtb’s.

    today i went to a couple bike stores and tried 29’ers, 27.5, midbikes etc...
    they all just seem sooo big and cumbersome. Clunky and chunky.

    its like going from a ford festiva to a c-600 (which i literally did).

    i dont like it.

    id rather buy a stump-jumper circa the 90’s or so and spend the big money to modernize it. They are a nice size for me not clunky and not giant. And thats weird for me to say because im 6’6 and 260lbs or so.

    but my worry is that is the frame on those capable? Will I mangle and break it at mid-level riding with some downhill and jumps?
    Mid 90s Stumpy for a big guy wanting to do some DH? That should last at least a few weeks, if you can find one that has never been ridden before.
    Also, there is very little you can do to 'modernize' something like that. If you're really wanting used and 26" wheels, do like Stripes suggested and just go back 10 years instead of 20+.
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Yes, this is mtbr after all.

    So what defines a "fixie", no brakes and not the geo of a track bike, with clipped and flipped handlebar? I guess a fixed/free hub could be considered a "freewheeled fixie". I've got one of those. But I refer to it as my "fixed gear" 'cause I don't want to seem trendy (and it has brakes front and rear and is actually CX geo).
    Ya something like that... I've heard people distinguish a more typical bike that has been converted to fixed gear or a track bike from the hipster urban fixies. I know it's a bullshit distinction for the most part, but I think we can all picture what they were getting at so it has some merit.

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    I've been noticing a lot lately people seem to call riding their bike down any hill 'downhill.' Suddenly every trail with a downward cant to it is being called 'such and such downhill' around my local trails. Drives me crazy, because we have actual downhill trails so it can make things confusing.

    Is that what's happening here?

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDwayyo View Post
    I've been noticing a lot lately people seem to call riding their bike down any hill 'downhill.' Suddenly every trail with a downward cant to it is being called 'such and such downhill' around my local trails. Drives me crazy, because we have actual downhill trails so it can make things confusing.

    Is that what's happening here?
    Is it really that hard to understand what he’s saying? Ha!

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDwayyo View Post
    I've been noticing a lot lately people seem to call riding their bike down any hill 'downhill.' Suddenly every trail with a downward cant to it is being called 'such and such downhill' around my local trails. Drives me crazy, because we have actual downhill trails so it can make things confusing.

    Is that what's happening here?
    Yeah, look at the video he posted. He's talking about gravel paths.

    Btw, there's an old trail system that has a trail officially labeled as downhill but it's a section with larger hills than the rest of the system and you'll spend much more time climbing on it than descending...so it's not a totally new thing.

  51. #51
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    One word; perspective.

    Buy a BMX and six months later your oxymoron singlespeed will feel like a chopper. Or buy an Enduro bike and six months later your fixie will feel like a BMX.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    ...I guess a fixed/free hub could be considered a "freewheeled fixie". I've got one of those. But I refer to it as my "fixed gear" 'cause I don't want to seem trendy (and it has brakes front and rear and is actually CX geo).
    I have one too. My beloved (and now extinct) Kona Paddy Wagon. I have always referred to it as a fixie, even though it has brakes. Typing that, it does seem a little juvenile, trendy, and starving for acceptance. Or something. Yeah - maybe best to call it a fixed gear.

    Done.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDwayyo View Post
    Is that what's happening here?
    What's happening is the culture of mountain biking has gone astray.

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    The 2019s are starting to show up.
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    Quote Originally Posted by David R View Post
    One word; perspective.

    Buy a BMX and six months later your oxymoron singlespeed will feel like a chopper. Or buy an Enduro bike and six months later your fixie will feel like a BMX.
    I used to ride freestyle bmx and actually feel more comfortable jumping and playing around on the longer modern bikes than the smaller long stem mountain bikes. To me it's the older bikes with more road type geo that feel more cumbersome.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    I have one too. My beloved (and now extinct) Kona Paddy Wagon. I have always referred to it as a fixie, even though it has brakes. Typing that, it does seem a little juvenile, trendy, and starving for acceptance. Or something. Yeah - maybe best to call it a fixed gear.

    Done.
    This is a post I wrote just 3 days ago on rat rod bikes in a weird little tread about "faux fixie bikes"...


    "There really is a disconnect between what a fixed gear bicycle is and how it fits in with urban bike messenger/ fixie culture isn't there. The only distinction a fixie needs mechanically is a fixed drive train. I rode one for many years as a training tool. It rounded out my pedal stroke, built power, and taught me how to conserve momentum better. Mine was set up with brakes, wide drop bars, and the same clipless pedals I used on my mountain bikes. I became a better mountain biker because I trained on the fixie. None of that had anything to do with the urban "fixie culture" that Grant speaks to in his original post.

    FWIW my fixie, a Moto Messenger (love irony), did find it's way into the city. I sold it to a med. student at Yale in New Haven who was thrilled to find one that hadn't been beat to hell like a "fixie ".
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    Quote Originally Posted by MOJO K View Post
    This is a post I wrote just 3 days ago on rat rod bikes in a weird little tread about "faux fixie bikes"...


    "There really is a disconnect between what a fixed gear bicycle is and how it fits in with urban bike messenger/ fixie culture isn't there. The only distinction a fixie needs mechanically is a fixed drive train. I rode one for many years as a training tool. It rounded out my pedal stroke, built power, and taught me how to conserve momentum better. Mine was set up with brakes, wide drop bars, and the same clipless pedals I used on my mountain bikes. I became a better mountain biker because I trained on the fixie. None of that had anything to do with the urban "fixie culture" that Grant speaks to in his original post.

    FWIW my fixie, a Moto Messenger (love irony), did find it's way into the city. I sold it to a med. student at Yale in New Haven who was thrilled to find one that hadn't been beat to hell like a "fixie ".
    Interesting. And coincidental.

    My fixed gear/fixie is set up identically to how yours was. It is in deep with the downtown courier crew for 3 seasons worth of commuting each year. Apart from that, there is no crossover. My rides are generally cannabis-free, helmeted and brake-assisted.

    I will let them call their's "fixies", and will call mine "fixed gear".

    I bought mine to spice up the commute. To make it more challenging. Plus my Paddy Wagon is a beautiful steel "keeper for life" kinda bike. Just like my new Honzo Steel 30th Anniversary Edition (also bought to spice things up and even the playing field while trail riding with my daughter).

    Anyway, back on topic...

    1990s bikes crush the current generation of monster trucks...carry on.

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    I thought the same thing when seeing vid. I wouldn't call it downhill either. Just like XC, enduro, all mountain, crossbike, blah, blah, blah...everyone has their own view of what these terms mean.

    I think TheDwayyo is right...the term 'downhill' means different things to different riders. If you start at the top of a large hill or mountain and ride to the bottom, I can see how that could be considered downhill to some!
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    Quote Originally Posted by MiltonHavoc View Post
    Im comparing mtb like the garry fishers to the bikes of todays.
    I rode a '03 Fisher Suger 3+ for years (bought it new in '03). Still have it and still ride it from time to time. I hear what you're saying in your original post. New geometry does feel big and clunky (especially in the parking lot), at least at first. But with the right numbers, they really aren't. Key is geometry, and there are so many more variances these days. Try a 27.5" bike with a longer top tube and short chain stay. You will be surprised just how nimble and playful it is. Like others have said, ride one on a trail. My current bike has a much longer top tube and significantly shorter chain stay than the older Fisher. And it feels a LOT bigger just sitting on it. But when it's on the trail, taking on slow steep technical climbs and tight switchback, drops a few feet, grabbing air off tabletops, sweeping banked turns, screaming down steep rock gardens... man, the older Fisher has nothing on it. Don't get me wrong, the Sugar 3+ is still a great bike, honestly, but not near as stable, confident, fast as the new stuff. And much easier to tackle to rough stuff with.

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  60. #60
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    I'm with ya OP. I still love the feel of a 90s homegrown. I'm hoping to stumble across one someday, again.

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