Am I being unreasonable? Story of component warranties and direct to consumer bikes- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Am I being unreasonable? Story of component warranties and direct to consumer bikes

    Edit (2019/07/12): Issue resolved. I wanted to put this at the top of the page to make sure it was visible. So it appears SRAM will be paying the bike shop for their labor, and they have given us "upgraded" brakes, free of charge (giving guide ultimates in place of guide rsc brakes).

    The bike shop is Zion Cyclery, in Zion IL who I feel have been very nice and treated us well even though we bought direct to consumer bikes (not from their shop, obviously). I will be visiting them again and would recommend them to others. They could of turned us away or charged us more, but after a few phone calls they worked with SRAM and resolved the issue on bikes they didn't even sell. Great LBS.

    The individual from Spot was not very helpful. All conversations were over email, and while I don't want to throw them under the bus (we really do love the bikes themselves and the service we got months ago when we first purchased the bikes and had questions was good), the way they handled this issue will make me think twice about buying another one of their products. I believe the person I dealt with is new (it was a tiny company when we visited them in Summer of 2018 and we met most of the crew there), but still, I think I should of been treated a bit better after giving them $10,000 in business just last August. We're talking 1.4% of that price when it comes to $140 in labor on $10k bikes. My last bike was an Ibis and that company's customer service was excellent compared to this... Anyway, read on.


    Hey everyone,

    I realize I'm putting myself at risk here of being torn apart by the forum community here, but I'm just looking for some advice (which I guess would be "just shut up and pay" or something else...)

    So my wife and I bought $10k of bikes last August from a direct to consumer manufacturer. These bikes have been great, with the exception of the shitty SRAM guide rsc brakes. When we got them and they felt squishy, I was told, "that's just modulation". A few months later I had a friend bleed them, and they were ok for a few weeks, and then got spongy again. Winter came (live in northern midwest) and we didn't pull bikes out again until March. Got another bleed done by a reputable shop, and the brakes were good for about another 3-4 weeks... Went in to the same shop this past week and the mechanic says "that's not right, let's try and warranty these for you"... and they did! However now we have to pay another $140 to install them.

    (by squishy/spongy I mean the levers were being pulled to the bars and still was not having the braking force I expected after riding shimanos my entire life)

    So basically I'm out $240 on SRAM brakes... yes, we are getting new brakes (that hopefully won't have issues) but I'm still a bit annoyed. The bike shop said SRAM wouldn't cover labor. I contacted the company we bought the bikes from and they said, "unfortunately there is nothing we can do. "

    Yes, I get it, if I could spend $10k on bikes I can spend $240 on labor... but to me this isn't right? Or is it? Should I try to contact SRAM directly? Argue more with the bike company? Or the shop? (probably not the shop). Or just shut up and pay?

    Thanks for reading guys... and don't beat me up too bad if I'm in the wrong (I'll just support my local shop).

    Edit: yes I realize this is a risk you take when buying a direct to consumer bike vs a bike from a local shop. In our case most shops around only sell specialized/trek/cannondale which we were not interested in.
    Last edited by zeppman; 1 Week Ago at 09:11 AM.

  2. #2
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    Doesn't hurt to ask, seems like you're going to have to bite the bullet on this one. No one works for free.

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    I gave up on Sram brakes ,replace with Shimano's. If I could I'd get the warranty replacements and sell them. Brakes aren't that hard to replace ,do it yourself.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Train Wreck View Post
    Doesn't hurt to ask, seems like you're going to have to bite the bullet on this one. No one works for free.
    Trainwreck, totally agree, and I want the shop to get paid (they deserve it and in my opinion went above and beyond to help us out)... I guess I'm more annoyed with SRAM and the bike mfg.

  5. #5
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    Nothing wrong with being upset about a bill for components that should have worked right from the beginning.

    I cut hose and bleed brakes myself, have no idea what it costs these days. If it is both front and rear for bikes, it is $35 pet brake? Sounds okay to me.

    You can watch DIY videos on YouTube and save some money. By the 4th brake you'll have it down.

    On the warranty issue, it depends on the agreement s with shops. If SRAM doesn't pay the shop it would be unreasonable for you to ask shop to do it for nothing, don't you think?

    Your issue us with SRAM and the buy-direct company that sold you the bikes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rangeriderdave View Post
    I gave up on Sram brakes ,replace with Shimano's. If I could I'd get the warranty replacements and sell them. Brakes aren't that hard to replace ,do it yourself.
    I feel like I'd be screwing the bike shop a bit though by just picking up the brakes. I guess that is an option though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cjsb View Post
    Nothing wrong with being upset about a bill for components that should have worked right from the beginning.

    I cut hose and bleed brakes myself, have no idea what it costs these days. If it is both front and rear for bikes, it is $35 pet brake? Sounds okay to me.

    You can watch DIY videos on YouTube and save some money. By the 4th brake you'll have it down.

    On the warranty issue, it depends on the agreement s with shops. If SRAM doesn't pay the shop it would be unreasonable for you to ask shop to do it for nothing, don't you think?

    Your issue us with SRAM and the buy-direct company that sold you the bikes.

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    Yes, $35 per brake. I do all my own wrenching on everything except brakes... just never invested in the tools or wanted to deal with oil. I agree, the shop deserves the money. Just not sure how to go about it now with SRAM/bike mfg.

  8. #8
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    Manufacturers typically don't cover labor. My LBS covers all the labor for defective parts on the bikes I bought there. They've replaced fork dampers (even on a bike I didn't buy there), hubs, fixed multiple creaks, and even trued wheels for me multiple times at no charge.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by zeppman View Post
    Yes, $35 per brake. I do all my own wrenching on everything except brakes... just never invested in the tools or wanted to deal with oil. I agree, the shop deserves the money. Just not sure how to go about it now with SRAM/bike mfg.
    If you haven’t talked with SRAM directly, then I’d try that. If you can go up the chain at the bike company then I’d try that, too. You may get some response from the Bike MFG if you made it a public post in their forum on MTBR?

    The main reason I am suggesting this is that this type of issue is negotiable. It is up to them if they want to negotiate a resolution, and obviously you do. There are bike shops with either practices or agreements where the labor gets covered by the company who made the defect, or they have some other arrangements based on ongoing work they do.

    But if this company and SRAM are not going to budge at all then you may at least want to reveal the bike brand so others know what to expect when they buy from them. There are no shortage of companies who will tell you that you were compensated through the much lower price of the bike—and that’s okay, too.


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  10. #10
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    You've got a few things going on, but I don't think the direct-to-consumer issue is the biggest one.

    The biggest one is that SRAM still sells POS brakes and manufacturers still put them on bikes.

    My wife's bike has Guide RS brakes on it (and a huge pile of other SRAM products) and they're teetering towards getting replaced. IMO, they're not really even worth warrantying. I've encountered more than one person who has had to go through that process more than once.

    It's part of the reason why my last 3 bikes have been built from the frame up. I gave that option to my wife for her last bike purchase and she didn't want it because it would have meant she'd be waiting longer for the bike.

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    @cjsb, I didn't want to reveal the bike company as I wanted to give them a chance to help out, but it doesn't seem like they are going to budge. They said that the warranty issue is between me and the bike shop and SRAM....

    @Harold, I hear you... I'm thinking more towards just switching over to Shimano.

    I'll try giving SRAM a call tomorrow.

  12. #12
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    No you are not being unreasonable, but Sram brakes are disposable. Shimano and move on.
    How can anyone who's been riding as long as I have, be so slow???

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    I've been 'direct' type consumer for years but I do all my own mntc. I can see how this could be an issue if you need to have a shop fix or tweak anything that needs attention.
    I'm the same with my cars, motorcycles, etc. Dealers and shops have let me down too many times so I take the time to figure it out and do it myself. I enjoy the challenge of solving problems...it's sorta like therapy for me.

    Regarding SRAM brakes...my current bike (see sig) came with SRAM Guide R's and they have been fine. I've heard/read all the horror stories and I was always a Shimano guy but I have no complaints. After 1.5 years and over 2,000 miles of use I have replaced pads a couple of times but had no issues beyond regular mntc.

    I can say the same with my dropper (Reverb Steath 170mm) which also has endless threads where people have had problems. Mine had issues out of the box riding in the cold (REAL cold...below 20 degF). After researching I bought a bleed kit and did a proper bleed of dropper and plunger. NEVER a problem since.

    It's easy to say 'do it yourself' but the reality is many folks don't have the tools, the place to work on the bike, and the patience/background/ability to do it. That's why shops are there and that is their living so they need to get paid obviously.

    Bottom line...if you buy a bike on-line and don't plan on learning how to maintain it then you should be prepared to pay the man when problems come up.
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    It is just the nature of warranty however, and perhaps is something that should change.

    I do heating and air conditioning work. Let's say I have a customer that had XYZ A/C install their system for them 3 years ago, and since then the owner has retired and they closed.

    The system has a compressor failure, which I go out and diagnose. The compressor is under manufacturer's warranty. I tell a customer he is going to owe about $500 for refrigerant recovery, system flush, and labor to install the compressor.
    I definitely would not do the work for free. First off, I did not even sell the equipment and made any profit on that equipment. so this situation that you are having translated into my stereo would mean that I as the company that made no money on the sale of the equipment, should not get paid anything, but fix it.
    Obviously that is not right.

    Should the manufacturer of the equipment or the compressor manufacturer pay for my labor and all of the incidental charges? I don't know. All that is truly going to do is raise prices on everything because now the manufacturer is accepting more liability.

    Shop should get paid, you should not have to pay for new brakes. So how does all that happen? I don't know honestly.

  15. #15
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    You can get a couple sets of Shimano brakes for less than $250. Much more reliable, in my experience.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mountainbiker24 View Post
    You can get a couple sets of Shimano brakes for less than $250. Much more reliable, in my experience.
    yup, before shimano stopped the sale from EU dealers to the US you could get a set of XT brakes (4 pot front/2 rear) for under $200. They sure blow any SRAM brake out of the water and just work.
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    Sounds on par -warranty parts, shop charges labor costs for installation. Nut sure the $140 per bike cost though. Maybe they need to separate the brake from caliper for internal routing, then full bleed?

    I'd actually suggest you forfeit the warranty and purchasing new brakes for the same cost that are more reliable -unless you otherwise enjoy SRAM brakes aside from this situation. You can purchase brakes for about this cost then pay your shop to install. Maybe slight upgrade too, larger rotors and better pads.

  18. #18
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    Hi zeppman,

    It's a sad fact that one can't rely on SRAM for brakes. There are multiple threads on multiple sub-forums here on MTBR that document the issues. Many people don't have issues...but why should the consumer pay to play Russian Roulette?

    I'd cut my losses and move onto another brand of brakes.

    It's very, very poor that the company that you bought the bikes from hasn't sorted this out for you. Please name them. Over time it may be shamed into improving it's behaviour

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rock View Post
    No you are not being unreasonable, but Sram brakes are disposable. Shimano and move on.
    Well, Shimano brakes are the definition of disposable, since they don't make any seal kits. If a part fails, you have to throw them away. I've had it happen a few times. One was warrantied thankfully, but one was on vacation and totally screwed me. The real crappy part is you can't set them up at the beginning of the season with fresh seals, to prevent any mid-season failure that could happen while you are screaming down a mountain. Nope, you just get to wait till they fail at some inopportune time. There are some other issues, like wandering bite-point and weeping fluid when you leave them sitting for a few weeks, but not offering replacement pistons, cylinders, seals, etc., is just BS. That and now Shimano is into 4 different mounting standards.

    Sorry, I just don't see the big "S" as the brake-king they were a few years back. I'm not going to be buying any more of their brakes due to these issues.
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  20. #20
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    This is the issue I have with all of these "direct to consumer" ....if a component has an issue, you should be able to contact the "direct to consumer" seller and deal with the warranty through them. You shouldn't have to go to some other shop to handle it.
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    seems like the shop wants to charge you for doing the warranty work, $140 for a brakeser install is too much money. tell them tou want the breaks and will do the work and install.

    I’d pay something like $40 at most per bike, it’s a 30m work at most!

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by mfa81 View Post
    seems like the shop wants to charge you for doing the warranty work, $140 for a brakeser install is too much money. tell them tou want the breaks and will do the work and install.

    I’d pay something like $40 at most per bike, it’s a 30m work at most!
    He's got two bikes, so 4 brakes, it sounds like.

    It's a bitch to run internal brakes. If the shop did 4 brakes on internal frames, that actually seems fair.

    I work on cars, and doing 4 brakes, I charge $945 labor. I think it's honestly less work than running damned internal bike brakes!

    I think sram should pay labor, but bike companies don't pay labor. That's a fight you won't win. The shop had nothing to do with sram or the bike company, so they're owed labor by someone. The bike company spec's the dumb things so they do seem kinda liable, but bike companies also tend to not pay labor.

    I think it's not quite fair, but its how it is either way.

  23. #23
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    First - lots of tests from various places indicate that SRAM Guides don’t have as much stopping power as Shimano brakes. So, your “still not as much power as I expect having ridden shimano all my life” comment makes me think there probably wasn’t anything wrong with your guides to start with. I’ve discovered a LOT of people mistake the lever free throw and initial contact of Guides for “squishiness” after being accustomed to shimano brakes. The better feeling after each bleed was probably what I refer to as the “overfill” effect from pressurizing the system during the bleed. It will temporarily shorten the lever throw until the pads wear a little.

    All this said, before you spend money, maybe you just need to get some more Shimano brakes. Have the shop order the new brakes and install them, you take the new never installed Guides that are being warrantied and sell them to offset some of the cost, and move on.

    As for the shop charging for the install/SRAM not paying for labor - that’s pretty normal unless you buy the bike there. Even then, I’ve taken bikes to the shop I bought them and had to pay for labor on warranty service if it’s beyond a year from the purchase even for having parts swapped for a frame warranty. My LBS tries to hook me up every time they can, but even bike mechanics have to eat.

  24. #24
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    In my earlier post I avoided the Shimano v. SRAM because it is a more long-term resolution, but it’s an option. Still, there are plenty of riders who don’t like Shimano, so don’t look at it as a cure all.

    If I spent $10k on bikes and the bike company said “go **** yourself,” I’d be upset. They don’t deserve any protection from internet exposure.

    A company like that, which can do absolutely nothing for you, should not be afraid to say it up front, loud and clear: “when you buy something from us, no matter what shit components we spec on your bike , component issues are between you and Company X, so that we can make more money on a sale.”

    They spec the bike don’t they? But they have no responsibility for the quality of the parts they select? Okay, fine. I would at east et on the phone with the bike company owner and tell him”****YOU! That was $10k worth!”

    If you refer a more diplomatic approach you may ask them if they can give you a $150 JensonUSA, CC, or Amazon gift card, so you can buy the bleed kit and brake fluid to do the work yourself.

    If you don’t want to DIY, then the shop that got the SRAM warranty for you and will do it for $35 per brake, sounds solid, give them the business and use your gift card on something else.

    I bought a heckler from CC a few years ago and there was an issue with headset loosening. Turned out that whoever installed the fork, whether it was CC or SantaCruz, they put the crown race on upside down, among other things, this prevented the headset from staying tight. CC let me choose any headset they sold, even a 110 as compensation for this relatively modest issue. Maybe Santa Cruz funded it, I don’t know? But I didn’t have to ask at all and was floored by their willingness to resolve it so quickly.

    The Company you bought the bike from, it sounds like they have no resources or no willingness, or both, to provide the fine nuances of customer service. I would ask them if they bought a bunch of SRAM return items to spec the bike, do they care at all about the quality of their brand, which is more than the frame because they decide what gets specd on the bike? When you spend the kind of money you did-=the expectations get ramped up—if the bike company doesn’t understand that, then fine—let the buying public explain it to them.


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    OK guys, I'll try to clear some stuff up, answer questions.

    The bike company is Spot. The guide RSC brakes are spec'd on their "5 star" build at the time. The brakes are under 1 year old (probably have around 750 miles on them). Right now our conversations have been only email.

    The bike shop is charging $35 per brake, so $140 total for both bikes. They originally said Sram typically pays for all warranty work, but when the new brakes came in they said they got us an "upgrade" to guide Ultimates, but Sram wouldn't pay for labor.

    It seems buying shimano will cost us more (but possibly save us in the long run if these ultimates go to shit?)

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by zeppman View Post
    OK guys, I'll try to clear some stuff up, answer questions.

    The bike company is Spot. The guide RSC brakes are spec'd on their "5 star" build at the time. The brakes are under 1 year old (probably have around 750 miles on them). Right now our conversations have been only email.

    The bike shop is charging $35 per brake, so $140 total for both bikes. They originally said Sram typically pays for all warranty work, but when the new brakes came in they said they got us an "upgrade" to guide Ultimates, but Sram wouldn't pay for labor.

    It seems buying shimano will cost us more (but possibly save us in the long run if these ultimates go to shit?)
    When, not if imho.
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    Quote Originally Posted by upstateSC-rider View Post
    When, not if imho.
    So are SRAM brakes really that bad??? I'll be honest, I didn't do much research on them, but I have heard of issues with them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zeppman View Post
    So are SRAM brakes really that bad??? I'll be honest, I didn't do much research on them, but I have heard of issues with them.
    Obviously not everyone has had issues with them but I had problems with the only pair I've had, and many others too.

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    Dumb question, when bleeding them, are they following the directions with contact point adjustment, etc?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Supah Dave View Post
    Dumb question, when bleeding them, are they following the directions with contact point adjustment, etc?
    I assume so because the brakes felt good for a couple weeks after both my friend and the shop bled them.

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    So SRAM admitted that the brakes on your bikes are bad, but you still have to pay over $200? I would go Shimano for that reason alone and never look back. Gave up on SRAM after trying their awful Avid line.

    Edit: Would an average LBS do the wok for free if you bought the bike there?

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by zeppman View Post
    OK guys, I'll try to clear some stuff up, answer questions.

    The bike company is Spot. The guide RSC brakes are spec'd on their "5 star" build at the time. The brakes are under 1 year old (probably have around 750 miles on them). Right now our conversations have been only email.

    The bike shop is charging $35 per brake, so $140 total for both bikes. They originally said Sram typically pays for all warranty work, but when the new brakes came in they said they got us an "upgrade" to guide Ultimates, but Sram wouldn't pay for labor.

    It seems buying shimano will cost us more (but possibly save us in the long run if these ultimates go to shit?)
    okay, that adds some clarification. I think that's a reasonable price. that's the kinda cost you need to be willing to deal with when buying direct to customer. I don't think the shop is being unreasonable charging what they are, maybe a little too much but I honestly don't think it's unreasonable.

    on the other hand, spot should have been able to handle the warranty for you and get new brakes sent to you! sram is replacing brakes no question asked from what I can see on the web, so they wouldn't have any problem getting you new brakesets and let you choose what/how to do with it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pisgah View Post
    So SRAM admitted that the brakes on your bikes are bad, but you still have to pay over $200? I would go Shimano for that reason alone and never look back. Gave up on SRAM after trying their awful Avid line.

    Edit: Would an average LBS do the wok for free if you bought the bike there?
    Well I actually just got off the phone with SRAM. I spoke to someone who stated they always offer to pay labor "especially for brakes" and it's up to bike shop if they want to accept.

    So... I'm torn. Not sure if I should spend another $140 (in addition to the $100 to have the shop bleed the brakes a month ago), or call the shop and say no thanks.

    To me it's BS that I spent $5k per bike that has brakes that really don't work all that well. However, I don't know where to point the finger on who should pay. The bike shop is helping us out, and did work the warranty for us, and I understand they need to cover their labor. SRAM is giving us new brakes (an "upgrade" too, and claim they offered to pay for labor). Spot (or at least the one individual I emailed with) just wants to wash their hands of the situation.

    I get it, things happen, mountain bikes are expensive toys that cost money to upkeep. But in this case my wife and I did nothing wrong, and the brakes (which came on a $5k) bike, failed within 10 months, several of which were spent sitting in a basement
    during the winter.

  34. #34
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    can't say I'm terribly surprised that spot is trying to wash their hands of the issue. I haven't heard good things about their warranty dept.

    I also wouldn't be surprised if the shop is taking the "penalize the customer for bringing in an internet-purchased product" tact. Some shops can be rather nasty about that, and it seems like the ones that are tend to be in areas that have less robust bike sales/ridership. I worked at one in Michigan for awhile that kept a list in the service dept of brands they wouldn't touch. Mostly dept store brands, but also some internet brands, and this was before direct-to-consumer sales of bikes really took off.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    ...I also wouldn't be surprised if the shop is taking the "penalize the customer for bringing in an internet-purchased product" tact. Some shops can be rather nasty about that...
    Not any rational ones and few successful ones. The LBS I frequent is entirely friendly and welcoming to customers who bring in direct to consumer bikes. It's business, and by being nice to the customer they'll get more. Treat them poorly and they'll get less. Duh.
    Do the math.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    Not any rational ones and few successful ones. The LBS I frequent is entirely friendly and welcoming to customers who bring in direct to consumer bikes. It's business, and by being nice to the customer they'll get more. Treat them poorly and they'll get less. Duh.
    Yes, this bike shop has been very nice to us, and actually just called me back and said "they spoke to sram and the labor will be covered"

    So shout out to Zion Cyclery in Zion, IL. In my opinion they have gone above and beyond for us and I will give them more business in the future. I guess SRAM has come through for us too.

    Spot on the other hand....

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    Not any rational ones and few successful ones.
    I'd agree with this. But that doesn't mean it doesn't happen. I've spent quite a few years living in areas with less robust cycling communities and some shops in those areas DO take those steps. With less (or no) competition, there's often not really anybody challenging them by taking a more open and accommodating path on that.

    I lived in one area for over 4yrs with one shop within a 100mi radius. I'm not sure if they had a policy on internet purchases, but they were the only game in town so to speak, and could do almost whatever they wanted.

    I'm not sure if the shop where I worked in MI has changed their policy or not. I worked there about 15yrs ago now, and direct-to-consumer bike sales were still early and there wasn't really much high end stuff available yet, unlike now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zeppman View Post
    Well I actually just got off the phone with SRAM. I spoke to someone who stated they always offer to pay labor "especially for brakes" and it's up to bike shop if they want to accept..
    When SRAM offers to "pay" for warranty labor it's generally to send the shop product (usually chains) that in theory the shop will then sell to cover the labor. Not all shops want products they may not sell anytime soon as reimbursement for taking an employee away from actual paying customers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rider95124 View Post
    When SRAM offers to "pay" for warranty labor it's generally to send the shop product (usually chains) that in theory the shop will then sell to cover the labor. Not all shops want products they may not sell anytime soon as reimbursement for taking an employee away from actual paying customers.
    That's good to know rider95124. We do intend to buy some stuff from the shop (we need tires and a few other items)... although I know that may not come out to the same amount of profit for the shop.

    Is it stupid to offer some money towards the install? I don't want things to get weird, but I don't want the shop to get ripped off.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by zeppman View Post
    Yes, this bike shop has been very nice to us, and actually just called me back and said "they spoke to sram and the labor will be covered"

    So shout out to Zion Cyclery in Zion, IL. In my opinion they have gone above and beyond for us and I will give them more business in the future. I guess SRAM has come through for us too.

    Spot on the other hand....
    Alright and congrats. If it were me and I was faced with a 250 bill for new brakes, I would have washed my hands with the brand. So good for SRAM.

    Coincidently, SRAM replaced my lower line Avids with XOs. However, they still had the same problem and I ditched all together. Hopefully yours is a one-off.

  41. #41
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    Im a huge proponent of direct-to-consumer and its the only way I go now... but along with that, you sort of have to commit to taking care of things yourself. IMO, its not a downside, its another benefit of direct sales and something I very much appreciate.

    Id take this opportunity to begin doing your own work. Get the warranty brakes and toss them on ebay. Youtube some park videos on brake installation, and throw on nice, reliable shimanos. You'll actually come out ahead, with better brakes. You can skip this LBS runaround for the rest of your entire life with about an hour of instructional videos and an hour of work.

    Its a little bit like buying food at the grocery store, then not being happy about having to pay someone to cook it for you at home. You went that route, you're sort of expected to do it yourself.

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    Great resolution—congrats! You’re close enough to Wisconsin—free cheese curds and New Glarus for everyone!!!


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by zeppman View Post
    I guess SRAM has come through for us too.
    And here's the dirty little secret. My last response may have sounded like I was a SRAM hater and ran shimano brakes. The truth is, I grew up riding rim brakes MTB's on rooty off camber humidity-slick east coast trails. Shimano brakes have way too much initial bite for me. I like SRAMs feel on the other hand. So, while I've had to warranty EVERY set of SRAM brakes I've ever had....the warranty process was always painless, and SRAM always took care of the problem. Yeah, I paid my LBS for some brake installs, but what the heck, I like all those guys, and try to support them every chance I get anyhow. And that's why I haven't gone looking for "something better" than SRAM brakes...

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    From what I've gathered over the years, but could be wrong:

    Most bike companies also don't deal with parts warranties, unless it's a frame warranty. They send you, or the LBS, to the part maker for warranty.

    Most warranties have a disclaimer - "not responsible for included labor or return shipping". It's at the part maker's discretion on a case by case. They are not always eager to offer up labor/shipping costs, without some pushback, if at all.

    Most LBS will deal with the included labor costs of a warranty, if you bought the complete bike from them, or if you ordered the part with install fee from them.

    Direct to consumer requires you handle these things yourself. That's the deal you signed up for.

    I like Shimano brakes, especially my new 4pot XT brakes.

  45. #45
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    Ok, Here's my play on this.

    When you buy online you have to expect that warranty claims will be difficult compared to buying local. You may need to pay for freight, fix your own stuff, experience delays shipping stuff away and simply not be supported as well as local.

    After all you would have received a hefty discount rather than buying local. How much did you save compared to buying the same bike local?

    When buying online you need to weigh up the discount you receive V the inconvenience and cost of potential warrantee claims. If that discount isnt enough to cover the cost or inconvienince of some minor repairs then don't buy online. Buy local. It is far easier to address warrantee claims with local vendors.


    Secondly. I would expect that if you buy a whole bike online you should have the skills to wrench on it yourself for the majority of stuff. Afterall you are not recieving any local back up support. Brake bleeding and brake changing is a skill you should have if you intend to buy complete bikes online.


    So..... I believe you have learnt a lesson here. Weigh up the pros and cons of buying online before doing so. Expect to incur additional costs if any warrantee claims are needed.
    Don't buy online if the savings isnt significant. Don't be annoyed if there is inconvenience/cost with warrantee claims from online vendores. Its part of the risk you taking when buying online.

  46. #46
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    A good video, how the Syndicate bleeds brakes:

    https://youtu.be/piWBVDh1pTE

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    What bikes did you buy........
    I Pity The Fool That Can't Ride A Bike Without A Dropper!!

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