advice on clipless pedals- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1

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    advice on clipless pedals

    i am a fairly new rider and i have bean thinking about upgrading to clipless pedals
    they seam to have many advantages but also some disadvantages for a new rider
    i have encountered many situations where i wish i had bean cliped in but i have also encountered time when i was very glad that i was not
    i have bean looking around online and have discovered crank brothers mallet C's
    they seam to be the perfect solution to my problem because they alow you to ride clipped in or not depending on your mood at the time, but i have often found that the perfect solution is often not what it seams

    any advice on this topic will be greatly apriciated, thanks in advance

  2. #2
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    Go entirely clipless. sure, there's a learning curve, but as you find yourself getting more and more comfortable with the clips, you'll just want to stay in them. and the platform side will be dead weight, and also it'll force you to find the right side of the pedal with the clip on it, which is hella annoying on the mountain. my 2 cents

    GL,
    -don

  3. #3

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    I just bought...

    the new 2004 Time ATAC XS and they work great. I was using Shimano's pedal that clips on one side and has a platform on the other, but always found myself looking down to see if the clip in side was up.

  4. #4

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    good choice

    I bought a pair of crank bros mallet C's last week. They look and feel rock solid and they are my first pair of clipless pedals. Have been going serious into trail riding for one year and also thought it was time to change over for many reasons you will find stated on this board and what others have said. My first real upgrade anyhow and I am sure I will not be unhappy with those pedals. TWO yr warentee on them also. Not to shabby.

  5. #5
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    clipless

    if i was forced to downgrade components -- the pedals would be the last thing to go! Once you get comfortable in them, they are worth their weight in gold! i tried the shimano 545 before, (they are the double sided with a platform) and i hated them. time's work great, but for me Crank Bros Eggbeaters were the best! I have been riding them for three years now with no problems, and if they ever die i will buy another pair that day. they are easy to get into ( 4 sided) no matter what the conditions -- and easy to como out of. ( i don't even think about it -- even when i am going down i am out no problem)


    Pedals are the one upgrade worth every penny! Get Em and you'll be happy
    The nine most terrifying words in the English language are, 'I'm from the government and I'm here to help.' --Ronald Reagan

  6. #6
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    Time ATAC's are good learning pedals. They have a solid click sound and feel when you snap in and they are pretty easy to get out of. Plus they have enough of a platform to keep you on your pedals when you miss.They are great in the snow and mud and the lack of adjustment keeps a newbie from messing around with it too much. The eggbeaters are another solid pedal but they could be a bit tricky for newbies. The 4 sided clip in thing can make it a guessing game sometimes

  7. #7
    Jm.
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    The hardest thing to overcome with clipless pedals is how to effectively and reliabily clip INTO them when you are in rough terrain or on a serious upslope.

    Unclipping becomes natural rather fast and you do have to set the springs correctly(set loose first and tighten if you accidentally come out), but it is something that you learn and it just becomes second nature.

    There is a big psychological hurdle to overcome obviously with them, but most experienced users know that getting clipped back in is usually the hardest thing, not unclipping for a crash or to dab, that happens naturally.

  8. #8
    Wizard of the Trail
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    We the people ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Jm.
    The hardest thing to overcome with clipless pedals is how to effectively and reliabily clip INTO them when you are in rough terrain or on a serious upslope.

    Unclipping becomes natural rather fast and you do have to set the springs correctly(set loose first and tighten if you accidentally come out), but it is something that you learn and it just becomes second nature.

    There is a big psychological hurdle to overcome obviously with them, but most experienced users know that getting clipped back in is usually the hardest thing, not unclipping for a crash or to dab, that happens naturally.

    I had the time atacs and crank bros mallet c and I hated the times. The mallet c is not as hard to get out of compared to the time pedals, but you have to turn your anke 15 degrees at the least to unclip. What I am doing and seem to be having success is this. I bought a cheap pair of nashbar pedals with 4 degree release angle and tension spring adjustment, I figure when I get used to clipping out of these, I will graduate into the mallets. I find the mallets aren't the greatest for being clipped out for two reasons. 1. You have the platform, but you tend to slide off the platform when not clipped in. 2. As your feet are sliding, they sometimes clip in when you don't want to be. So, if your worried about being stuck into them, try the cheap pair at of adjustable tension pedals at:
    http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?
    category=108&subcategory=1078&brand=&sku=2428&stor etype=&estoreid=
    That way your won't be out 90 bucks if you don't like them. They aren't the best pedals, but there no too bad either. When you get good at those, then try the time or eggbeater style if you want. They are great because they function well in mud, but not for newbies IMHO. Its your call. Good luck!!

  9. #9
    Ride on
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    platform might not be useful

    I bought some Shimano 545's because I also wanted to be able to use them without clipping in on occasion. However the clip mechanism sticks up in the middle of the pedal, so I don't have very good traction unclipped. The platform does make it easy to crank the pedals until I can get a positive click though.

  10. #10

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    Times

    You cant beat clippless but dont buy cheap ones as you wont be happy with them. Buy time attack carbons or if you plan on getting into racing buy eggbeaters as neither one of these will wear out for a long time and you will love them both

  11. #11

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    thanks

    thanks for all the advice so far

    the issue of acidentaly clipping in dose not concern me because if i am whereing cleats then i would probobly stay clipped in but i would like to be able to ride in flat shoes to

    is there enybody who can say first hand wether the egg beater part of the peddal stays out of the way when riding in normal shoes on the mallets, the company web site claims that that it dose but i would like to know for shure

  12. #12

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    Deore XT's with PowerGrips work for me. For me, they are the ideal solution for a mountain bike. I like to ride in hiking boots, because I walk a lot. Being a 215 lb guy on a singlespeed will do that to you. The ability to grab my bike for a quick trip to the liquor store is a big plus.

    The thing I like about PowerGrips is that, when I need to get going on a hill, or any other place where momentum matters, I can just step on the PowerGrips. Once I'm in a position to strap in, they spring right back up. Retention is just about right, for me at least. Plus, if you hate them, your only out 20 bucks.

    FWIW, I just went back to toe clips and slotted cleats on the road, after 17 years on clipless. I don't feel like I'm giving anything up in the efficiency department, and I get a big payoff in versatility.

    In other words, clipless pedals have their place, but, as with most things in cycling, the advantages are overstated, and the disadvantages are ignored. Recreational, transportation, and racing cyclists have different needs, and their equipment choices should reflect this.

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