First Frame in the books (almost)- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    First Frame in the books (almost)

    Hey all,

    Long time lurker and have been working on getting through my first frame for a very long time. It's been an incredible process. I built my own welding jig, tube bender mitering fixtures as well as a slough of other tools and shop aids along the way and have learned so much. So many thanks to everyone on here for sharing their builds and knowledge as well as many other private convo's I've had with many experienced guys will to share.

    It's a Hard tail 27.5+/29r. Custom Yoke i designed and had machined. 418mm chainstays, and ~1150mm wheelbase, 148 boost rear end. (I don't have the print at the moment to show all the exact geometry, my free bikecad version seems to have gotten corrupted so i need to rebuild it to get a pic of it all). Will be pariing with a DVO Diamond fork. Going for a burly 29r to ride in the NW. Super excited to play more with the forward geometry.

    Just dropped it off at the powder coater last night, so i'll update later with pics painted and when built up. I'll also be posting some more things about what i've learned over the coming weeks, but for now, here's some pics:
    First Frame in the books (almost)-img_4577.jpgFirst Frame in the books (almost)-img_4584.jpgFirst Frame in the books (almost)-img_4593.jpgFirst Frame in the books (almost)-img_4597.jpgFirst Frame in the books (almost)-img_4601.jpgFirst Frame in the books (almost)-img_4608.jpgFirst Frame in the books (almost)-img_4610.jpgFirst Frame in the books (almost)-img_4612.jpgFirst Frame in the books (almost)-img_4614.jpgFirst Frame in the books (almost)-img_4615.jpgFirst Frame in the books (almost)-fullsizerender.jpg
    Last edited by MannaDesigns; 01-09-2017 at 12:06 PM.

  2. #2
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    Wow looks great, nice work! Such an amazing feeling when you make a frame. Just wait till you ride it ;-)
    You said you made a bender, was it for the seat tube?

  3. #3
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    It actually has multiple dies and I used it for the seat tube, the down tube and it does pairs of stays so I can make matching stay bends That's another one of my "future posts" I'll add here when I get some time...

  4. #4
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    Very cool, I'm looking forward to seeing the bender you've made!

  5. #5
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    Nice job man.

  6. #6
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    Nice work!


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  7. #7
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    Sick. It's been a while coming but was worth it! Kudos!

    Agreed, give us bender pics and details! I'd love to be able to put a nice tight radius bend in a DT like that.

    -Walt

  8. #8
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    Very, very cool to be able to build your own frame, looks really nice, should be a ripper. What BB size is it running 73mm or 83mm? Front chainring clearance? Able to run 1x only or 2x?
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  9. #9
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    Please clean your tubes in the future , a polished weld area is a happy weld area.
    Follow me on Instagram for up to date build pics -Brad4130
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  10. #10
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    Nice work man. What is the diameter and wall thicknesses of the seat and chain stays?

  11. #11
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    3/4 x .035 straight gauge 4130 (aircraft spruce)... Might be a bit lighter than i should have gone for my size, but i'm gonna give it a whirl

  12. #12
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    Nice work. And +1 on bender pics. Coupla questions:

    1. Paragon yoke? Not messing around
    2. What are the bridges (seatstay, disc)? Custom?

  13. #13
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    Couple updates!

    Hey all - figured I'd add a few more pics that i dug out of my phone to address a few questions.

    First - good point about cleaning tubes. I got lazy on the last few welds for the bridges, but believe it or not i did do a quick sand and acetone wipe, just not as good as it should have been. We were moving in a few days and i was marathoning in the shop to get this thing done before packing up the entire shop...

    On the bridges - those are custom. i had planned on using some 3/4 tube, but as i looked at it more, I decided i wanted to try something a little different, and figured with the angles of the stays, it'd be more work to miter a tube to fit in there. I wasn't planning on doing the seat stay bridge, but after making the brake bridge, i was happy with how it came out, so i made another You can see in one of the pics below, it's just machined sort of "free hand" out of some steel plate.

    the bender! this was a joint effort by myself and Devin bodony at Lichen bikes. I'd been working on a version of it for a while, then as Devin and I started working more together we went through a few revisions and landed here. It started as a compression bender based on this design (Bender Tech – Engineered to Slide) however, the thin wall tubing didn't lend itself well. So I thought we should convert it to a draw style bender. We came up with the track system, and flipped it all over. The interesting part for me was trying to come up with something that could use multiple dies that we could make and work for all the different types of bends on the frames I wanted. I knew the thin wall would need a super big bend radius for the larger tubing, so we came up with what we called the "strong back" and die design. This way the machined part is a whole lot less expensive. The dies are aluminum, and cut on a CNC, then i had to do a lot of handwork after doing a lot of test bends to get the right fit on the tubes. But after all that, the concept really came out well and now i can do 18" radius bends on seat tubes, and a 9" radius bend on the 1.5" OD down tube. There is a SLIGHT amount of flattening in the outer side of the bend, but it's barely visible. Compared with the effort of the roller bender, I was very happy.

    Another feature i was super proud of is the matching stay bends. I made the die wider so I could bend matching stays. Since getting an EXACT bend angle is a bit tough, its really nice that even if the bend is slightly less/more, they're at least the same. I'm still playing with the spring back calcs to understand getting the bends more accurate.

    Regarding the bender - i have a feeling I'm going to be asked for more info (mainly because for the last year I've been asking people about their benders). I have plans at some point to draw up some prints for the full design and offer them up on my website for cheap similar to what the Eng to slide guy did. Just not sure when that will be... Much of the design of it was "on the fly" so I didn't fully model it up before we built it, it was a lot of quick sketches in 2D...

    the Yoke: similar to the paragon, but it's my own design. Again machined by Devin Bodony (which btw - if anyone needs any custom parts made, check him out. He does great work and really enjoys working bike specific parts). My yoke is similar to the PMW in design, but the stay interface isn't a sleeve. I also tweaked it to allow some shorter stays than I could fit using the PMW yoke. Pretty happy with it, but I have some other ideas going forward. As cool as it is, it's still an expensive part to 'need' on a frame.

    Anyway I think that's about all for now... here's a picture dump, including the powdercoat!

    As i mentioned, we just moved, so my shop is now all boxed up... it'll be a little while before i'm up and running. Soon as we get the house unboxed, I'll be building up the wheels and then the full bike!

    First Frame in the books (almost)-img_3210.jpgFirst Frame in the books (almost)-img_3853.jpgFirst Frame in the books (almost)-img_3884.jpgFirst Frame in the books (almost)-fullsizerender.jpgFirst Frame in the books (almost)-img_3559.jpgFirst Frame in the books (almost)-img_4587.jpgFirst Frame in the books (almost)-img_3245.jpgFirst Frame in the books (almost)-img_3244.jpgFirst Frame in the books (almost)-img_4180.jpgFirst Frame in the books (almost)-img_4643.jpgFirst Frame in the books (almost)-img_4642.jpgFirst Frame in the books (almost)-img_4624.jpg

  14. #14
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    Wow, this is next level DIY.

    FWIW, mitering tube bridges by hand is super easy and goes really quickly, at least if you use a tube slightly smaller for the bridge, since the exact location isn't critical. Particularly in the case of the brake bridge where the location AND angle can be fudge a few mm/degrees and it doesn't really make a difference. That said, I think your bridges look really slick.

  15. #15
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    One other note was on the ISO tab. Using the drops from framebuilding supply out of portland, the standard PMW iso tabs wouldn't fit on the dropouts since the tabs i purchased had the relieved side. So in similar fashion to the bridges, I traced the existing one then just freehanded a new shape and machined it out. Hoping it all works!

  16. #16
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    LOL hate to say it but thats one of the best looking frames I've seen. I really dig the design of it.

    Makes me wonder why manufacturers cant make cool stuff like this without having it cost a ridiculous amount of money.

    Really cool bike man. Look forward to hearing about how it rides.

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