Cross-Threaded Cable guide- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Always in the wrong gear
    Reputation: Impetus's Avatar
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    Cross-Threaded Cable guide

    I wrote a sob-story post about me not being able to ride for the past 6 months, but you don't care, so I'll get to the point:
    I don't know how, or when, but I began to engage in some long overdue TLC for the bike. Part of that was installing a 1x10 drivetrain to the bike because SS'ing after 6 months of literally ZERO exercise is....unwise I think.

    The cable-guide bolt I'm pointing to below is cross-threaded. It's a water-bottle "braze-on", it even takes the same bolts.



    Cross-Threaded Cable guide-img_0428.jpg

    As seen in the photo, it's a tight fit to get a wrench in there. It's hard to turn even with a hex bit. Its like 1-1.5 inches. from the downtube to the bolt head.
    What do I do?

    Leave it? can it even BE fixed?
    Donít modify the trail to match your skills, modify your skills to match the trails.

  2. #2
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: Walt's Avatar
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    If the threads are f-d enough that you can't get the bolt itself to re-find the proper ones, then I'd just ziptie the guide/housing on there and go ride.

    You can also:
    -Make yourself a tiny tap (cut one down and weld on a little handle) and re-tap it. You'll need a tap you're willing to ruin and a TIG welder, though.
    -Heat up the boss and pull it out, then braze in a new one. Will ruin the paint/powdercoat.

    I'd probably just heave a sigh and get a ziptie and some electrical tape and live with it, but that's just me.

    -Walt

  3. #3
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    Reputation: Meriwether's Avatar
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    if you really can't get a small vice-grip wrench in there to unscrew it would be easiest to just zip tie it as Walt says. But i bet you can get it out with vicegrips and some patience.
    A M5x0.8 tap is what you'd need to get in there but that'll be interesting in that tight space. I'd remove the bolt, add loctite to a new bolt with a bigger socket head (not the rounded cap style) and thread it in as best you can all the way. Even if it's crossthreaded the loctite will hold it in there once it dries.
    Every other *good* option would mean taking it to a machine shop or good bike shop where they can retap or rivnut it and then you have to repaint etc.
    If you get it out and don't want to try to thread another in there use a stick-on single guide from Jagwire or the like:
    https://www.amazon.com/Jagwire-Alloy.../dp/B001CK2LFE

  4. #4
    Always in the wrong gear
    Reputation: Impetus's Avatar
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    Thanks for the input, both of you. I appreciate it.
    You each pointed out a piece of info I neglected to mention:

    the bolt DOES TURN. I could, in practicality, remove the torx headed bolt with an L-shaped key (yeah, i dunno why it's a torx either). I'm certain it wasn't always like that, but I don't recall ever actually taking the bolt FULLY out since the frame was new, so installing it wrong is a mystery. The 2-3 times I've messed with it, just loosened it enough to allow a cable to get into the clamshell. I think other than initial build, I've "gone geared" for a weekend twice, and added a dropper once, so not much use of that bolt.
    Maybe a crash bent it? It's water under the bridge now.

    Current status is:
    The bolt can be loosened, but it clearly looks crooked and is difficult to turn,
    I've done enough wrenching to know when a bolt is in bad shape and I'd rather not fiddle with it at all unless it's to repair it.

    My fear is I'll get it out, and will either not get it started again, or strip it and eff it all up.

    Maybe the best thing is to pull it, plug the hole and use cable guides nearby.
    The braze-on in question is so close to the head tube it tends to rub the cables hard into the sides, and puts a weird bend in them. Ive never loved it, but it's how the bike came.

    I have a few of those stick-ons, I bought like 6 and I've used 2 to guide my front brake up the leg of my Whisky 9 fork to avoid the stupid internal routing.
    Donít modify the trail to match your skills, modify your skills to match the trails.

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